French Apple Root Vegetable Hash with Honey Drizzle

  

French Apple Root Vegetable Hash with Honey DrizzleThis version of vegetable hash can be served as a side dish or enjoyed as a full meal. The apples and honey for Rosh Hashanah represent a sweet new year while the flavors are French inspired with shallots and classic French herbs. For your seasoning, enjoy a taste of France with a classic herb mix such as herbes de Provence or use tarragon, which is often used in French cooking.

French Apple Root Vegetable Hash with Honey Drizzle

Ingredients:

(serves 4 as a meal and 6 as a side dish)

  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil such as canola oil
  • 2 medium sized baking potatoes
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 small shallot
  • 1/2 red pepper
  • 1 apple, Granny Smith or Golden Delicious are best
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh herbs, or 1 tsp. of dried herbs
  • 2 tsp. honey
  • salt
  • pepper
  • French cheeses (soft goat cheese or grated ComtĂ©), optional

 

Directions:

1. Peel the potatoes and cut them into a small dice. Rinse the potatoes thoroughly and dry them on a clean kitchen towel.

diced potatoes drying

2. Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan for a minute or two over medium high heat. Add in the potatoes and fry until golden brown. You will need to turn the potatoes with a spoon or spatula to cook on all sides.

3. While the potatoes are crisping, peel and dice the carrot and parsnip and chop the shallot finely. Once the potatoes are golden brown, remove them from the pan and set them aside on a plate. In the same pan, toss the shallots in the leftover oil and cook for a minute, then add the diced carrots and parsnips. Cook for two more minutes.

diced vegetables

4. While the root vegetables cook, dice the red pepper. Peel and dice the apple. Note: I like to have the apple diced slightly larger than the root vegetables to highlight it. Toss the red pepper and apple in with the rest of the vegetables and add salt and pepper to taste. If you are using dried herbs, sprinkle 1 tsp. of herbes de Provence in now. Add the potatoes back into the pan and stir it all together. Remove the hash to a serving dish. If you are using fresh herbs, mince them.

5. Top with a drizzle of honey and, if you are using fresh herbs, sprinkle them on top of the hash. You can use as much as a whole Tbsp. or less to taste. If you are serving this as a main course, I suggest adding some crumbled goat cheese or grated Comté cheese. For breakfast, you can top it with a fried egg.

Challah With a Twist: Scallion Pancake Challah

  

By Molly Yeh

Scallion challah bread by Molly Yeh

Reprinted with permission from Molly Yeh, adapted from MyJewishLearning.

I enjoy being a Chinese Jew. I eat plenty of matzah balls and potstickers and I get to celebrate three New Years.

I’ve often had to convince people that I’m Jewish, which is amusing and usually results in a new friend feeling like they can connect with me better due to a shared religion. Other than that, I can’t say I really thought about what it meant to Chinese and Jewish while I was growing up.

I recently moved out to rural North Dakota with my Norwegian husband, population six Jews and about 10,000 Scandinavian descendants. Things are quiet here, people are Midwestern nice, and the small town life is pretty darn wonderful.

For the first time in my life, I feel a bit like an oddball, in a sea of light-haired Lutherans, but people embrace me when I introduce them to challah. North Dakotans love challah! And I love their food too, like Lefse and dessert bars of all sorts.

All of my challah here is homemade. As are my latkes, kugel, matzah balls… you get the picture. There’s not a deli in sight. Not even a bagel. I do miss bopping down to Zabar’s for babka and bagels, but on the other hand, with the necessity to make everything from scratch comes the opportunity to put my own spin on things and mash up my Chinese/Jewish/Midwesternness.

Brisket in my potstickers, ginger sugar beet latkes, egg rolls with home cured pastrami from a cow that I’ll one day raise…

I’m getting carried away.

But this recipe is me in bread form! Chinese, Jewish and pretty doughy, whether I can help it or not. Inspired by the scallion pancake, here is an Asian twist on my all-time favorite challah.

Scallion Pancake Challah

Makes one large loaf

Basic challah dough

Based on Food 52’s Recipe

  • 1 Tbsp. instant yeast
  • 3/4 cups warm water
  • 2 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. sugar
  • 3 cups flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • 1/3 cups vegetable or canola oil
  • 2 eggs

 

Filling and Topping

  • 1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil
  • 2-3 stalks scallions or green onions, minced
  • salt, pepper, and red chili flakes to taste
  • Egg wash: 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water
  • A few pinches of toasted sesame seeds and black sesame seeds

 

Directions

1.  In a small bowl, proof yeast in 1/2 cup warm water mixed with 1 tsp. of sugar.

2. While yeast is proofing, mix flour, salt, and remaining 2 Tbsp. of sugar in a large bowl.

3. In a medium bowl, mix remaining 1/4 cup of water, honey, oil and eggs.

4. Once yeast has finished proofing, add it to the flour, followed by the wet ingredients. Mix with a large wooden spoon until dough becomes too thick to stir. Empty dough onto well-floured surface and knead by hand. Knead dough until smooth and no longer sticky, adding flour as needed.

5. Transfer to an oiled bowl and cover with a damp towel. Let rise for about two hours, or until doubled in size.

6. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

7. Divide dough into three equal parts and then roll each part into a 1-foot log. Gently flatten each log so that it is about 3 inches wide.

8. Brush each with toasted sesame oil and then sprinkle with salt, pepper, chili flakes, and scallions. Roll them up lengthwise like a jellyroll, and then braid.

9. Place the loaf on a parchment-lined baking sheet and then brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds and black pepper.

10. Bake for 20-25 minutes until the top is golden brown and the challah is cooked through.

Sweet Wine Slushies

  

sweet wine slushie

This recipe contains alcohol and is for those of legal drinking age only.

Introduce your loved ones to good ol’ fashioned Manischewitz, and reinvent the Jewish holiday staple into the dessert it was always meant to be. This way, you can avoid getting any looks that say “You drink this stuff?” or, “Is this what all Jewish wine is like?” Your loved ones will instead wonder why you’ve been hiding this Manischewitz stuff from them all this time. L’chaim! Cheers!

Ingredients:

1 cup sweet kosher wine

1 1/2 cups pear nectar

2-inch piece of ginger

1 lime, zested

1 Tbsp. sugar

Directions:

1. Slice ginger, add to pot with pear nectar and heat on stove, reducing to 1 cup (25 minutes)

2. Strain out the ginger pieces and add the wine to the juice. Pour mixture into a glass baking dish and freeze for one hour.

3. Remove from freezer and using a fork, scrape the slush off the bottom of the dish. Repeat one to two times, freezing for 30 minute increments.

4. Once it’s frozen to desired slushiness, zest your lime and mix it with the sugar. Scoop out your slushie and top with lime sugar.