Challah With a Twist: Scallion Pancake Challah

  

By Molly Yeh

Scallion challah bread by Molly Yeh

Reprinted with permission from Molly Yeh, adapted from MyJewishLearning.

I enjoy being a Chinese Jew. I eat plenty of matzah balls and potstickers and I get to celebrate three New Years.

I’ve often had to convince people that I’m Jewish, which is amusing and usually results in a new friend feeling like they can connect with me better due to a shared religion. Other than that, I can’t say I really thought about what it meant to Chinese and Jewish while I was growing up.

I recently moved out to rural North Dakota with my Norwegian husband, population six Jews and about 10,000 Scandinavian descendants. Things are quiet here, people are Midwestern nice, and the small town life is pretty darn wonderful.

For the first time in my life, I feel a bit like an oddball, in a sea of light-haired Lutherans, but people embrace me when I introduce them to challah. North Dakotans love challah! And I love their food too, like Lefse and dessert bars of all sorts.

All of my challah here is homemade. As are my latkes, kugel, matzah balls… you get the picture. There’s not a deli in sight. Not even a bagel. I do miss bopping down to Zabar’s for babka and bagels, but on the other hand, with the necessity to make everything from scratch comes the opportunity to put my own spin on things and mash up my Chinese/Jewish/Midwesternness.

Brisket in my potstickers, ginger sugar beet latkes, egg rolls with home cured pastrami from a cow that I’ll one day raise…

I’m getting carried away.

But this recipe is me in bread form! Chinese, Jewish and pretty doughy, whether I can help it or not. Inspired by the scallion pancake, here is an Asian twist on my all-time favorite challah.

Scallion Pancake Challah

Makes one large loaf

Basic challah dough

Based on Food 52’s Recipe

  • 1 Tbsp. instant yeast
  • 3/4 cups warm water
  • 2 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. sugar
  • 3 cups flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • 1/3 cups vegetable or canola oil
  • 2 eggs

 

Filling and Topping

  • 1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil
  • 2-3 stalks scallions or green onions, minced
  • salt, pepper, and red chili flakes to taste
  • Egg wash: 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water
  • A few pinches of toasted sesame seeds and black sesame seeds

 

Directions

1.  In a small bowl, proof yeast in 1/2 cup warm water mixed with 1 tsp. of sugar.

2. While yeast is proofing, mix flour, salt, and remaining 2 Tbsp. of sugar in a large bowl.

3. In a medium bowl, mix remaining 1/4 cup of water, honey, oil and eggs.

4. Once yeast has finished proofing, add it to the flour, followed by the wet ingredients. Mix with a large wooden spoon until dough becomes too thick to stir. Empty dough onto well-floured surface and knead by hand. Knead dough until smooth and no longer sticky, adding flour as needed.

5. Transfer to an oiled bowl and cover with a damp towel. Let rise for about two hours, or until doubled in size.

6. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

7. Divide dough into three equal parts and then roll each part into a 1-foot log. Gently flatten each log so that it is about 3 inches wide.

8. Brush each with toasted sesame oil and then sprinkle with salt, pepper, chili flakes, and scallions. Roll them up lengthwise like a jellyroll, and then braid.

9. Place the loaf on a parchment-lined baking sheet and then brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds and black pepper.

10. Bake for 20-25 minutes until the top is golden brown and the challah is cooked through.

Sweet Wine Slushies

  

sweet wine slushie

This recipe contains alcohol and is for those of legal drinking age only.

Introduce your loved ones to good ol’ fashioned Manischewitz, and reinvent the Jewish holiday staple into the dessert it was always meant to be. This way, you can avoid getting any looks that say “You drink this stuff?” or, “Is this what all Jewish wine is like?” Your loved ones will instead wonder why you’ve been hiding this Manischewitz stuff from them all this time. L’chaim! Cheers!

Ingredients:

1 cup sweet kosher wine

1 1/2 cups pear nectar

2-inch piece of ginger

1 lime, zested

1 Tbsp. sugar

Directions:

1. Slice ginger, add to pot with pear nectar and heat on stove, reducing to 1 cup (25 minutes)

2. Strain out the ginger pieces and add the wine to the juice. Pour mixture into a glass baking dish and freeze for one hour.

