Blueberry and Apple Borekas with Honey Tahini

  

Blueberry and Apple Borekas

It’s probably a bit of a stretch to call these borekas because I originally introduced them to my readers as one of our favorite savory Turkish bites. And it’s not every day you think of sweet borekas. Truth be told, I am a savory lover at heart. But this once city girl, who now lives within minutes of farmland—driving by horses, cows, dairy farms and wild apple trees—counts her blessings and happily picks blueberries at a nearby farm.

Whether we’ll call them borekas or not, these little pastries are fast, easy and perfectly sweet for the Jewish New Year. And as a perfect finger food for a Yom Kippur break fast, I made blueberry and apple borekas with a sweet tahini honey glaze.

Another usual savory bite, tahini is an ingredient I use for just about everything: dressings, dips and spreads, and naturally don’t see it used as a sweet ingredient. Tahini is mixed with a bit of honey and warm water and with a bit of elbow grease, turns into a beautiful pour-able consistency.

Wishing you a wonderful and sweet New Year and an easy fast! L’shana Tovah!

Blueberry and Apple Borekas with Honey Tahini
Yields 18 borekas

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of chopped and peeled apples, cut into about 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 4 Tbsp. sugar + more sugar for sprinkling on top
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract/paste or 1 vanilla bean, scraped
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced and zested
  • 1 package (2 sheets) puff pastry, thawed
  • Flour for dusting on surface
  • 1 egg + water for egg wash

 

Tahini Glaze:

  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • 1/4-1/2 cup warm water

 

Directions:

1. First make the filling. In a bowl, add together the cubed apples, blueberries, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and lemon zest and juice. Toss everything together and allow to sit while you prepare the puff pastry.

2. Unfold puff pastry on a floured surface and roll out a bit so the pastry is a bit thinner.

3. Then cut pastry sheet into nine even squares (18 total for both sheets) and add about a tablespoon of filling to each square.

4. Whisk together the egg and water in a small bowl and brush the edges of each square with the egg wash and then folding the dough together making a little pouch. Use your fingers or a fork to crimp the edges and it’s OK if you stretch the dough a bit, the fruit will shrink as it bakes.

5. Brush more egg wash on top of the folded pastry and sprinkle with more sugar. Use a knife to cut little skits on the top.

6. Place borekas on lined baking sheet and bake at 325° for 20-25 minutes, or until the filling begins to ooze out and the pastry is golden brown.

7. Once done, remove from the oven and allow to cool a bit while you make tahini glaze.

8. To make the tahini glaze, in a bowl add the tahini and honey and 1/4 cup warm water. Use a fork or whisk to whisk everything together until it is smooth and pour-able. As it sits, it will get firmer so you can add a bit more warm water and mix until desired consistency.

Pumpkin Spice Monkey Bread with Applesauce Glaze

  

Breakfast is one of my favorite meals because every dish has a comfort food vibe. For Yom Kippur, I love preparing a “break fast” meal with some family favorites like noodle kugel and bagels and lox. We make dishes that are easy to digest and gentle on the stomach after a day of fasting. I also like to add in something new every year. Pumpkin spice craze is here to stay so I decided to take a classic monkey bread, which is also known as Hungarian coffee cake, and pumpkin spice it up! If you have any Hungarian roots in your family, this is a great time to add your heritage to the celebration of the Jewish New Year. This recipe uses pre-made biscuit dough for ease and speed, but you can also use your own scratch recipe.

Pumpkin Spice Monkey Bread with Apple Sauce Glaze

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 stick of butter, plus extra to grease the pan
  • 1/2 cup of granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp. pumpkin spice
  • 1 Tbsp. maple syrup
  • 1 package of pre-made flaky biscuit dough (the ones that come in a cardboard tube)
  • 2 apples
  • 1/2 lemon
  • 1 cup powdered sugar

 

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a small loaf pan or 6-inch square baking dish.

2. Mix the sugar, cinnamon and pumpkin spice.

3. Melt the stick of butter and add in the maple syrup.

4. Take each pre-made biscuit dough and cut it into two pieces. Roll the pieces one at a time in the butter and then the pumpkin spice sugar mixture.

