Dulce de Manzana

  

dulce_apple_peeling_650_croppedWhen the Jewish New Year arrives, people often wish their family and friends a “sweet and fruitful New Year.” Because the holiday occurs right at the beginning of apple season, apples are the fruit of choice. People with ancestry from Eastern Europe and Russia ceremoniously dip apple wedges in honey to symbolize this good wish. Sephardic Jews, or Jews who can trace their ancestry back to Spain (“Sepharad” means “Spain” in Hebrew), and especially Turkish Jews, have another custom: dulce de manzana.

dulce_ingredients_650Dulce de manzana means “sweet of the apple,” and this delicious rose-scented apple preserve is spread on pieces of challah at the beginning of the Rosh Hashanah meal. It is so delicious that any leftovers stored in the refrigerator can be used for weeks as a spread on toast and sandwiches, or even as a base for small custard tarts. If you have an apple peeler (as shown in the photo) your children can help peel the apples while developing their gross motor skills. I also like to use the coarse blade on my food processor. The grating is fast and the apples don’t have time to discolor (although the little bit of lemon juice will rectify that). My last suggestion is to use firm apples as suggested in the recipe. That way the apple strands keep their shape and you won’t end up with applesauce!

DULCE de MANZANA

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 2 pounds apples (Granny Smith, Gala or Red Delicious)
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • 1 Tbsp. rosewater or 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ¼ cup slivered almonds

 

Directions:

1. Place the sugar and water in a 3 quart saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat.

2. While the mixture is heating, peel the apples and grate them by hand with a coarse grater or use a coarse grating disc on your processor. Immediately add the apples to the hot sugar syrup.

3. Reduce the temperature to medium and allow to cook for 30 -45 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated and the mixture is quite thick. (Note: the amount of time depends on the variety of apple and its juice content.) Stir the mixture occasionally to prevent sticking.

dulce_apples_in_pot_650

4. While mixture is cooking, toast the almonds in a 350F oven for 4 minutes or until lightly golden. Set aside.

5. When mixture is thickened (it will get thicker when it cools) add the rosewater or the vanilla and place in an open container until cool. The toasted almonds may be added to the mixture or sprinkled on top as a garnish. Refrigerate until serving.

dulce_on_stove_650

 

Roasted Cauliflower and Sweet Potato with Figs and Tahini

  

title fig 650_horizontalI absolutely love Rosh Hashanah and all things High Holiday season. I love fall weather, and I love the changing leaves and a bit of crisp in the air (though having lived in Miami and then Los Angeles for the last five years, I do miss the actual crisp in the air). Rosh Hashanah has been my favorite holiday ever since I was a little kid growing up in Atlanta. But it wasn’t until I learned how to really cook that Rosh Hashanah cemented itself in my heart as a culinary holiday. As I learn more and more about the holidays, I gain a better understanding of just how connected Jewish holidays are to the earth, the season and the harvest for that season. The recipe in this post is a testament to my commitment to honor the fruits and vegetables of the season. Roasted cauliflower and sweet potato is one of my go-to recipes for a quick, healthy and flavorful side dish on any Shabbat dinner table. But I wanted to jazz things up a bit, so I added some roasted garlic and perfectly ripe figs to balance the saltiness of the tahini. Whether you’re hosting a bunch of family this holiday season or feasting alone, do yourself a favor and try this dish. It’s great as a hot side or as a topping on a salad the next day. Enjoy!

Roasted Cauliflower and Sweet Potato with Figs and Tahini

Ingredients:

  • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1½-inch pieces
  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • 5 cloves garlic, skins removed
  • 4 Tbsp. plus ½ Tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tsp. kosher salt
  • ½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. ground turmeric
  • ½ cup tahini paste
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 3-4 Tbsp. hot water
  • 5-6 figs, cut in half length-wise
  • Fresh cilantro or flat-leaf parsley, optional

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.fig_roasted

2. Spread the cauliflower florets and sweet potato in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and turmeric. Using a spatula, mix the cauliflower and sweet potato to spread the oil and spices around.

3. Place garlic cloves and remaining olive oil on a small piece of aluminum foil. Wrap garlic and oil in the foil so no oil can escape. Place foil in the corner of the baking sheet holding the veggies.