3. Remove from freezer and using a fork, scrape the slush off the bottom of the dish. Repeat one to two times, freezing for 30 minute increments.

4. Once it’s frozen to desired slushiness, zest your lime and mix it with the sugar. Scoop out your slushie and top with lime sugar.

Black + White Creamsicles

  

Aside from the smell of tuna fish, nothing can really transport me to a New York Jewish deli like a black and white cookie. Just the mere sight of of the cookie transports me to a Shabbat luncheon in which I’m elbow-ing the person to the left and right of me (and sometimes behind me) in an attempt to get my hands on the last black and white cookie.

If you’ve ever been to a Yom Kippur break-the-fast or a Shabbat kiddush lunch, you KNOW what I’m talking about. The dessert table is the first table everyone goes for and most certainly, if there is a black and white cookie to be had, it’s the first cookie taken. (Fun fact: Did you know that the black and white cookie isn’t actually a cookie? It’s considered a drop cake. Whatever it is, it’s delicious.) Though folklore tells us that it was quite possibly not invented in NYC, but actually upstate in Ithaca, it’s still been wholly embraced by deli culture.

For me, the black and white cookie represents one of the greatest parts about being Jewish—that Jewish food can be loved and accepted by all, regardless of Jewish affiliation and/or observance level. And while there’s nothing especially “Jewish” about the black and white cookie, one can’t help but think of Jewish culture when eating it (just like brisket or kugel, in my opinion). And so, in this age of increased aggression and polarization toward the other, shouldn’t we all take Jerry Seinfeld’s lead and “look to the cook” … or in this case, the popsicle?! This recipe takes inspiration from a black and white cookie and transforms it with a fun summery twist to create a delicious creamsicle.

Black + White Creamsicle
makes roughly 12 popsicles

Ingredients for the chocolate layer:

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened natural or Dutch process cocoa powder
  • 1/2 shot of espresso
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract (optional)

 

Directions for chocolate layer:

1. Combine the sugar, espresso, cocoa, cornstarch and salt in a heavy medium saucepan. Whisk in just enough of the milk to make a smooth paste. Whisk in the remaining whipping cream.

2. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat, stirring with the whisk—constantly scraping the bottom, sides and corners of the pot—until the mixture begins to bubble a little at the edges. Continue whisking and cooking for two more minutes.

3. Off heat, whisk in the vanilla and scrape the mixture into a glass or silicone pitcher (for immediate filling) or into the bowl to cool. Next, fill your popsicle molds halfway with your chocolate mixture and freeze for at least six hours.

Next, make your vanilla side.

Ingredients for vanilla layer:

  • 1/4 cup superfine sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

 

Directions for vanilla layer:

1. In a bowl, stir together the sugar and water until the sugar dissolves. Whisk in the sour cream, milk, cream and vanilla.

2. Take your chocolate popsicles out of the freezer and fill the remaining half with your vanilla side. If your mold has a cover with openings for sticks, cover and insert sticks. Otherwise, freeze until the mixture is thick enough to hold a stick upright and then insert sticks. Freeze until hard, about 4 hours if the mixture was cool, 6 or more hours if hot.

3. Line a tray with wax paper. Fill a container with warm water deep enough to dip the full height of your molds. Dip the mold long enough to release the popsicles when you pull on the stick. Remove and set popsicles on wax paper. Wrap each in a piece of wax paper and/or put them in a resealable plastic freezer bag and return them to the freezer until serving.

Click here for a fun non-dairy popsicle recipe from Whitney!

Easy Cherry Curry Chicken Salad

  

Summers are hot, days are long and you want your time in the kitchen to be short. Whether you have a roasted chicken left over from Friday night Shabbat dinner or you pop into the grocery store after an afternoon at the pool and pick up a rotisserie chicken, this recipe will have you craving more. It’s also a nice way to combine the leftovers from a classic Shabbat chicken dinner with some Indian flavor. I find on hot summer days we eat less meat so making something with the leftovers is key. You can set aside some of the mixture before adding the curry powder if anyone likes a milder flavor. Enjoy on a weekend picnic or at the beach!