5. Place each ball into the baking dish until you have one layer of sugar and pumpkin spice coated balls of dough. If using a small loaf pan, you will have two layers of dough balls and will cook for longer.

6. Bake for 40-50 minutes until the dough has risen and is a deep golden brown.

7. While the pumpkin spice monkey bread is baking, peel and grate both apples. Cook the apples in a covered saucepan until soft and fragrant.

8. Pour the apple sauce into a bowl and add a squeeze of lemon juice. Stir in 1 cup of powdered sugar.
9. Serve the monkey bread warm with the apple sauce glaze on the side.

Sweet Wine Slushies

  

sweet wine slushie

This recipe contains alcohol and is for those of legal drinking age only.

Introduce your loved ones to good ol’ fashioned Manischewitz, and reinvent the Jewish holiday staple into the dessert it was always meant to be. This way, you can avoid getting any looks that say “You drink this stuff?” or, “Is this what all Jewish wine is like?” Your loved ones will instead wonder why you’ve been hiding this Manischewitz stuff from them all this time. L’chaim! Cheers!

Ingredients:

1 cup sweet kosher wine

1 1/2 cups pear nectar

2-inch piece of ginger

1 lime, zested

1 Tbsp. sugar

Directions:

1. Slice ginger, add to pot with pear nectar and heat on stove, reducing to 1 cup (25 minutes)

2. Strain out the ginger pieces and add the wine to the juice. Pour mixture into a glass baking dish and freeze for one hour.

3. Remove from freezer and using a fork, scrape the slush off the bottom of the dish. Repeat one to two times, freezing for 30 minute increments.

4. Once it’s frozen to desired slushiness, zest your lime and mix it with the sugar. Scoop out your slushie and top with lime sugar.

Black + White Creamsicles

  

Aside from the smell of tuna fish, nothing can really transport me to a New York Jewish deli like a black and white cookie. Just the mere sight of of the cookie transports me to a Shabbat luncheon in which I’m elbow-ing the person to the left and right of me (and sometimes behind me) in an attempt to get my hands on the last black and white cookie.

If you’ve ever been to a Yom Kippur break-the-fast or a Shabbat kiddush lunch, you KNOW what I’m talking about. The dessert table is the first table everyone goes for and most certainly, if there is a black and white cookie to be had, it’s the first cookie taken. (Fun fact: Did you know that the black and white cookie isn’t actually a cookie? It’s considered a drop cake. Whatever it is, it’s delicious.) Though folklore tells us that it was quite possibly not invented in NYC, but actually upstate in Ithaca, it’s still been wholly embraced by deli culture.

For me, the black and white cookie represents one of the greatest parts about being Jewish—that Jewish food can be loved and accepted by all, regardless of Jewish affiliation and/or observance level. And while there’s nothing especially “Jewish” about the black and white cookie, one can’t help but think of Jewish culture when eating it (just like brisket or kugel, in my opinion). And so, in this age of increased aggression and polarization toward the other, shouldn’t we all take Jerry Seinfeld’s lead and “look to the cook” … or in this case, the popsicle?! This recipe takes inspiration from a black and white cookie and transforms it with a fun summery twist to create a delicious creamsicle.

Black + White Creamsicle
makes roughly 12 popsicles

Ingredients for the chocolate layer:

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened natural or Dutch process cocoa powder
  • 1/2 shot of espresso
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract (optional)

 

Directions for chocolate layer:

1. Combine the sugar, espresso, cocoa, cornstarch and salt in a heavy medium saucepan. Whisk in just enough of the milk to make a smooth paste. Whisk in the remaining whipping cream.

2. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium heat, stirring with the whisk—constantly scraping the bottom, sides and corners of the pot—until the mixture begins to bubble a little at the edges. Continue whisking and cooking for two more minutes.

3. Off heat, whisk in the vanilla and scrape the mixture into a glass or silicone pitcher (for immediate filling) or into the bowl to cool. Next, fill your popsicle molds halfway with your chocolate mixture and freeze for at least six hours.

Next, make your vanilla side.