4. Place baking sheet in the oven and bake roughly 40 minutes, or until cauliflower and sweet potato are crispy on the edges.

5. Meanwhile, prepare the tahini by adding the tahini paste, lemon, kosher salt and garlic
powder to a deep bowl. Mix until combined. Add the water a tablespoon at a time, stirring in between until the desired consistency is met. Taste as you go and adjust the seasoning to your liking. I like mine pretty runny, so I may add another tablespoon or more of hot water.

6. Once vegetables are done, let cool for 5 minutes (make sure to open the foil of garlic and let it cool as well). Place all veggies and sliced figs on a serving dish and drizzle with tahini. Serve with an additional topping of cilantro or parsley, if desired.

 

fig 7 edited 650

Rosh Hashanah Cinnamon Roll Challah with an Italian Twist

  

Challah for the Jewish New Year is special—round to celebrate the circle of life and sweet (typically with raisins) in the hope of a sweet year. For the occasion, I make what I call my cinnamon roll challah, with rum-soaked raisins (an homage to Italian desserts featuring rum) and a pretty swirl of brown sugar and cinnamon inside.

cinnamon raisin challah whole

Rosh Hashanah Cinnamon Roll Challah with an Italian Twist

Recipe reprinted with permission from Meatballs and Matzah Balls: Recipes and Reflections from a Jewish and Italian Life

Yield: Two large loaves. (Dairy with butter or Pareve with margarine or oil.)

Ingredients:

Dough

  • Cooking spray or extra-virgin olive oil for coating the bowl and plastic wrap
  • ½ cup rum
  • ½ cup (generous) dark raisins
  • 1 envelope active dry yeast (about 2¼ tsp.)
  • 1 cup very warm water (105 to 110 degrees)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 4 eggs (with one yolk reserved for topping), room temperature
  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter (or margarine or oil), softened
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 5½ to 6½ cups bread flour, plus additional for work surface
  • 1½ tsp. salt

 

Filling

  • ½ cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1¼ tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter or margarine, melted
  • ¼ tsp. vanilla extract

 

Egg Wash

  • Reserved egg yolk from dough recipe
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon cold water

 

Directions:

1. Coat a large bowl with cooking spray or olive oil and set aside.

2. Heat rum in the microwave or on stovetop until hot. Pour over raisins to submerge them completely. Let stand about 10 minutes. Drain and discard the rum and pat the raisins dry. Set aside.

3. Dissolve the yeast and the warm water in a large bowl, about five minutes. Mix in the sugar, three whole eggs and the one egg white, butter and vanilla. Stir in 2½ cups of the flour and the salt, and combine well. Then add 2½ more cups of flour and mix well. Add additional flour as needed to form a cohesive dough.

4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead for about 10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Press the dough into a large thick disk, and insert a handful of the raisins, spaced apart. Fold the dough over the raisins and flatten again; continue inserting raisins this way until all are incorporated and well distributed.

5. Place the dough in the oiled bowl, then lift out, turn over, and place it (oiled side up) back in the bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and set in a warm place to rise until doubled, about 1½ to 2 hours.

6. Uncover the dough and press down on the middle to deflate. Cover and let rest for a few minutes.

7. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Prepare the filling by stirring together the brown sugar and cinnamon. In a separate bowl, combine the vanilla extract and the melted butter or margarine.

8. Divide the dough in half. Return one half to the bowl and cover. Place the other half on a lightly floured surface. Roll out to a large rectangle, about 20 inches long by 9 to 10 inches wide. Brush a thin layer of the butter over the dough. Then sprinkle with half the brown sugar mixture.

9. Starting at one long edge of the dough, roll it (jelly-roll style) gently but firmly to the other edge. Press the seam and ends to seal. Gently pull and roll this log until it is about 24 inches long, keeping the original thickness on one end and gradually narrowing the other end. Twine the narrow end around the larger end to make a large pinwheel. Press the loose end to seal. Gently press down on the top of the entire loaf to level it.