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 roasted chicken, about two cups chopped
  • 1 cup sweet cherries, pitted
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1/4 – 1/2 cup sliced green garlic or scallions
  • 1 Tbsp. curry powder
  • salt and pepper

 

Directions:

1. You can use whatever chicken is leftover and then adjust how much of each additional ingredient you have. You will want about two cups of chicken. I remove the skin and chop the chicken breast into cubes. I will then do the same with the wing and thigh meat.

2. If you have a cherry pitter, pit the cherries and then slice them in quarters. If not, you can just slice the cherries around the pit into quarters. I cut just to one side of the pit then pop the pit out and slice the cherry.

3. For green garlic, trim the end by the bulb and then slice the garlic thinly up to the green grassy part. For scallions, you can cut all the way up through the greens. I tend to use a little less if I am doing the green garlic as it is more potent than the scallions. Thoroughly wash the cilantro as it can be gritty. Then, chop up the leaves and stems.

4. Toss the mayonnaise with the chicken. I like to use just a thin coating of mayonnaise, but feel free to add more if you like your chicken salad creamy. Then, add in the scallions and chopped cherries. Sprinkle in a generous pinch of salt and several grinds of pepper.

5. For those who don’t like curry, you can take out a portion of the chicken salad now. With the remaining chicken salad, toss in the curry powder (adjust to 1/2 Tbsp. if you took out a lot of the chicken salad to leave plain).

6. Serve on lettuce cups, endive cups or radicchio cups if you want a light, gluten-free lunch or dinner. Serve it with bread for a hearty sandwich.

Key Lime Bars for Shavuot

  

By Mari Levine

I like to call Shavuot the “No meat? No problem!” holiday. When brainstorming a recipe for this post, I learned a lot about the history of this holiday, particularly why we focus on dairy dishes instead of meat. Or, more to the point: What’s with all the blintzes?

What I learned is that Jews are resourceful when they’re hungry. So when we were given the Torah on that fateful Shabbat atop Mount Sinai and instructed to start eating kosher, we didn’t wait until we were allowed to “kasher” our meat and cooking utensils. Instead, we decided to make our first kosher meal a dairy one, using the milk we’d set aside for the animals.

I’m always looking for more opportunities to eat dairy desserts like cheesecake and ice cream, and acknowledging the origin of our religion’s dietary laws is as good a reason as any. Key lime bars are one of my favorite dairy desserts because of their bracing, bright flavor and smooth filling, layered to make a tidy, portable cheesecake. These little squares are so good you’ll want to shout it from the rooftop—or mountaintop, as the case may be.

Key Lime Bars

Makes about 16

Ingredients:

CRUST

  • 1 cup plus 2 Tbsp. finely ground graham crackers
  • 5 Tbsp. butter, melted
  • â…“ cup sugar
  • ½ tsp. salt

 

FILLING

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 Tbsp. grated lime zest
  • Pinch table salt
  • 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ½ cup fresh lime juice

 

Directions:

1. FOR THE CRUST: Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line 8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper and spray generously with cooking spray.

2. Combine graham crackers, butter, sugar, and salt in a medium bowl. Combine until graham cracker crumbs are evenly moistened. Transfer to prepared baking pan and press firmly into bottom of pan. Bake until deeper in color and dry, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer to wire rack and let cool completely.

3. FOR THE FILLING: In large bowl, combine cream cheese, zest, condensed milk, and yolk. Whisk vigorously until smooth. Add lime juice and stir until well combined.

4. Pour filling into crust and use spatula to spread into even layer that reaches to corners of pan. Bake until filling is just set, rotating pan halfway through, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and cool to room temperature on wire rack, then cover with aluminum foil and refrigerate at least 4 hours.

5. Remove from pan, cut into squares, and serve.

Reprinted with permission from JewishBoston.com. 

Mari Levine is a freelance food writer and an editor for America’s Test Kitchen, where she combines her journalism and culinary degrees from Brandeis University and Johnson & Wales, respectively, with her restaurant and lifelong eating experience. When she’s not working hoisin sauce into everything she eats or binging on anything sandwiched between two slices of bread, she can be found on her bike, engrossed in a documentary, or playing sports that involve throwing and/or catching a ball (the latest: flag football).

