The Passover Kugel Stack

  

Kugel Stack Completed

We all know so many ways to use up Thanksgiving leftovers, but the recipes are few and far between when it comes to Passover leftovers. Here is a tasty way to use up what’s left after your seder. You can make this recipe from scratch, but it’s better with leftovers. If you want meat, you can keep it kosher by skipping the cheese. Add in some of the seder horseradish to give it some spice. You can make your stacks as high or low as you like. I like to have four layers. Whether you stack them high or low, they will be delicious!

Kugel Stack

Ingredients:

  • leftover potato kugel, chilled overnight
  • leftover roasted or steamed asparagus, green beans or other green vegetables
  • leftover tsimmes or one baked sweet potato
  • 10 oz. pack of white mushrooms, cleaned and finely chopped (or leftover brisket if you’re using meat)
  • one small shallot
  • 2-3 Tbsp. vegetable oil
  • fresh mozzarella, sliced (if you’re doing dairy)
  • a pinch of kosher salt

Slices of kugel ready to be crisped in a pan.

Directions:

1. Slice your chilled kugel evenly. The amount of kugel you have left over will determine how many stacks you can make.

2. In a pan, heat the vegetable oil. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the slices of kugel and cook until golden brown on both sides. Set the slices aside on a plate while you prepare the other ingredients.

3. Finely chop the shallot. If needed, add a little extra vegetable oil to the pan that you cooked the kugel in. Sauté the shallots over medium-low heat.

4. Toss the mushrooms in with the shallots and turn the heat to medium-high. Once the liquid begins to cook off of the mushrooms and they begin to brown, add a pinch of salt. This is your mushroom duxelles. If you prefer, you can use the leftover brisket instead and skip the mozzarella on top.

5. Turn the broiler on and make sure your rack is low enough that the stack has room to sit under the broiler. On a baking pan lined with foil, place one slice of kugel. Top that with a row of sliced asparagus or green beans. Top that with another piece of kugel and a spoonful of mushroom duxelles (or a piece of brisket). Top with another slice of kugel and add a spoonful of tsimmes or a slice of sweet potato. Top with a final piece of potato kugel and add a slice of mozzarella. Leave the cheese off if you are using brisket. If you need a toothpick or skewer to stabilize the stack, you can push one into the kugel stack being careful that it is not right under the broiler.

6. Place the stack under the broiler until the cheese begins to bubble and brown. Enjoy!

Pre-Passover Fridge-Clean-Out Pasta

  

Skillet Pasta baked with cheeseTeam! It’s getting down to the wire! That’s right . . . Passover is right around the corner. My local kosher grocer has put up the outside tent and is changing all the labels on their shelves and covering up the non-kosher-for-Passover stuff like it’s some sort of eye sore. As the first night seder approaches, I’m already starting the process of cleaning out my cabinets of pasta and other delicious goodies that are a “no-no” during Passover.

I’m constantly in search of a quick, yet delicious dinner to serve on a busy weeknight PLUS I need to get rid of my pasta, so I decided to try my hand at a skillet pasta dish and I’m SO glad I did! The recipe below can be adapted to add anything you like—I used frozen veggies to help clean out the freezer and half boxes of pasta to help clean out my cupboard. What I love about this dish is that it offers a cheesy, delicious meal, plus it helps clean my house, so…win-win!

Fridge-Clean-Out Skillet Pasta

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups uncooked penne or corkscrew pasta
  • ​​​​​​1 cup frozen broccoli
  • 1 cup frozen sliced mushrooms
  • 3 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 3 cloves of garlic, finely diced
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 jar favorite marinara sauce
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 tsp. Maldon salt
  • 1 tsp. black pepper

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 425° F. In a medium pot of salted boiling water, add entire box pasta plus the frozen broccoli and mushrooms. Cook together until pasta is just shy of al dente, about 2 minutes less than the package cooking time. Drain, then transfer pasta and veggies to a large mixing bowl. Add 3/4 of the sauce to the pasta and veggies. Set aside.

