Sha-barbecue Cilantro, Lime & Yogurt Chicken Wings

  

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Gang, summer is coming to an end! We need to embrace all of its delights as much as we can, including swimming and eating as much ice cream as possible, because that’s what summer’s about, right? I think we should also embrace the later Shabbat start times, and one of my favorite ways to do this is by hosting a “Sha-barbecue”! The first time I enjoyed a Sha-barbecue was almost 10 years ago when I was living in Chicago. I was invited over to my friend Taron’s place for Shabbat dinner. When I asked him what I could bring, he casually said, “Well, it’s a Sha-barbecue, so maybe some guacamole and chips?” I loved how casually he said Sha-barbecue, like it was a thing everyone knew about the world over. But never in my whole Jewish life had I heard of or attended a Sha-barbecue! Ever since that fateful night, I have fully embraced the Sha-barbecue. With Shabbat not starting until almost 8 in the summer, I’ve found that as a religiously observant Jew it’s easy to have friends over and enjoy some adult beverages while barbecuing up the main course and then sitting down to a lovely Sha-barbecue meal. You know, like our forefathers and mothers used to do!

Sha-barbecue Cilantro, Lime and Yogurt Chicken Wings

Ingredients:

  • 12 whole chicken wings, tips trimmed and discarded
  • 1 Tbsp. kosher salt
  • ½ Tbsp. pepper
  • ½ Tbsp. sweet paprika
  • ½ Tbsp. cumin
  • ½ Tbsp. garlic powderwings 4

 

Marinade:

  • 1 cup coconut-milk yogurt (plain)
  • 4 key limes, juiced
  • ½ bunch cilantro, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. kosher salt
  • ½ Tbsp. smoked paprika

 

For serving:

  • Maldon sea salt
  • 1 lime, cut into wedges

 

Directions:

1. Wash and dry the chicken wings, making sure they are free of any feathers. Next, separate drumettes from wingettes by slicing a sharp knife through the joints.

2. Place the chicken wings in a medium bowl. Add the cumin, sweet paprika, garlic powder, kosher salt and pepper. Toss to coat the wings.

3. In a separate, larger bowl, add all the ingredients for the marinade. Stir to combine, tasting for adjustments in seasoning.

4. Once marinade is complete, place the prepared chicken wings into the marinade bowl,wings stirring to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and marinate for at least 1 hour and up to 6 hours, making sure not to over-marinate, as the recipe includes lime juice, which can break down the meat (and not in a good way).

5. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line two large rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.

6. Using tongs, gently place the wings on the prepared baking sheets, making sure to spread them evenly so they aren’t overlapping. Don’t toss out the remaining marinade, as you will be basting while it bakes.

7. Bake wings for roughly 20 minutes. After the initial 20 minutes, baste each wing with remaining marinade. Bake for another 20-25 minutes, or until cooked through.

8. Sprinkle cooked wings with Maldon sea salt and a squeeze of lime just before serving.

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Indian Grilled Chicken with Cilantro Mint Sauce

  

Indian chicken chutney

Chicken is a mainstay in most Jewish homes. We love our chicken stock (homemade or store-bought and doctored will do) for matzah ball soup. You’ll find chopped chicken livers at the holiday table because every family has those who love it among the haters. For Shabbat, a nice roasted chicken kicks off the weekend and the Sabbath. But when you always cook with the same ingredient it is easy to get in a rut. The good news is that it isn’t that hard to get out of it! Just add a little spice. This summer, go Indian with this Indian spiced grilled chicken served with a cilantro mint sauce. For interfaith families with Indian backgrounds, this is a great way to fuse your cultures!

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Indian chicken, uncookedIngredients:

  • fresh ginger, 1 inch knob
  • zest and juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tsp. of salt
  • 1 tsp. of Garam Masala
  • 1/2 tsp. of fennel seeds
  • 1/4 cup of vegetable oil
  • 4 chicken thighs, skin on and bone in

Mint

Cilantro Mint Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of mint
  • 2 cups of cilantro
  • 1 large shallot
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1 tsp. of white sugar
  • 1 tsp. of salt
  • 1/2 jalapeño, minced

Directions:

1.  Into a large bowl, grate the ginger. Add the zest and juice of 1 lime, salt, Garam Masala (an Indian spice mix that can be found at most grocery stores) and fennel seeds (I like to buy whole seeds and toast them on a pan on the stove and then crush them with a mortar and pestle). Pour in vegetable oil and mix together.