Za’atar White Bean Salad on Malawach

  

Mother's Day recipe

I love Mother’s Day. I know this might seem like a given but I’ve honestly always loved Mother’s Day. There were definitely a few years there (mainly in my 20s) where it was not on my radar but now that I’m a mother of two, let’s be honest… it’s basically a second birthday and if you know me at all then you KNOW how much I love my birthday.

My husband and I created a little ritual for Mother’s Day (since it’s actually only three short weeks after my birthday) where we don’t get gifts (same goes for Father’s Day) but instead, the parent who is celebrating the day gets to sleep in and choose what we do all day. In addition, instead of paying for an expensive gift, we make a donation to a charity that supports parents and/or children (this is called tzedakah in Hebrew—charitable giving). Because honestly, I don’t really need another pair of earrings or a fancy pair of shoes but I do need to sleep and eat breakfast in bed.

white bean salad

Speaking of breakfast in bed, I recently fell in love with malawach all over again. If you haven’t had this Yemenite delight, now is the time to try it. You can find it in any kosher grocery store and in some major grocery store chains (depending on where you live) in the freezer section. It’s essentially just a delicious, buttery flaky bread that does well when paired with just about anything. And since I LOVE Middle Eastern flavors, I paired it with za’atar, an herby spice blend ubiquitous in Israeli cooking.

If the person you’re honoring on Mother’s Day doesn’t like bread for some strange reason, you can also put this white bean salad on a mixture of fresh leafy greens or even a perfectly roasted sweet potato. I hope you enjoy this recipe and if you do choose to make this Middle Eastern breakfast for the amazing woman helping to raise a kiddo with Judaism in their life, don’t forget to bring her some strong coffee and a flower (or succulents!). Presentation is everything. Happy Mother’s Day!

IngredientsIngredients:

  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 3 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
  • ½ cup finely chopped cilantro
  • â…“  cup plus 3 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • 1 15-ounce can Cannellini beans, rinsed
  • 1 ½ tsp. za’atar spice
  • ½ tsp. coarse kosher salt
  • â…“ cup feta cheese (I prefer goat’s milk feta)
  • 2 sheets of frozen malawach (or crusty bread of choice – toasted)

 

Directions:

1.  Combine shallot and vinegar in a small bowl and let sit 5 minutes.

2.  Meanwhile, mix cilantro and ⅓ of the oil in a large bowl to coat herbs. Add beans, cheese and za’atar and toss to combine. Season generously with salt.

3.  Add shallot mixture to bean mixture and toss gently to combine. Set aside.

4.  Add the remaining oil to a large frying pan set over medium-high heat. Add frozen malawach to the frying pan and immediately reduce the heat to medium, cooking until the bottom is golden brown with large bubbles forming underneath the dough, 2½ to 3 minutes. Flip and cook another 2 to 3 minutes until golden brown all over. Transfer to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel while baking the remaining dough sheet.

5.  Once both of your malawach sheets are done, top with marinated salad and enjoy!

white bean salad on malawach

white bean salad

Frittata Flowers for Mother’s Day

  

On Mother’s Day we celebrate mom and/or any other women in your life who have helped to nourish and care for you. Whether it’s the Italian mom who loves Sunday Supper but your red sauce is ordered in or the Jewish woman who spends Sunday in the kitchen all day cooking and no one is allowed in to your sacred space, on Mother’s Day we want her to sit back and put her feet up for a little while. Let the kids into the kitchen with a parent, caretaker, grandparent, babysitter or friend and let them make brunch.

These Frittatas are easy to make with adult supervision (only needed for a few steps), even if it is just the woman of honor and the kids. She can sit with her feet up in the kitchen and let them take care of most of the steps while she relaxes. Try it. She’ll love it.

Mini Brunch Frittatas

Ask a grown up to help you get these ingredients for your recipe. If you have only the first six ingredients you can still make this recipe. The rest is optional.