10. Transfer to prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining dough. Prepare the egg wash by lightly beating the reserved egg yolk, a pinch of salt, and 1 teaspoon cold water to combine. Brush on shaped loaves. Gently cover the loaves with oiled plastic wrap and let rise about 45 minutes, until nearly doubled. Halfway through the rise, preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

11. Bake for 20 minutes, and then reduce heat to 350 degrees. Bake another 15 to 18 minutes, until loaf sounds hollow when tapped (the interior should be between 185 and 190 degrees). Some of the sugar mixture might seep out and create a sweet undercrust, which I consider ideal. Serve the same day or freeze.

cinnamon raisin challah sliced

 

marcia_friedman_smallMarcia Friedman is the author of Meatballs and Matzah Balls: Recipes and Reflections from a Jewish and Italian Life. She continues to write about her journey and the intersection of Jewish and Italian food at meatballsandmatzahballs.com.

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples and Onions

  

Roasted_Vegetables-FPO_650

Apples, the symbolic fruit for the Jewish New Year, can find their way onto your holiday menu in many ways. This recipe may not have its origins in Europe or the Middle East, but it plays on the tradition of elevating even the simplest of ingredients into a festive dish.

I serve this as a side for brisket or chicken, but you can also combine it with quinoa or barley as a more substantial side dish or vegetarian main course. Although you can buy a whole butternut squash and peel and cube it yourself, I find it’s worth the time and money to buy the squash already peeled and cubed. You might have to cut some of the chunks into smaller pieces if they’re too large, but otherwise this is a fast and easy dish to make. You don’t even have to peel the apples!IMG_2987_650

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples and Onions

Serves 6-8 as a side dish

Ingredients:

  • 1 large onion
  • 2 apples (Fuji, Honeycrisp or Jonagold)
  • 20 oz. cubed butternut squash (about 4-5 cups of 1-inch cubes)
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. minced fresh thyme or 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1 Tbsp. balsamic or pomegranate vinegar
  • Kosher salt
  • 20 grindings of black pepper or to taste
  • ½ cup dried cranberries or cherries
  • ¼ cup sunflower seeds or toasted pine nuts (optional)

 

Directions:sliced_onions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Cut onion in half and slice each piece crosswise into ½-inch strips. Place on a large rimmed baking sheet and set aside.

3. Using an apple slicer, cut apple into eighths and then cut each wedge into three or four chunks. Add to the onions, along with the squash cubes.

diced_apples_butternut_squash

4. Add the remaining ingredients and toss well. Arrange in a single layer and bake for 20 minutes. If onions are not yet golden and squash is still firm, gently turn the mixture and return to the oven for another 6 minutes, or until done.

toss_apples_squash

5. Remove from the oven. Sprinkle with dried cranberries and sunflower seeds and serve.

sprinkle_apples_squash_serve

Dairy Matzah Kugel for Passover

  

Matzah Kugel served with gefilte fish and side salad

Some people have strong feelings about the kind of recipe that aims to create a Passover-friendly version of a dish that is typically leavened. Detractors think creating Passover bagels, muffins, and rolls miss the point of the holiday’s specific diet. Those in favor see the practice as helping to make a difficult holiday more bearable. Some will even point to foods like Passover Popovers as an example of Jewish ingenuity.

Personally, I fall somewhere in the middle. I don’t see the point suffering through a week of “I can’t believe you want to call this a bagel.” (But hey, if you can convince yourself that whatever you’ve come up with tastes like a bagel, more power to you. I’ll have eggs for breakfast this week.) On the other hand, when the introduction of matzah into a dish creates a delightful new twist on an old favorite, I’m all for it.

This brings us to Matzah Kugel, a sweet, dairy-filled confection of matzah layered with sweetened cheese. Sure, you could make a kugel with Passover noodles and come up with an almost-but-not-quite-satisfying proxy for the regular version, but you will never forget that it’s not the “real” thing. Matzah kugel, on the other hand, takes the idea of a noodle kugel as a jumping off point and transforms it into something different but equally delicious.

This dish can function as a side dish or a main course. (It pairs well with a side salad and a piece of gefilte fish.) You can freeze leftover portions: they reheat well in the microwave and even make a delicious and quick breakfast when you just can’t take one more piece of matzah with cream cheese.

