Za’atar White Bean Salad on Malawach

  

Mother's Day recipe

I love Mother’s Day. I know this might seem like a given but I’ve honestly always loved Mother’s Day. There were definitely a few years there (mainly in my 20s) where it was not on my radar but now that I’m a mother of two, let’s be honest… it’s basically a second birthday and if you know me at all then you KNOW how much I love my birthday.

My husband and I created a little ritual for Mother’s Day (since it’s actually only three short weeks after my birthday) where we don’t get gifts (same goes for Father’s Day) but instead, the parent who is celebrating the day gets to sleep in and choose what we do all day. In addition, instead of paying for an expensive gift, we make a donation to a charity that supports parents and/or children (this is called tzedakah in Hebrew—charitable giving). Because honestly, I don’t really need another pair of earrings or a fancy pair of shoes but I do need to sleep and eat breakfast in bed.

white bean salad

Speaking of breakfast in bed, I recently fell in love with malawach all over again. If you haven’t had this Yemenite delight, now is the time to try it. You can find it in any kosher grocery store and in some major grocery store chains (depending on where you live) in the freezer section. It’s essentially just a delicious, buttery flaky bread that does well when paired with just about anything. And since I LOVE Middle Eastern flavors, I paired it with za’atar, an herby spice blend ubiquitous in Israeli cooking.

If the person you’re honoring on Mother’s Day doesn’t like bread for some strange reason, you can also put this white bean salad on a mixture of fresh leafy greens or even a perfectly roasted sweet potato. I hope you enjoy this recipe and if you do choose to make this Middle Eastern breakfast for the amazing woman helping to raise a kiddo with Judaism in their life, don’t forget to bring her some strong coffee and a flower (or succulents!). Presentation is everything. Happy Mother’s Day!

IngredientsIngredients:

  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 3 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
  • ½ cup finely chopped cilantro
  • â…“  cup plus 3 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
  • 1 15-ounce can Cannellini beans, rinsed
  • 1 ½ tsp. za’atar spice
  • ½ tsp. coarse kosher salt
  • â…“ cup feta cheese (I prefer goat’s milk feta)
  • 2 sheets of frozen malawach (or crusty bread of choice – toasted)

 

Directions:

1.  Combine shallot and vinegar in a small bowl and let sit 5 minutes.

2.  Meanwhile, mix cilantro and ⅓ of the oil in a large bowl to coat herbs. Add beans, cheese and za’atar and toss to combine. Season generously with salt.

3.  Add shallot mixture to bean mixture and toss gently to combine. Set aside.

4.  Add the remaining oil to a large frying pan set over medium-high heat. Add frozen malawach to the frying pan and immediately reduce the heat to medium, cooking until the bottom is golden brown with large bubbles forming underneath the dough, 2½ to 3 minutes. Flip and cook another 2 to 3 minutes until golden brown all over. Transfer to a plate and cover with a kitchen towel while baking the remaining dough sheet.

5.  Once both of your malawach sheets are done, top with marinated salad and enjoy!

white bean salad on malawach

white bean salad

Double Chocolate Mint Hamentaschen

  

Hamentaschen recipe

Purim is one of the most accessible Jewish holidays to celebrate. Like Halloween, a big part of it is dressing up and being silly. (All-night reading of The Scroll of Esther and lots of drinking are the other parts.) Unlike Halloween, there’s a beautiful part of Purim that involves the giving of gifts to friends and tzedakah (charity) to the poor. If you’re just dipping your toes in the holiday for the first time, a great way to celebrate is with delicious food. Hamentaschen, symbolizing Haman’s hat, from the story of Purim (which has an interfaith story line), are cookies traditionally made with jam or poppy seed filling, but who doesn’t love chocolate?

I was inspired to do a hamantaschen based on my favorite Girl Scout cookie, the Thin Mint. It focuses on that sweet, decadent chocolate and the mint is brought in via a subtle peppermint glaze. And, if peppermint isn’t your thing, just leave it out and you have yourself a delicious chocolate hamantaschen that will please all your friends and family and maybe just introduce the holiday of Purim to a newcomer.

unbaked hamentaschen

Ingredients:

Makes 2 dozen (give or take a couple)

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup oil
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 3 tsp. baking powder
  • 6 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon strong coffee
  • 1/4 – 1/2 cup large chocolate chips (semi sweet or milk will work. I used milk chocolate)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/4 tsp peppermint oil
  • 3 tablespoons milk

Instructions:

1. Preheat Oven: 350°F

2. In a medium mixing bowl, mix together eggs, oil, sugar and vanilla.

3. Next, add baking powder and flour to the bowl and mix well to combine. Finally, add the cocoa and strong coffee and give it one more good stir (dough should be thick, almost like bread dough).

4. Knead the dough until smooth.

5. Flour a rolling pin and roll out to roughly 1/8 inch thin on a floured board.

6. Using a round cookie cutter or a drinking glass with a wide opening, cut out circles (use the scraps to make cookies as well, just keep forming into a large ball and rolling out thin and repeat process until dough is done).

7. Drop a handful of chocolate chips (should be roughly 10 chips or more) into the center of each circle.

8. Have a glass or small bowl of a little bit of cold water near by so that you can dip your fingers in to help fold the dough into three sides over the filling forming a triangle (water acts as a glue to the dough and will help edges stick).

9. Bake at 350°F for 15 minutes on a lined cookie sheet.

10. Once fully cooked, let cool for at least 5 – 10 minutes. While cooling, place the powdered sugar, peppermint oil and milk into a small bowl and stir until milky consistency.

11. Once the cookies are cool, brush the sugar/oil mixture over the tops.

Hamentaschen ready to bake

Glaze the hamentaschen

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