Ingredients:

  • 1 red pepper, green pepper, orange pepper OR yellow pepper
  • 8 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup of whole milk, heavy cream or non-dairy milk
  • 1/4 tsp. pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • Vegetable oil or vegetable oil spray
  • 3 Tbsp. of freshly grated Parmesan
  • 3 Tbsp. of grated cheese of your choice: Gruyere, Cheddar, Swiss, Monterey Jack, Gouda, Feta (crumbled instead of grated is OK)
  • 1 small bunch of herbs. Let the kids choose what they like the smell of: basil, parsley, thyme, chives, oregano (they can choose more than one type)
  • Baby spinach

Watch a video on how to make this recipe!

Directions:

1.  Wash your hands. Ask a grown up to turn the oven on to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

2.  Find a big bowl, a cutting board a whisk or a fork, scissors, a 2 cup glass measuring cup with a spout, and a muffin tin.

3. Put the muffin tin into a clean sink and spray each cup with cooking oil or pour a little oil into a cup and brush the inside of each muffin cup with oil on the bottom and up all the sides with a pastry brush.

4.  Tap the egg on the counter near the glass measuring cup. Then over the cup, carefully try to pull the egg apart with your thumbs near the cracked shell. Pull the shell apart and let the egg fall into the measuring cup. If any shell falls in, scoop it out with the egg shell in your hands. Then pour the egg into the big bowl. Do this for all 8 eggs. Pour the 1/2 cup of milk into the big bowl with the eggs. Mix the milk and eggs together with the whisk or fork until the whole mixture is smooth and light yellow.

5.  Grate the Parmesan cheese until you have enough to fill one regular muffin cup. Then grate the same amount of the other cheese. You can measure it right into the muffin tin but then scoop it out and set it aside on a corner of your cutting board.eggs for frittatas

6.  Add the pepper and salt to the egg mixture and stir it all up. Over the sink, pour the egg mixture into your measuring cup. Carefully pour the egg mixture halfway up each muffin cup.

7.  Wash a handful of each herb and a handful of the spinach under cold running water. Then dry the herbs and spinach on a kitchen towel. Herbs with little leaves can just be picked off the stem and put in a pile on your cutting board. The herbs with big leaves can be cut into little strips with your scissors.Cut spinachYou can use your children’s scissors instead of sharp kitchen scissors just make sure they are washed with dish soap and water first. 

8.  Sprinkle the herbs and cheese into the muffin cups on top of the egg mixture. You can leave some plain if you like or make some just with cheese or just with herbs. You make what your family likes. Then, wash the green, yellow, red or orange pepper.

Cut your peppers

…This is the grown up part.

Grown ups: Put the muffin tin in the oven and to set a timer for 10-12 minutes. Ask your little chef for the pepper. Trim the top and take out the core, then slice the pepper into rings. Take the muffin tin out when the timer goes off. The frittatas will look slightly under-cooked in the middle but are just right. If the frittatas are still wet in the middle after a minute out of the oven, put them back in for two more minutes. Using a rubber spatula remove the frittatas from the muffin tin and place them on a plate.

Kids: You get to finish this off. Put some of the rest of the spinach on a large plate or platter. Place the frittatas on top of the spinach and put a pepper ring around each frittata to make them look like flowers. Then it is time to eat and celebrate!

Tips for nervous adults:

Grate your cheese

  • For the cheese, put a fork into a wedge of cheese and the children can hold the fork to grate the cheese, keeping their fingers away from the sharp grater.
  • Put a damp paper towel or kitchen towel under the mixing bowl so it doesn’t slide around while the children are trying to whisk the eggs.
  • Use a larger than usual bowl to help kids avoid splashes over the edges as they mix.
  • Let there be a little mess and trust the kids. If you let them know how to use kitchen tools carefully they will surprise you with their skills.

Frittata flowers!

Mother's Day frittatas

Vegan Funfetti Cheesecake Bites

  

I grew up with Easter baskets, but I didn’t grow up “celebrating” Easter by any means. When I visited dad’s house during Easter time, though, my stepmother would have beautiful Easter baskets prepared for my brother, myself and of course, my half-sister. If you follow me on my blog, Jewhungry, then you know I am the product of a Jewish mother and a Christian father. My parents divorced when I was 4 and I was primarily raised by my Jewish mother and I am an observant Jewish woman today. That said, I have so much respect and gratitude for the experiences from the exposure to Christianity that I had growing up. At the time, I would’ve said I had respect for it because of the awesome Easter baskets and Christmas presents. Now, as a grown woman and mother, I have respect for it because it’s part of my heritage and what brought me to where I am today.