Toss the chicken into the marinade and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes to an hour. 

2.  Meanwhile, prepare the sauce. Wash and dry the cilantro and mint. You can use a salad spinner or dry the herbs on a towel. They do not have to be bone dry. In a blender, add the mint, cilantro, shallot cut into quarters, the juice of 1 lime, water, sugar and salt. Puree the mixture.  

3.  Carefully slice a jalapeño in half, remove the inner seeds and mince the pepper. Stir the tiny pieces of pepper into the sauce.

4.  Take the chicken out of the fridge so it can lose some of the chill. Then, pre-heat your grill. Cook the chicken on a medium heat grill until done. Timing varies based on size of the chicken pieces, so just refer to your meat thermometer for doneness. Or, cut into the chicken to see that the meat is opaque and the juices run clear.

Serve with delicious summer vegetables.

CSA Peanut Cabbage Slaw

  

Cabbage slaw

As the mercury creeps ever higher on the thermometer, the last thing I want to do is turn on the oven and counteract my hardworking air conditioner. Luckily, we’ve been members of a CSA for the last several years (most recently Red Fire Farm in Granby, MA) and so every week I pick up a huge haul of delicious, organic, sometimes unfamiliar, and sometimes in abundance, veggies.

One of the items we’ve tended to get the most of is cabbage. Napa cabbage, red cabbage, savoy cabbage… lots of cabbage! I was a little intimidated by all these leafy vegetables initially, and opted for cooking up one of my favorite comfort foods–stuffed cabbage. But it takes forever, it’s a little complicated and it requires my summer foe: the oven! I’m not a lover of typical cole slaw as I really don’t like mayonnaise, but a friend’s girlfriend introduced me to a recipe for a peanut slaw a few years back that I’ve worked to recreate. It has since become a summer staple around here.

It’s a great dish to bring to a BBQ or potluck, or to just make a huge batch of and keep in the fridge. It’s especially versatile as it doesn’t contain any dairy or meat so it pairs well with most meals, and without the mayo it’s safe to be out of the fridge for awhile.

Here’s the recipe for what’s sure to become a new favorite in your family as well.

Crunchy Peanut Slaw

1 big bowl of slaw, serves at least 8

Cabbage slaw ingredientsIngredients:

  • 1 medium head green cabbage, outer leaves removed (I prefer Napa Cabbage for this, but anything that comes in your CSA works)
  • 1 1/2 cups roasted, unsalted peanuts (half finely chopped, half whole)
  • 1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced, green and white parts
  • 1 cup chopped cilantro (about two big handfuls unchopped)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

 

Dressing:

  • 1/2 cup light oil, like canola
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar (or more, to taste)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce (or more, to taste)

 

Directions:

Cutting cabbage1.  Shred the cabbage very finely. The fineness of the shredded cabbage is really what makes this salad; you want it in in threads, almost, and with the threads chopped into bite-size lengths.

2.  Toss with the peanuts, cilantro and green onion in a large bowl.

Mix the ingredients3.  Whisk the dressing until emulsified, then taste and adjust to your own preference of sweetness and saltiness. You can also add a pinch of red pepper flakes if you like a little spice.

4.  Toss with the cabbage. Garnish with a few more peanuts and green onions and serve.

 

 

 

Dress the slaw

I know that some people HATE cilantro, and in that case, you can substitute a combination of flat leaf parsley and mint. If you’re dealing with a peanut allergy, you can substitute other nuts, or if you’re avoiding nuts altogether, add some shredded carrots for color and sweetness.

You’ll need a large, very sharp knife for this recipe, a good and stable cutting board and a salad spinner, because while organic fruits and veggies are wonderful, they’re often dirty! My favorite method for cleaning greens is to finely chop them and then soak in a large bowl of cold water, then remove to the salad spinner for a vigorous spin, always a fun job for kids!

Eating the slaw