Ingredients for vanilla layer:

  • 1/4 cup superfine sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

 

Directions for vanilla layer:

1. In a bowl, stir together the sugar and water until the sugar dissolves. Whisk in the sour cream, milk, cream and vanilla.

2. Take your chocolate popsicles out of the freezer and fill the remaining half with your vanilla side. If your mold has a cover with openings for sticks, cover and insert sticks. Otherwise, freeze until the mixture is thick enough to hold a stick upright and then insert sticks. Freeze until hard, about 4 hours if the mixture was cool, 6 or more hours if hot.

3. Line a tray with wax paper. Fill a container with warm water deep enough to dip the full height of your molds. Dip the mold long enough to release the popsicles when you pull on the stick. Remove and set popsicles on wax paper. Wrap each in a piece of wax paper and/or put them in a resealable plastic freezer bag and return them to the freezer until serving.

Click here for a fun non-dairy popsicle recipe from Whitney!

Vegan Funfetti Cheesecake Bites

  

I grew up with Easter baskets, but I didn’t grow up “celebrating” Easter by any means. When I visited dad’s house during Easter time, though, my stepmother would have beautiful Easter baskets prepared for my brother, myself and of course, my half-sister. If you follow me on my blog, Jewhungry, then you know I am the product of a Jewish mother and a Christian father. My parents divorced when I was 4 and I was primarily raised by my Jewish mother and I am an observant Jewish woman today. That said, I have so much respect and gratitude for the experiences from the exposure to Christianity that I had growing up. At the time, I would’ve said I had respect for it because of the awesome Easter baskets and Christmas presents. Now, as a grown woman and mother, I have respect for it because it’s part of my heritage and what brought me to where I am today.

While I toyed with the idea of figuring out how to do a Passover basket, I realized it just wouldn’t be the same. Also, I’m not a huge fan of cultural religious appropriation. However, if I were to put anything in a Passover basket, these cute little funfetti bites would be it. Not all nuts are kosher for Passover, but hazelnuts and cashews are definitely kosher. Plus, they pair beautifully with the dates. And what doesn’t look good with rainbow sprinkles? You also don’t actually bake these guys so, win-win!

I was inspired by the vegan goddess that is Dana over at The Minimalist Baker. If you don’t know her stuff, well, I’m just gonna assume you’ve been in a coma for years because that’s the only conceivable reason I could understand for not knowing her.

I hope this dessert brings you and your loved ones sweet holidays. Happy no baking!

 Vegan Funfetti Cheesecake Bites {No-Bake + GF}

Ingredients:

Crust:

  • 1 cup packed dates, pitted (if dry, soak in warm water for 10 minutes then drain)
  • 1/2 cup hazelnuts
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract
  • Pinch sea salt

 

Filling:

  • 1 1/2 cups raw cashews, quick soaked*
  • 1 large lemon, juiced
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp. full fat coconut milk (see instructions for note)
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1/2 Tbsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (or more) rainbow sprinkles

 

Instructions:

1. Add ingredients for the crust into a food processor and process until a loose dough forms – it should stick together when you squeeze a bit between your fingers. If it’s too dry, add a few more dates through the spout while processing. If too wet, add a few more hazelnuts or almonds.

2. Grease a standard mini muffin tin.

3. Scoop in heaping 1 Tbsp. amounts of crust and press with fingers, making sure to really pack it in there. Set in freezer to firm up.

4. To quick soak cashews, pour boiling hot water over the cashews, soak for 1 hour uncovered, then drain and use as instructed.

5. Add all filling ingredients to a high-speed blender and mix until very smooth. For the coconut milk, I like to scoop the “cream” off the top because it provides a richer texture. But if yours is already all mixed together, just add it in as is. (Pro tip – Put a can of coconut milk right into the fridge as soon as you get home from the grocery store. This will guarantee you have the ‘cream’ on hand for just such an occasion as making raw cheesecake bites!)

6. Blend all filling ingredients for roughly 1 minute or until silky smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.

7. Pour filling into a separate medium size bowl. Add in your sprinkles leaving a handful to the side for sprinkling on top just before freezing.