While I toyed with the idea of figuring out how to do a Passover basket, I realized it just wouldn’t be the same. Also, I’m not a huge fan of cultural religious appropriation. However, if I were to put anything in a Passover basket, these cute little funfetti bites would be it. Not all nuts are kosher for Passover, but hazelnuts and cashews are definitely kosher. Plus, they pair beautifully with the dates. And what doesn’t look good with rainbow sprinkles? You also don’t actually bake these guys so, win-win!

I was inspired by the vegan goddess that is Dana over at The Minimalist Baker. If you don’t know her stuff, well, I’m just gonna assume you’ve been in a coma for years because that’s the only conceivable reason I could understand for not knowing her.

I hope this dessert brings you and your loved ones sweet holidays. Happy no baking!

 Vegan Funfetti Cheesecake Bites {No-Bake + GF}

Ingredients:

Crust:

  • 1 cup packed dates, pitted (if dry, soak in warm water for 10 minutes then drain)
  • 1/2 cup hazelnuts
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract
  • Pinch sea salt

 

Filling:

  • 1 1/2 cups raw cashews, quick soaked*
  • 1 large lemon, juiced
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp. full fat coconut milk (see instructions for note)
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 Tbsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (or more) rainbow sprinkles

 

Instructions:

1. Add ingredients for the crust into a food processor and process until a loose dough forms – it should stick together when you squeeze a bit between your fingers. If it’s too dry, add a few more dates through the spout while processing. If too wet, add a few more hazelnuts or almonds.

2. Grease a standard mini muffin tin.

3. Scoop in heaping 1 Tbsp. amounts of crust and press with fingers, making sure to really pack it in there. Set in freezer to firm up.

4. To quick soak cashews, pour boiling hot water over the cashews, soak for 1 hour uncovered, then drain and use as instructed.

5. Add all filling ingredients to a high-speed blender and mix until very smooth. For the coconut milk, I like to scoop the “cream” off the top because it provides a richer texture. But if yours is already all mixed together, just add it in as is. (Pro tip – Put a can of coconut milk right into the fridge as soon as you get home from the grocery store. This will guarantee you have the ‘cream’ on hand for just such an occasion as making raw cheesecake bites!)

6. Blend all filling ingredients for roughly 1 minute or until silky smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.

7. Pour filling into a separate medium size bowl. Add in your sprinkles leaving a handful to the side for sprinkling on top just before freezing.

8. Divide filling evenly among the muffin tins. Tap a few times to release any air bubbles.

9. Evenly disperse the last sprinkles
onto the tops of each cheesecake to create a pretty little topping. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze until hard – about 4-6 hours.

10. Once set, remove by running a butter knife along the sides of the crust. They should pop right out. Let sit for a few minutes so you don’t break your teeth on them. Keep in the freezer for up to 1-2 weeks.

This recipe was reprinted with permission from jewhungrytheblog.com

Matzah Chilaquiles

  

Matzah chilaquiles
If you’ve never heard of chilaquiles, well, you’d basically be me until about three years ago. Shockingly, of all the places I’ve lived and traveled to, I hadn’t heard of this traditional Mexican dish until I moved to Los Angeles in 2014. Not surprising, I fell in love with the flavorful breakfast dish at first taste.

You will absolutely love chilaquiles if you love shakshuka. Stewed tomatoes and eggs are truly a match made in heaven. I honestly don’t understand what took me so long to adapt my favorite chilaquiles recipe for Passover. Shockingly, I’m not a fan of matzah brei (I’m also not a fan of French toast so this makes sense). Matzah chilaquiles is a welcome break from the Passover breakfast staple. My hope is that once you’ve made this recipe, you’ll be a matzah chilaquiles eater too.