Cheese Matzah Kugel for Passover

(Serves 9)

Kugel ingredientsIngredients:

  • 6 sheets matzah, broken into large pieces
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 pound cottage cheese
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons melted butter, plus additional butter to grease the pan

 

Directions:

Matzah layered in the baking dish1.  Preheat oven to 350°F. In a mixing bowl, beat together the eggs and milk.

2.  Add cottage cheese, salt, sugar, cinnamon, and butter and mix to combine thoroughly.

3.  Grease an 8 inch square baking dish with butter.

4.  Arrange half of the matzah so that it covers the bottom of the dish.

5.  Pour half of the cheese mixture over it. Repeat with balance of the matzah and cheese mixture. If you wish, sprinkle additional cinnamon and sugar over the top of the kugel.

6.  Bake at 350°F for 40 minutes or until set.

The matzah kugel when it's done baking

The Knish of Plenty: A Thanksgiving (Leftovers) Knish

  

Thanksgiving feast in a knish.

Thanksgiving is a North American tradition that falls just at the end of the great harvest before the soil freezes and goes dormant for the winter. It is a meal that tells tales of the Native Americans who owned the soil and the Puritan immigrants who were looking for new soil from which to harvest meals and on which to live more freely. While each family has their own must haves on the table and Thanksgiving traditions (Football or Charlie Brown on TV), one thing that holds true for just about every family is that there will be leftovers.

If you look for some history on the knish, most routes point to Brooklyn, NY, but their heritage goes all the back to “the old country” in Poland. Traditionally a knish is filled with potatoes mashed with onions and schmaltz (rendered chicken fat). There are also kasha knishes (buckwheat), and the sweet cheese knish. My knish takes your Thanksgiving leftovers and puts them in a wonderful little package that can be enjoyed right away or frozen to nosh (snack) on later when you’re craving a little taste of Thanksgiving.

Note: This recipe uses a dairy free stuffing in order to keep the recipe Kosher. The gravy is also dairy free and is thickened with the schmaltz from the turkey gravy: When you separate the fat from the gravy, chill it and use it to make your flour slurry to thicken the gravy. 

Thanksgiving Knishes
(makes 24 full size knishes)

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of leftover stuffing
  • 3 cups of cubed leftover turkey
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tsp. pepper
  • salt for finishing (I like to use Maldon sea salt or a French flaky salt, but Kosher salt is OK too)
  • 1- 1 1/2 cups of chicken stock, vegetable stock or water
  • gravy
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups cranberry sauce
  • roasted onions, shallots, carrots, Brussels sprouts (whatever vegetables you have leftover), to get 1 cup of thinly sliced vegetables
Sage leaves waiting to be fried crisp for the knish dough and the garnish.

Sage leaves waiting to be fried crisp for the knish dough and the garnish.

Sage Warm Water Knish Dough Ingredients

  • 1 large bunch of sage leaves (20-40 leaves of all sizes)
  •  1/4 cup of olive oil
  • 1/4 cup of canola oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup of warm water
  • 1/2 tsp. of salt
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 1/2 cups of all purpose flour
  • 1 egg and 1 Tbsp. water for an egg wash

 

Directions:

1.  Begin by making the fried sage leaves. You will need to make sure your leaves are completely dry before starting. Have a plate with a paper towel on it nearby and a slotted spoon. Heat the 1/4 cup of olive oil and the 1/4 cup of canola oil over medium heat in a small pan with a tight fitting lid. Once the oil is hot (if you splash a drop of water on it, it dances about and sizzles), with the lid in one hand, carefully toss in 1/4 of your sage leaves and immediately place the lid on top of the pot. The leaves will sizzle furiously. Once the sizzling stops, gently give the leaves one last stir and then carefully remove them and place them on the paper towel. Repeat with the rest of the leaves in 3 more batches.

2.  Set the prettiest leaves aside as a garnish. The rest you will break into your dough.

3.  Set the sage oil aside and let it cool.

4.  In a food processor, with the steel knife, process the eggs, the 1/2 cup of cooled sage oil, and warm water for 5 seconds or until mixed.

5.  Add to the egg mixture: salt, baking powder and flour. Process with 2-3 on/off pulses. Then crumble in the sage leaves. Process everything until just blended through.