8. Divide filling evenly among the muffin tins. Tap a few times to release any air bubbles.

9. Evenly disperse the last sprinkles
onto the tops of each cheesecake to create a pretty little topping. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze until hard – about 4-6 hours.

10. Once set, remove by running a butter knife along the sides of the crust. They should pop right out. Let sit for a few minutes so you don’t break your teeth on them. Keep in the freezer for up to 1-2 weeks.

This recipe was reprinted with permission from jewhungrytheblog.com

Double Chocolate Mint Hamentaschen

  

Hamentaschen recipe

Purim is one of the most accessible Jewish holidays to celebrate. Like Halloween, a big part of it is dressing up and being silly. (All-night reading of The Scroll of Esther and lots of drinking are the other parts.) Unlike Halloween, there’s a beautiful part of Purim that involves the giving of gifts to friends and tzedakah (charity) to the poor. If you’re just dipping your toes in the holiday for the first time, a great way to celebrate is with delicious food. Hamentaschen, symbolizing Haman’s hat, from the story of Purim (which has an interfaith story line), are cookies traditionally made with jam or poppy seed filling, but who doesn’t love chocolate?

I was inspired to do a hamantaschen based on my favorite Girl Scout cookie, the Thin Mint. It focuses on that sweet, decadent chocolate and the mint is brought in via a subtle peppermint glaze. And, if peppermint isn’t your thing, just leave it out and you have yourself a delicious chocolate hamantaschen that will please all your friends and family and maybe just introduce the holiday of Purim to a newcomer.

unbaked hamentaschen

Ingredients:

Makes 2 dozen (give or take a couple)

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup oil
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 3 tsp. baking powder
  • 6 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon strong coffee
  • 1/4 – 1/2 cup large chocolate chips (semi sweet or milk will work. I used milk chocolate)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/4 tsp peppermint oil
  • 3 tablespoons milk

Instructions:

1. Preheat Oven: 350°F

2. In a medium mixing bowl, mix together eggs, oil, sugar and vanilla.

3. Next, add baking powder and flour to the bowl and mix well to combine. Finally, add the cocoa and strong coffee and give it one more good stir (dough should be thick, almost like bread dough).

4. Knead the dough until smooth.

5. Flour a rolling pin and roll out to roughly 1/8 inch thin on a floured board.

6. Using a round cookie cutter or a drinking glass with a wide opening, cut out circles (use the scraps to make cookies as well, just keep forming into a large ball and rolling out thin and repeat process until dough is done).

7. Drop a handful of chocolate chips (should be roughly 10 chips or more) into the center of each circle.

8. Have a glass or small bowl of a little bit of cold water near by so that you can dip your fingers in to help fold the dough into three sides over the filling forming a triangle (water acts as a glue to the dough and will help edges stick).

9. Bake at 350°F for 15 minutes on a lined cookie sheet.

10. Once fully cooked, let cool for at least 5 – 10 minutes. While cooling, place the powdered sugar, peppermint oil and milk into a small bowl and stir until milky consistency.

11. Once the cookies are cool, brush the sugar/oil mixture over the tops.

Hamentaschen ready to bake

Glaze the hamentaschen

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Tahini Vanilla Ice Box Cake

  

Tahini ice box cake

Valentine’s Day. How does this fit into a Jewish or interfaith home? Technically, yes, Valentine’s Day is named for a saint. It was first instituted by Pope Gelasius I in 496 C.E. to commemorate the martyrdom of St. Valentine. Yet scholars know almost nothing about this St. Valentine. There is an abundant amount of  literature on St. Valentine but most of it is not historical but based on legend. And, truth be told, Valentine’s Day is not a “religious” holiday. The association of a saint does not necessary make it so. I’m sure some might take issues with the previous sentences but to my estimation, Valentine’s Day is an American “holiday” and perfect for families that celebrate Jewish and non-Jewish holidays.

