Send to Friend  Bookmark  Print

Hollywood Now: Eric Dane on Last Ship and Kunis & Franco Battle Onscreen

June 11, 2014

Eric Dane
Eric Dane. Credit: Maarten De Boer/TNT
McSteamy “Celebrates Everything”

Grey’s Anatomy fans mourned the untimely death of Dr. Mark “McSteamy” Sloan in 2012, but Eric Dane is alive and well and starring in a new series for TNT. In The Last Ship, a global epidemic drama premiering June 22, he plays Tom Chandler, “the commanding officer of a naval destroyer. We go to the arctic on a routine weapons op, and while we were out the world fell apart and it’s my job to put it back together,” Dane sums up. The Jewish actor, who didn’t grow up observant but is a Cohen on his mother’s side and had a bar mitzvah, now “celebrates everything” with his Baptist-raised wife, actress Rebecca Gayheart, and their daughters Billie, 4, and Georgia, 2. “I want them to see both sides,” he says.

Here’s How Your Summer Starts

How to Train Your Dragon 2, the sequel to the animated hit that hits theaters June 13, has a couple of interfaith actors in its voice cast. Jay Baruchel, who plays the young Viking Hiccup, has one Jewish grandparent—his paternal grandfather was Sephardic—but has characterized himself as “probably agnostic.” Christopher Mintz-Plasse, who plays Fishlegs, is Jewish on his mother’s side and Catholic on his father’s. Other recognizable voices belong to Cate Blanchett, Djimon Honsou, Craig Ferguson, America Ferrera, Gerard Bulter, Kristen Wiig, Kit Harrington, and Jonah Hill.

Kunis & Franco
James Franco & Mila Kunis. Credit: Sony Pictures Classics
The cast of the drama Third Person, opening June 20 in New York and L.A., includes several actors with interfaith connections. The multi-story movie, written and directed by Paul Haggis (Crash), stars Adrien Brody (who has a Jewish mother) as a traveler who gets mixed up in an extortion scheme and James Franco (who also has a Jewish mother), as a New York artist who’s in a custody battle with his ex-wife, played by Mila Kunis (Jewish and engaged to Ashton Kutcher, not Jewish). The all-star roster also includes Liam Neeson, Olivia Wilde, Maria Bello, Kim Basinger and Israeli actress Moran Atias, who stars in FX’s Tyrant starting June 24.

Mensch” is Yiddish for person of integrity and honor, an all-around good guy. The new documentary Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon celebrates the unique life of veteran business manager Shep Gordon and shows why A-list celebrities think so highly of him—and by the end of it, you will too. Gordon, who has guided the careers of stars as diverse as Alice Cooper, Anne Murray and Emeril Lagasse, is a “Jew Bu,” born and raised Jewish but now a practicing Buddhist and personal friend of the Dalai Lama. The film, directed by Mike Myers, who appears along with the aforementioned clients, Michael Douglas, Sylvester Stallone and Tom Arnold, among others, depicts Gordon’s incredible career and his journey of spiritual awakening and enlightenment. Playing in New York and Los Angeles now, it opens in other cities throughout the summer.

Torgny Segerstedt was a Christian Swedish newspaper editor who opposed his country’s neutrality during World War II and dared to speak out against the Nazis and their persecution of Jews. His little-known story is the subject of The Last Sentence, which also delves into the married journalist’s complicated private life: He publicly engaged in a long-time affair with Maja Forssman, the Jewish wife of his close friend, the newspaper’s publisher. The film, opening in New York and Los Angeles on June 20, will be released in more cities in July and August.

P.S.!

Mazel Tov to Once Upon a Time stars Ginnifer Goodwin (Jewish) and Josh Dallas (Christian) on the birth of their son Oliver Finlay, born May 29 in Los Angeles.

Hebrew for "son of the commandments." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish boys come of age at 13. When a boy comes of age, he is officially a bar mitzvah and considered an adult. The term is commonly used as a short-hand for the bar mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration. The female equivalent is "bat mitzvah." Hebrew and Yiddish for "good luck," a phrase used to express congratulations for happy and significant occasions. Of the culture of Jews with family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa. A language, literally meaning "Jewish," once widely used by Ashkenazi communities. It is influenced by German, Hebrew and Slavic languages, and is written with the Hebrew alphabet. It is comparable to the language of many Sephardi communities, Ladino. Yiddish term for an honorable, decent person, usually means "a person of integrity and honor," someone of good character and a deep sense of what is right.
Gerri Miller

Gerri Miller writes and reports from Los Angeles about celebrities, entertainment and lifestyle for MNN.com, The Jewish Journal, Brain World, Lupus Now, Scholastic.com and others. A New York native, she spent a summer working at Kibbutz Giv'at Brenner in Israel and attends High Holy Day services at the Laugh Factory in West Hollywood every year.

Send to Friend  Bookmark  Print

Welcome to InterfaithFamily!

We want to know what you think of our resources. Take our User Survey now through November 22, 2013 and enter to win a $500 American Express gift card!