Knish dough mixture

In just a few seconds this mixture comes together into a beautiful knish dough. It is slightly sticky but easy to work with after it rests

6.  Add a small handful of flour to a bowl just to coat. Put the sticky knish dough into the bowl and let it rest for 10 minutes while you prep your fillings.

The stuffing before the additional broth is added.

You can see here how mashed the stuffing gets.  It becomes more like a soft mashed potato texture than a stuffing texture.

You can see here in the top bowl how mashed the stuffing gets. It becomes more like a soft mashed potato texture than a stuffing texture. The bottom bowl holds the knish dough as it rests.

7.  Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease a baking sheet with canola oil or some sort of oil spray.

8.  Add 1/2 cup of stock and 2 tsp of pepper to your stuffing and mash it all together with a fork so you have a very soft mashed stuffing. If your stuffing is very dry you can add a little more. If you have a very soft stuffing you may need a little less.

9.  Cube your turkey. You can do a mix of dark and light meat.

10.  Add the zest of one lemon to your cranberry sauce.

 

Assembly:

Rolled out knish dough

Knish dough waiting to be filled

 

1.  Now it is time to assemble. Divide your dough into four sections. Each section will be divided into six balls of dough for a total of 24. Working with one section at a time, make six balls of dough. On a floured counter or cutting board, roll out one dough ball at a time as thinly as possible. The dough will almost be see-through. Make sure you have no holes. If you have a hole, ball it up and start again.

Unbaked knishes

Knishes ready for an egg wash and to be popped into the oven

2.  Take your rectangle of dough and add in a tablespoon or so each of turkey and stuffing. Add in a few slices of vegetables and a 1 tablespoon of cranberry sauce. Adjust amount of filling to fit inside the dough. After the first one, you will have a good sense of how much is too much.

3.  Carefully stretch the dough over the top of the stuffing pulling one side at a time over and layering them on top of one another. Then, flip the knish over so the seam is on the bottom and place it on the greased baking sheet. Continue with the rest of the dough. I like to bake 6 at a time, but you can do more if you like.

4.  Blend your egg with 1 tablespoon of water to make an egg wash. Brush the knishes with the egg wash and sprinkle with a little salt. Bake the knishes for 35-40 minutes until golden brown.

To serve, garnish with a fried sage leaf, warm up some gravy and serve with a side of cranberry sauce. Enjoy your gourmet leftovers!

Thanksgiving knish ready to be enjoyed.

TGKnish-9

Sweet Potato Pumpkin Cazuela for Sukkot

  

SweetPotatoCazuelaSukkot is synonymous with fall fruits and vegetables which are often used to decorate the sukkah. No specific foods are required but using the abundance of our local harvest replicates the Israelites bringing some of the bounty of their harvest to the Temple in Jerusalem. Making the long trek to the city, the travelers dwelled in temporary huts, or sukkahs, at the base of the Jerusalem hills.

It is customary to sleep and eat in the sukkah for eight days. In many climates this is not advisable, but eating in the temporary hut that has a lattice roof through which to view the stars was mandated in the Talmud on this holiday. Mandate aside, it is customary to invite friends and family to partake of a meal in your own sukkah (or to visit friends who have built one).

Dishes that are easily transported from your kitchen to the table outside are preferred and, of course, including nature’s fall produce is a must. Here is a side dish that can be made dairy with butter or parve (no milk or meat products) if anyone in your sukkah keeps kosher. It is Caribbean in origin, an area of the world where many Jews settled 400 years ago. You can, of course, bake your own sweet potatoes and small pie pumpkin to mash for this sweet potato pumpkin cazuela, but to save time and even allow your young children to help you make this recipe I call for canned pumpkin and sweet potatoes in light or no syrup.

One word of warning: This dish is so very delicious that I would double or triple the ingredients if you are making it for more than four people. And don’t forget Thanksgiving. But, please, hold the marshmallows—this is not a dessert, but could be served with any number of other dishes.