My kids go to private Jewish preschool. They haven’t come in contact yet with Valentine’s Day. But, our oldest will be headed to public Kindergarten next year and we can almost guarantee that we will be met with Valentines. And I ask you? What’s not “Jewish” about showing your like and care with the giving of sweet cards and yummy treats? But, if you’re like me and you’re still struggling with the concept of bringing Valentine’s Day into your home, then why not make it a little more Jewish with the inclusion of seemingly “Jewish” foods like, I don’t know, tahini!

Therefore, I bring you a simple and delicious tahini and vanilla ice box cake. I love ice box cakes. They’re great for impressing your family and friends while not having to actually cook anything. I mean, what says, “I love you” more than frozen tahini in the shape of hearts set in a pink ice cream cake!?

Tahini Vanilla Icebox Cake

Ingredients for Halva:

  • 2 cups honey
  • 1 1/2 cups tahini, well stirred to combine

 

Ingredients for Icebox Cake:

  • 2 pints vanilla ice cream
  • 2 teaspoons of natural red gel food coloring or 4 1/2 teaspoons red liquid food coloring (optional)
  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • (optional) 1 cup rainbow sprinkles

 

Directions for Halva Hearts:

Halva hearts1. Heat honey on medium heat until your candy or instant-read thermometer reads 240˚ F, or indicates the “soft ball” stage of candy making. To confirm that you are at the “soft ball” stage, drop a bit of the honey into a cup of cold water. It should form a sticky and soft ball that flattens when removed from the water.

2. Have the tahini ready to heat in a separate small pot, and once the honey is at the appropriate temperature, set the honey aside and heat tahini to 120Ëš F.

3. Add the warmed tahini to the honey and mix with a wooden spoon to combine. At first it will look separated but after a few minutes, the mixture will come together smoothly.

4. Continue to mix until the mixture starts to stiffen, for a good 6-8 minutes. Pour mixture into a well-greased and parchment paper-lined 8 x 8 deep-set baking sheet or loaf pan (it MUST have at least 1 inch sides on the pan you use as it’ll keep the tahini within the pan), or into a greased and parchment paper-lined cake pan with a removable bottom.

5. Let cool to room temperature and wrap tightly with plastic wrap. Leave in the refrigerator for up to 36 hours. This will allow the sugar crystals to form, which will give the halvah its distinctive texture.

6. Once done, cut out at least 8 – 10 hearts using a sharp, metal cookie cutter.

Directions for Vanilla Ice Box Cake:

pink ice cream

stir ice creamice cream

 

 

Ice cream over heartsAdd hearts to ice cream1. In a chilled bowl combine vanilla ice cream and food coloring. Cover and freeze for 1 hour or until mixture is spreadable.

2. Line a 9-inch Pullman or a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with two sheets of plastic wrap, enough to cover the bottom and sides, allowing plastic wrap to extend over sides of pan. Spread half of the vanilla ice cream evenly in the bottom of the pan.

3. Place the tahini stars down the center of the ice cream pressing down so that the bottom points of the stars are completely submerged in the pink ice cream and the tops are just visible, and placing stars so that they are touching. Freeze for 1 hour.

4. Spread the rest of the pink vanilla ice cream in an even layer over the stars to cover. Cover the top of the cake with heaps of rainbow sprinkles. Freeze for 24 hours or until very firm.

5. Use the plastic wrap to lift mixture from pan. Transfer to a serving plate and cut about an inch into the cake to reveal the first heart. Enjoy!

finished ice cream cake

Strawberry Dessert Nachos

  

Strawberry Dessert Nachos Valentine’s day is fast approaching, but we believe in celebrating big love, little love, silly love, happy love, sad love and family love any day of the week. In our diverse Jewish, multi-faith community, it’s important to show our love for one another, and take advantage of opportunities to spread kindness. This quick and easy chocolate and strawberry nacho recipe is perfect for whenever love strikes.

“Not Your Average Love” Nachos

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of frozen strawberries
  • zest from 1/4 lime
  • 4 Tbsp. of sugar, divided
  • 3-4 handfuls of Churro style nacho chips (cinnamon sugar corn chips) or Cinnamon Sugar Pita chips
  • 1/2 cup of heavy cream
  • 1 Tbsp. of unsalted butter
  • 1 3.5 oz tablet of dark chocolate

 

Directions:

1. Over medium low heat, heat two cups of frozen strawberries in a small saucepan. Add the zest from 1/4 of the lime and 2 Tbsp. of sugar to the saucepan and cook with the lid off. Once the strawberries have started to release their juices and are completely thawed and soft, take the pan off the heat and let it cool slightly.