Matzah Chilaquiles

Ingredients:

  • 1 28-ounce can of whole tomatoes with juice
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup cilantro and stems
  • 1 small white onion, chopped (saving about 2 Tbsp. worth for garnish)
  • 1 Tbsp. smoked paprika
  • 1 Tbsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 Tbsp. kosher salt
  • 3 Tbsp. canola oil, divided
  • 3 sheets of matzah, coarsely broken up
  • 1 cup shredded cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • cilantro to garnish
  • lime wedges for garnish

 

Runny eggDirections:

1. Preheat oven to a low broil. Combine first eight ingredients into a food processor or
large bowl and, using an immersion blender, blend until coarsely blended.

2. Heat one tablespoon of the oil in a large, heavy nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, and add 3/4 of the tomato puree and cook, stirring, for roughly 10 minutes, until the sauce darkens and thickens. Season to taste with salt.

3. Turn the heat to low, and simmer, stirring often, for about five minutes, until the sauce coats the front and back of a spoon. Taste and adjust salt.

4. Add broken-up pieces of matzah to a large mixing bowl. Cover with the cooked tomato puree. Stir until all pieces of matzah are combined.

5. Return half of the covered matzah to the skillet. Flatten and cover with half of the shredded cheese. Top that with the rest of your covered matzah, cover with the last quarter of your tomato puree and the rest of your cheese.

6. Place the skillet of your cheesy, tomato matzah in the oven and broil until cheese is golden and melted, 4–5 minutes.

7. Meanwhile, pour the last tablespoon of oil into a nonstick skillet to lightly coat. Heat over medium heat. Add eggs and fry until whites are set but yolks are still runny, about 4 minutes.

8. Top chilaquiles with chopped onion, cilantro and lime wedges. Top with fried eggs and serve with remaining sauce alongside.

Matzah chilaquiles

 

The Passover Kugel Stack

  

Kugel Stack Completed

We all know so many ways to use up Thanksgiving leftovers, but the recipes are few and far between when it comes to Passover leftovers. Here is a tasty way to use up what’s left after your seder. You can make this recipe from scratch, but it’s better with leftovers. If you want meat, you can keep it kosher by skipping the cheese. Add in some of the seder horseradish to give it some spice. You can make your stacks as high or low as you like. I like to have four layers. Whether you stack them high or low, they will be delicious!

Kugel Stack

Ingredients:

  • leftover potato kugel, chilled overnight
  • leftover roasted or steamed asparagus, green beans or other green vegetables
  • leftover tsimmes or one baked sweet potato
  • 10 oz. pack of white mushrooms, cleaned and finely chopped (or leftover brisket if you’re using meat)
  • one small shallot
  • 2-3 Tbsp. vegetable oil
  • fresh mozzarella, sliced (if you’re doing dairy)
  • a pinch of kosher salt

Slices of kugel ready to be crisped in a pan.

Directions:

1. Slice your chilled kugel evenly. The amount of kugel you have left over will determine how many stacks you can make.

2. In a pan, heat the vegetable oil. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the slices of kugel and cook until golden brown on both sides. Set the slices aside on a plate while you prepare the other ingredients.

3. Finely chop the shallot. If needed, add a little extra vegetable oil to the pan that you cooked the kugel in. Sauté the shallots over medium-low heat.

4. Toss the mushrooms in with the shallots and turn the heat to medium-high. Once the liquid begins to cook off of the mushrooms and they begin to brown, add a pinch of salt. This is your mushroom duxelles. If you prefer, you can use the leftover brisket instead and skip the mozzarella on top.

5. Turn the broiler on and make sure your rack is low enough that the stack has room to sit under the broiler. On a baking pan lined with foil, place one slice of kugel. Top that with a row of sliced asparagus or green beans. Top that with another piece of kugel and a spoonful of mushroom duxelles (or a piece of brisket). Top with another slice of kugel and add a spoonful of tsimmes or a slice of sweet potato. Top with a final piece of potato kugel and add a slice of mozzarella. Leave the cheese off if you are using brisket. If you need a toothpick or skewer to stabilize the stack, you can push one into the kugel stack being careful that it is not right under the broiler.

6. Place the stack under the broiler until the cheese begins to bubble and brown. Enjoy!