Sweet Potato Pumpkin Cazuela

Cazuela ingredientsIngredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter or coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. all purpose flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 5.6 ounce can unsweetened coconut milk (about 2/3 cup)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin puree (NOT pie filling)
  • 1 29-ounce can of yams in light syrup, drained and mashed
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/8 tsp. ground ginger
  • 2-inch stick of cinnamon broken into pieces
  • 1/4 tsp. fennel seeds
  • 3 whole cloves

 

Directions:

1.  Place the butter or coconut oil in a 2-quart Pyrex bowl and microwave for 45 seconds.

2.  Whisk the sugars, flour and salt into the butter to combine.

3.  Whisk the coconut milk into the mixture until thoroughly blended. Add the eggs and combine.

4.  Add the pumpkin puree and the mashed yams and whisk until a smooth batter is formed.

Spices and pumpkin puree

Pumpkin cazuela5.  Combine the water with the spices in a small glass cup and microwave for 3 ½ minutes. Let the spices steep for 5 minutes. Strain the spiced water through a fine mesh strainer into the pumpkin-potato mixture and stir to incorporate.

7.  Butter a 2-quart casserole and pour the mixture into the prepared dish.

8.  Bake covered in a pre-heated 350°F oven for 1 hour. Serve hot out of the oven or reheated warm or hot.

Happy Sukkot!

Tidbits:

Sugar pie pumpkins are about 1 ½ pounds and very rounded. Always use them when a recipe calls for cooked pumpkin. Larger pumpkins are more watery.

Coconut milk is not milk or dairy. It is the liquid formed from ground, fresh, hydrated coconut.

Traditional Rosh Hashanah Teiglach

  

TTEIGLACHeiglach is an eastern European confection most closely associated with Rosh Hashanah. It was often served for festive occasions such as a wedding, bar mitzvah or bris and in some communities during Shavuot or Simchat Torah because Torah is often equated with honey.

Teig in Yiddish means dough and Lach at the end of a word signifies small. Therefore Teiglach are little balls of baked dough submerged in honey syrup and then mixed with dried or candied cherries or raisins and some nuts (usually almond or hazelnut).

Once readily available in bakeries in large Jewish communities throughout North America, this confection is rapidly disappearing, so whether you were raised Jewish or not, this treat may be new to you. Not to worry if your own family doesn’t have the recipe; Teiglach is easy to make!

Even small children can help make the dough because no electric equipment is required and children enjoy rolling the dough into “snakes” while you can rapidly complete the task. However, children MUST NOT be involved with making the honey syrup, as the high temperature will certainly burn them if they accidentally touch the syrup before it cools. They can watch from afar and measure the awaiting dried fruit and nuts, but an adult must work alone while making the syrup and mixing all of the ingredients together.

The Teiglach may be served in a large pyramid or a few coated balls spooned into little paper cups. It is meant to be eaten with the fingers, pulling the balls off one by one and definitely licking one’s fingers afterwards!

L’Shanah Tova!

Teiglach

Ingredients:Teiglach Ingredients

  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 Tablespoons water
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1/4-teaspoon ginger
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 pound wildflower honey (any honey is O.K. but wildflower is the best)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon ginger
  • 1 piece of orange zest 2″ long 1/2 inch wide
  • 1 cup toasted hazelnuts
  • 1/2 cup candied cherries or raisins

 


Directions:

1.  Preheat the oven to 375°F.

2.  In a small bowl, combine the eggs, oil, water and vanilla and beat with a fork or whisk until light and combined. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, salt, ginger and baking powder.

3.  Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir with a fork until well combined.

Teiglach adding egg mixture

knead the dough4.  Knead with your hands for a few minutes until dough is smooth and shiny. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

5.  Roll out small balls of dough into long 1/2-inch wide snakes and cut into 1/3 inch pieces. Roll dough pieces briefly in your hands to make balls and place them on ungreased cookie sheets. Bake for 20 – 22 minutes or until golden brown. Cool completely or freeze until later use.

6.  When you are ready to complete recipe, combine the honey, sugar, orange zest and ginger in a heavy 3-quart saucepan and bring slowly to a boil. Simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add the teiglach balls, nuts and cherries or raisins to the honey mixture and stir to coat well. Place in a pie plate or individual tart tins mounded to form a pyramid.