2. Once cooled, put the strawberry mixture into a blender and blend until smooth. Be careful when blending because if the mixture is still warm the steam may create pressure and pop the lid off the blender.

3. Pour the strawberry mixture into a cute bowl and then prepare the chocolate drizzle. In a small saucepan, add 1/2 cup of cream and 1 Tbsp. of butter and heat over medium low until the butter has completely melted. Add 2 Tbsp. of sugar to the cream and butter mixture. Once the sugar has dissolved, take the pot off the heat.

4. Break the chocolate into squares and let them dissolve in the hot cream.

5. Spread the cinnamon sugar chips over a platter or plate and drizzle with the chocolate sauce. Put the extra chocolate sauce in another cute bowl to serve on the side.

6. Dip a chocolate drizzled chip into the strawberry salsa and feed it to someone you love.

Gingerbread Sufganiyot (Hanukkah Doughnuts)

  

 

sufganiyot_stackChristmas and the first night of Hanukkah fall on the same day this year. Growing up the child of a divorced, interreligious family, this would have blown my mind even more than it does as an adult. While I was raised primarily in my Jewish mother’s home, my brother and I spent every Christmas with my dad, stepmother and half-sister, and we loved it. I mean, loved it. Sure, the extra presents were nice (very nice), but the experience of both holidays was nothing short of warmth.

Now, at 36, as I think back to having to shuffle between houses for holidays, I feel nothing but warmth. I loved lighting the menorah and the smell of the match as it lit a fresh batch of Hanukkah candles. I equally loved the smell of eggnog and the sound of Nat King Cole’s classic Christmas record as I helped my dad and family decorate the tree. I never once felt I was compromising my enriched and grounded Jewish identity as I played along with my dad and stepmom in pretending, for the sake of my beloved half-sister, that Santa and his reindeer were, in fact, on the roof trying to figure out how to get down the chimney.

Somehow, my family figured out how to give my brother and me a safe and inviting interreligious experience growing up and never asked us to choose. It was our normal, and it was perfect. I hope this recipe helps you bring some of that warmth into your home.

Gingerbread Sufganiyot

Ingredients

For the doughnuts:

  • 1 and 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar, plus ½ cup extra for coating
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. active dry yeast
  • 2 eggs
  • ÂĽ cup plus 2 tsp. warm water
  • 4.5 Tbsp. room-temperature butter
  • 4 cups neutral oil for frying (like canola)

 

For the filling:

  • ½ cup cream
  • ÂĽ cup milk
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 2 Tbsp. cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp. ginger
  • 1 Tbsp. allspice
  • ÂĽ Tbsp. nutmeg
  • ÂĽ Tbsp. ground cloves
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 Tbsp. sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. cornstarch

 

Instructions

1.  Place all doughnut ingredients, except the butter, into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Work on a low speed for about 4 minutes, or until well-combined and elastic.

2.  With the mixer still running, add the butter piece by piece, until it’s all worked in and incorporated. There should be no visible pieces. This will take about 5-8 minutes.

3.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm place to rise until doubled in size.

4.  While the dough is rising, make the filling. Place the cream, milk, vanilla and gingerbread-spice mixture into a small saucepan over medium heat.

5.  In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, sugar and cornstarch. When the milk begins to bubble around the edges, remove it from the heat and slowly whisk it into the egg mixture.

6.  Pour the mixture back into the pan over medium heat, whisking constantly. Cook until it boils and becomes very thick, about 1-2 minutes. Once the mixture is the consistency of soft butter, scrape it out into a bowl, cover and set aside to cool completely.

doughnut dough

7.  When the dough has risen, punch it down and scrape it out onto a well-floured surface. Make sure your hands are properly floured and pat the dough into a rectangle, about ½-inch thick, and cut out nine doughnuts using a well-floured 2.5-inch round biscuit cutter or large glass. Place the doughnuts on a lined baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap and set aside to rise for 45 minutes, or until puffy.