2. Add olive oil to an ovenproof skillet and cook over medium-high heat. Once smoking, add onions and cook until translucent. Add garlic and cook for another minute. Turn off heat and add pasta to the skillet. Stir to combine pasta and veggies with the onions and garlic. Using a spatula, flatten the pasta so it lays evenly. Add the rest of the sauce to the pasta and evenly top with the cheese. Place skillet in the upper third of the oven. Cook until cheese is brown and bubbly, about 8 – 10 minutes.

Guinness Challah for St. Patty’s Day

  

By Mari Levine

challah

I know the obvious connection between Jews and St. Patrick’s Day is corned beef. But that seemed like the safe choice for this week’s post, and I was feeling adventurous. I was also feeling like drinking beer.

So when I googled “Jewish recipes for St. Patrick’s Day,” I wasn’t expecting much besides the aforementioned corned beef recipes and maybe some random tips on how to incorporate green food coloring into traditional Jewish dishes. But the luck of the Irish was with me. In the middle of my search—as if sent from a leprechaun himself—a dear friend sent me an email with the subject line, “Jewish take on St. Patty’s.” She had sent me a link to a recent post on a blog called She Makes and Bakes, in which the blogger had introduced her recipe for Guinness challah. Um, genius.

I love cooking with beer. (I’ve made this beer ice cream recipe several times and it’s always a huge hit.) But I’d never tried baking with it—and I’m not a confident baker to begin with. So for my version, I decided to use a trusted recipe as the base—Claudia Roden’s challah recipe from “The Book of Jewish Food”—and work Guinness into it as part of the liquid in which you dissolve the yeast.

This worked really nicely. The challah has no hint of booziness (I might use all beer next time instead of cutting it with water, or even reduce it to concentrate its flavors), but the Guinness certainly lends the challah a pronounced sweetness.

And if you’re worried about people missing the St. Patrick’s Day connection to challah, there’s always green food coloring.

Guinness Challah

Inspired by She Makes and Bakes and Claudia Roden’s challah recipe in “The Book of Jewish Food”

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. active dry yeast
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1ÂĽ cups lukewarm water
  • 1ÂĽ cups Guinness
  • ½ cup vegetable oil
  • 5 eggs
  • 2 Tbsp. salt
  • 9ÂĽ cups flour
  • Poppy or sesame seeds (optional)

 

Directions:

1. In medium bowl, stir together water and Guinness. Dissolve yeast and 1 tablespoon of sugar in water-beer mixture and set aside until foamy, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, grease a large bowl and two baking sheets with cooking spray and set aside.

2. Using a kitchen spoon or stand mixer, beat 4 of the eggs in another large bowl, then beat in salt, remaining sugar, and ½ cup oil. Add yeast mixture and beat until well combined. Gradually add flour, mixing until dough is stiff.

3. Using dough hook or your hands, knead dough until smooth, about 15 minutes. Shape dough into a ball and transfer to prepared bowl. Cover with a damp kitchen towel or plastic wrap and set aside, in a warm spot, to let rise until doubled in bulk, about 1½ hours.

4. Turn dough out onto a very lightly floured surface, divide into 12 equal pieces, and shape each into a ball. Set dough balls aside about 2 inches apart, cover with a damp kitchen towel or plastic wrap, and let rise for 10 minutes. Then roll dough balls into 12-inch long ropes.

5. To make the six-strand braided loaves, line up six of the ropes lengthwise on each large baking sheet, or, to make the three-strand braided loaves, line up three of the ropes lengthwise on each medium baking sheet. Position baking sheets perpendicular to you. Join ends of ropes at top of baking sheet and pinch together. Braid each loaf, join ends of rope at bottom of baking sheet, pinch together, and tuck ends under on both ends of loaves. Loosely cover loaves with damp kitchen towels or plastic wrap and let rise for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees and set oven rack in middle position.

6. Beat the remaining egg and 1 teaspoon water together in a small bowl. Brush tops of loaves with some of the egg wash, sprinkle with poppy and sesame seeds (if using), then bake until loaves are deep brown and hollow sounding when tapped, 45-60 minutes. Set loaves aside on rack to cool.

Reprinted with permission from JewishBoston.com.