 

 

 

Teiglach Syrup boiling

Teiglach Syrup cooking

 

IMG_0509IMG_0508Teiglach finished

Passover & Easter Coexist in Southern Dry-Rub Brisket

  

table settingBrisketThere can certainly be challenges when melding two faith traditions, and at no time of year does that seem more evident than when Passover and Easter overlap. This is no coincidence, as the Last Supper is thought to possibly have been a seder meal, and the holidays share a great deal of symbolism and significance. But what are you to do when preparing a meal for your relatives on Easter that also needs to be kosher for Passover? What if you’re attending an Easter meal but your family is keeping Passover? Here’s the perfect recipe to share with your host so they can plan a meal that’s sensitive to Passover without giving up any of the delicacy of a big Easter meal.

Passover is the most widely celebrated Jewish holiday, so while many Jews are non-observant during the rest of the year, Passover is a time when it can feel good to participate in a holiday outside the synagogue that has clear rituals around food. Not everyone follows these restrictions in the same way, and it’s a time when you have the ability to decide how to observe the traditions on your own terms. For example, I’ve seen family members order shrimp Caesar salad, hold the croutons, during Passover, or a cheeseburger—no bun.

In my house growing up, it wasn’t a Jewish holiday if the menu didn’t include brisket, which for us meant my mom’s chili sauce, onion soup mix and preserves concoction, which is truly delicious, and still one of our go-to favorites. But there’s another side to brisket: slightly less sweet, more southern and savory, and a great opportunity to let the oven do a lot of the hard work for you. What’s great about this recipe is that it will scratch the itch of your Jewish guests, to whom brisket is a holiday tradition, while also being a hearty main dish in an Easter celebration. By tweaking the recipe to be a bit more modern, everyone will be satisfied and not feel like they’re missing out on any dishes that might not be kosher for Passover.

Raw brisketThis is actually a great time of year to buy a brisket, as traditional Irish Corned Beef, often served on St. Patrick’s Day is made from the same cut of meat, and so is more widely available. The brisket is a cut of meat from the chest of the cow and has a great deal of connective tissue, so most recipes you’ll find use a “low and slow” approach in order to get the most tender end result. When buying a cut of meat, they are usually listed as either “first cut/flat cut” or “second cut/fat end.” Either is fine for this approach, although I prefer the fattier cut. Most Jewish style brisket dishes are a type of pot roast, but a southern style brisket usually starts with a dry rub, as this one does. Brisket is best when it’s made ahead of time: You can even make ahead and freeze until the day of your event. I suggest serving this with some lighter, springier fare,  like asparagus, orange and fennel salad, cauliflower kugel, and a lemon bar for dessert, as this dish is on the heavy side.

 

Kosher for Passover Southern Dry Rub Beef Brisket

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp onion powder
  • 1 Tbsp chili powder
  • 1 Tbsp smoked paprika
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 Tbsp black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp dried mustard
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 pounds brisket
  • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1.5 cups beef broth or stock

 

A note on this recipe: the ingredients, as they stand, are perfect for a year-round brisket, but if you are cooking this during Passover, please note the inclusion of mustard powder. Mustard is considered “kitnyot,” a category of food that some Jews do not consume during Passover. The category includes rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Many Ashkenazi Jews do not eat these foods during Passover, while many Sephardic Jews do. Certainly adhere to your level of Kashrut and the traditions you are most comfortable with when preparing food for Passover, and be sure to ask your guests what they observe before preparing food for them. If you’re not sure, just leave out the mustard.

Brisket cooking

Directions

Brisket cooked1. Preheat oven to 275

2. Combine all the spices together and rub on the meat, let sit for an hour if possible

Tip: apply rub generously, shake off excess. Even if you’re making a smaller cut of meat, use these proportions for the rub, and then you can store the extra.

3. Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pot/dutch oven

4. Brown the meat on all sides, just a minute or two on each side

5. Cook in the oven for 1 hour, uncovered

6. Add the broth or stock, tightly cover, and cook for another 3-4 hours, until the meat is fork tender.

To serve sliced traditionally, wait for meat to cool, and then slice against the grain to get long slices.

Another wonderful option, if you’re having a brunch, is to “pull” the meat, using two forks, and serve topped with a poached egg. You can even serve it on top of a potato latke for a more hearty brunch feel.

A third choice is to serve as an appetizer, shredded, on top of matzah crackers, and topped with a light BBQ sauce, for a sort of “sliders” feel.