8.  When the doughnuts are finished their second rise, place about 2 inches of oil into a high-sided pan (or use a deep fryer) and heat over a low flame, until it reaches 350 degrees (or until a small piece of dough dropped in the oil bubbles and rises to the surface).

9.  Fry the doughnuts a few at a time (don’t crowd the pan) for about 1 minute each side, or until golden brown and cooked through.

10.  Drain on paper towels and toss in the ½ cup sugar.

Inject doughnuts with gingerbread

11.  To fill the doughnuts, I use a flavor injector, like you would use for a turkey. I find this the easiest way to get the cream in. Alternatively, you can place the mixture into a piping bag fitted with a ¼-inch nozzle. Press the piping bag into the side of each doughnut and squeeze until you can feel the weight of the doughnut increase slightly.

Find more Hanukkah recipes here

Gingerbread dougnuts

Ponchiki: Polish Cheese Doughnut Holes

  

PonchikiThere are two stories associated with Hanukkah: One tells how the vial of oil that was supposed to last for one day lasted for eight, and the other is the story of Judith and how she saved her town from annihilation at the hands of General Holefernes by getting him drunk on salty cheese and wine until he passed out and was killed. The latter story is not often told in Hebrew school (for good reason!), but the holiday’s culinary tradition of eating foods prepared with cheese is widespread throughout Mediterranean Jewish communities.

Doughnuts, or sufganiot as they are called in Israel, are a Sephardi treat. Ponchiki, however, are traditionally made in Poland and Eastern Europe, the area where Ashkenazi Jews came from. So this recipe not only combines two culinary traditions and two cultural areas of Judaism, it also fulfills the holiday traditions of consuming fried foods and cheese.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup all-purpose or gluten-free flour
  • ½ Tbsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 large egg
  • ÂĽ cup sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 7.5-ounce packages Friendship Dairies Farmer Cheese or 2 cups homemade farmer’s cheese (see recipe below)
  • 3-4 cups corn or vegetable oil for frying

 

Directions:

1.  Combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a one-quart bowl. Set aside.

2.  Whisk the egg in a two-quart bowl. Add the sugar and vanilla, continuing to whisk until foamy and well combined.

ponchiki: whisk

add the cheese3.  Add the cheese and whisk vigorously to break it down into small particles, thoroughly combining it with the egg mixture.

4.  Add the flour mixture and stir with the whisk or a spatula until no particles of flour are visible.

5.  Heat the oil in a small, deep fryer or in a two-quart saucepan to a temperature of 375ºF. If necessary, add enough oil to come to a depth of about two inches. If you don’t have a deep-fry thermometer, you’ll know the oil is ready when a little bit of dough rolls in the oil and begins to brown.

 

 

Fry your doughnuts6. Using a small spring ice-cream scoop or a tablespoon and rubber spatula, scoop up some dough and drop it into the hot oil. Don’t fry more than six balls at a time so the oil temperature remains constant. Turn doughnut holes over, if necessary, to brown on all sides. Doughnuts will be done after about three minutes. If holes are browning too fast, lower the heat slightly.

7.  Crumple paper towels on a plate to drain the holes of excess oil. While still warm, toss them in confectioner’s sugar or in a mixture of cinnamon and sugar.

They are best eaten warm but will stay crisp for a few hours.

 

Homemade Farmer’s Cheese

Makes about two to three cups.

Ingredients:

  • ½ gallon whole or 2 percent milk
  • 1 quart buttermilk
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • Cheesecloth

 

Directions:

1.  Bring milk and buttermilk to a simmer. Add the salt and continue to cook until the ingredients separate into curds and whey.

2.  Scoop up the cheese with a skimmer or small strainer and place in a large double-mesh strainer or colander lined with three layers of cheesecloth. Let the cheese sit so any excess moisture can drip out, then bring the edges of the cloth together and twist them to force out any leftover moisture.

3.  Refrigerate the cheese until ready to use in a recipe, or eat with jam on toast.

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