It’s Not a Dilemma When it Comes to December Dinners

  

Sweet potato latkes

Growing up, latkes were always the purview of my dad and my grandma, but now that they’ve both passed away, the baton has been passed to me. Their latkes were the totally traditional, no frills, hand-grated style and they were served alongside my mom’s Corn Flake Chicken, a family friend’s homemade applesauce and my Great Aunt Shirley’s sweet and sour meatballs at our annual family and friends Hanukkah party.

The times have changed, however, and now our family is more spread out with the grandparents retired to Florida and siblings and cousins flung far and wide. While we’ll be celebrating Hanukkah in our house, we’ll also be traveling to Connecticut for Christmas with my sister-in-law, her husband, my nephew and their three fat cats. My in-laws will be up from Florida as well, and this is our only opportunity to celebrate any of the December holidays together, so, we’re doing it all at once!

For some families this is a time of tension, figuring out how to combine multiple faith traditions, but I think when it comes to food, eating together can only bring us together. I love traditional Jewish food, and will make my family’s latkes at some point during the holiday, but for our Hanukkah/Christmas in Connecticut, I’ll be bringing along these delicious baked sweet potato latkes which you need no prior latke-making experience to perfect!

Uncooked latkes

Latkes can get baked as easily as fried

At Hanukkah we usually eat foods that are fried—in memory of the oil that lasted for eight days—which is why latkes and sufganiyot (jelly-filled doughnuts) are often on the menu, but, when you’re cooking in someone else’s house, you might want to steer clear from the frying, lest you leave their whole house smelling of latkes until New Year’s. This recipe is really the best of both worlds, as it employs oil in the recipe, but they are not deep fried. They still come out incredibly crispy thanks to the finely-grated potatoes and onions and the help of the baking powder.

This recipe is incredibly versatile and once you learn the technique you can tweak it to include the spices you like the most. It pairs well with chicken, beef or fish, or could be served as an appetizer, topped with crème fraiche or a mango chutney. While my dad and grandma may have disapproved, I really need to take the help wherever I can get it during busy holiday dinners, so I’ll be taking advantage of my food processor when preparing these. Another tool that is a huge help in this recipe is a microplane to grate the fresh ginger.

Perfectly Crisp Baked Sweet Potato Latkes

Latke ingredientsIngredients
Makes about 12 latkes

  • 2 cups grated sweet potato
  • ½ cup grated onion
  • ¼ cup flour
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp. grated fresh ginger
  • ½ tsp. ginger powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. pepper
  • ¼ tsp. baking powder

 

Directions

Step by step
Fresh ginger, grated sweet potato and grated, strained onion
  1. Preheat oven to 400°F
  2. Peel and grate sweet potatoes (easiest to use grating disk on food processor, then squeeze out any liquid)
  3. Grate onion (using grating disk on food processor, then drain in fine mesh strainer, pushing liquid through with a spatula)
Mixed ingredients

Mix all of your bright ingredients together

4.    Combine all ingredients
5.    Using a ¼ cup measuring cup, form patties, place on greased cookie sheet, flatten down patties with a fork in a criss-cross pattern. (Alternatively, you could cook this as one LARGE pancake in a cast iron pan or a pie pan, and then cut it in slices to serve.)
6.    Bake for 25 minutes, flip and bake for 15 more minutes until crisp and slightly brown

Wishing you all the best as you celebrate this joyous time of year with your family or friends! Let us know how the cooking goes in the comments section below and for more Hanukkah recipes, click here.

Here are some links to my favorite products to use in this recipe, which could also be great holiday gifts for the foodie on your list:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Ruderman WilenskySarah Ruderman Wilensky is the founder of JewFood through which she teachers about Jewish values, culture, history and holidays through cooking and eating, because–what’s more Jewish than food? Sarah has been in the field of Jewish Education for over a decade, with experience in synagogues, camps and universities and currently works as the Jewish Educator at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Boston. Sarah has an undergraduate degree from Muhlenberg College in Theater Arts and studied in the MARE program at Hebrew Union College in New York.  She is also a StorahTelling trained Educator, has been a member of the National Association of Temple Educators, Hazon’s Jewish Food Educators Network and CJP’s Families with Young Children Community of Practice. Sarah lives near Boston with her husband, two young children and cat, Brisket.