Dulce de Manzana

  

dulce_apple_peeling_650_croppedWhen the Jewish New Year arrives, people often wish their family and friends a “sweet and fruitful New Year.” Because the holiday occurs right at the beginning of apple season, apples are the fruit of choice. People with ancestry from Eastern Europe and Russia ceremoniously dip apple wedges in honey to symbolize this good wish. Sephardic Jews, or Jews who can trace their ancestry back to Spain (“Sepharad” means “Spain” in Hebrew), and especially Turkish Jews, have another custom: dulce de manzana.

dulce_ingredients_650Dulce de manzana means “sweet of the apple,” and this delicious rose-scented apple preserve is spread on pieces of challah at the beginning of the Rosh Hashanah meal. It is so delicious that any leftovers stored in the refrigerator can be used for weeks as a spread on toast and sandwiches, or even as a base for small custard tarts. If you have an apple peeler (as shown in the photo) your children can help peel the apples while developing their gross motor skills. I also like to use the coarse blade on my food processor. The grating is fast and the apples don’t have time to discolor (although the little bit of lemon juice will rectify that). My last suggestion is to use firm apples as suggested in the recipe. That way the apple strands keep their shape and you won’t end up with applesauce!

DULCE de MANZANA

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 2 pounds apples (Granny Smith, Gala or Red Delicious)
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • 1 Tbsp. rosewater or 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ¼ cup slivered almonds

 

Directions:

1. Place the sugar and water in a 3 quart saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat.

2. While the mixture is heating, peel the apples and grate them by hand with a coarse grater or use a coarse grating disc on your processor. Immediately add the apples to the hot sugar syrup.

3. Reduce the temperature to medium and allow to cook for 30 -45 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated and the mixture is quite thick. (Note: the amount of time depends on the variety of apple and its juice content.) Stir the mixture occasionally to prevent sticking.

dulce_apples_in_pot_650

4. While mixture is cooking, toast the almonds in a 350F oven for 4 minutes or until lightly golden. Set aside.

5. When mixture is thickened (it will get thicker when it cools) add the rosewater or the vanilla and place in an open container until cool. The toasted almonds may be added to the mixture or sprinkled on top as a garnish. Refrigerate until serving.

dulce_on_stove_650

 

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples and Onions

  

Roasted_Vegetables-FPO_650

Apples, the symbolic fruit for the Jewish New Year, can find their way onto your holiday menu in many ways. This recipe may not have its origins in Europe or the Middle East, but it plays on the tradition of elevating even the simplest of ingredients into a festive dish.

I serve this as a side for brisket or chicken, but you can also combine it with quinoa or barley as a more substantial side dish or vegetarian main course. Although you can buy a whole butternut squash and peel and cube it yourself, I find it’s worth the time and money to buy the squash already peeled and cubed. You might have to cut some of the chunks into smaller pieces if they’re too large, but otherwise this is a fast and easy dish to make. You don’t even have to peel the apples!IMG_2987_650

Roasted Butternut Squash with Apples and Onions

Serves 6-8 as a side dish

Ingredients:

  • 1 large onion
  • 2 apples (Fuji, Honeycrisp or Jonagold)
  • 20 oz. cubed butternut squash (about 4-5 cups of 1-inch cubes)
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. minced fresh thyme or 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1 Tbsp. balsamic or pomegranate vinegar
  • Kosher salt
  • 20 grindings of black pepper or to taste
  • ½ cup dried cranberries or cherries
  • ¼ cup sunflower seeds or toasted pine nuts (optional)

 

Directions:sliced_onions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Cut onion in half and slice each piece crosswise into ½-inch strips. Place on a large rimmed baking sheet and set aside.

3. Using an apple slicer, cut apple into eighths and then cut each wedge into three or four chunks. Add to the onions, along with the squash cubes.

diced_apples_butternut_squash

4. Add the remaining ingredients and toss well. Arrange in a single layer and bake for 20 minutes. If onions are not yet golden and squash is still firm, gently turn the mixture and return to the oven for another 6 minutes, or until done.

toss_apples_squash

5. Remove from the oven. Sprinkle with dried cranberries and sunflower seeds and serve.

sprinkle_apples_squash_serve

Burmolikos: Bulgarian Matzah Puffs

  

Burmolikos for Passover

Missing morning carb treats like doughnuts? No need to stress if you are following the culinary traditions for Passover. Burmolikos are light, soft puffs of egg and matzah that are fried in oil (and bear no resemblance to heavy matzah fritters). They are a wonderful treat eaten by Bulgarian Jews during Passover and year-round because they are so delicious! Be sure to roll them with cinnamon and sugar while they’re still warm, or eat them with jam or honey.

Burmolikos (Bulgarian Matzah Puffs)
Makes 10-12 puffs

Ingredients:

  • 2 sheets plain matzah
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • Canola or cottonseed oil
  • ½ cup sugar mixed with ½ tsp. cinnamon
  • Jam or honey (optional)

 

Directions:

Burmolikos in oil1. Break the matzah into large pieces and soak in a bowl of warm water until soft, about 15 minutes.

2. Drain the matzah and squeeze handfuls until almost all of the water is removed. Place in a 2-quart bowl.

3. Add the eggs, egg yolk and salt to the clumps of matzah and combine well with a fork.

4. Heat the oil in a small saucepan or deep fryer to a depth of 2 inches—if you use a 1-quart saucepan you will use only about 1 cup oil and will only be able to make 2 puffs at a time. However, they cook quickly so it is up to you.

5. When the oil is hot, drop the mixture by oval soup spoon or ice cream scoop into the oil and fry on one side until golden, about 1-2 minutes. Turn over puff and fry on the other side until golden—another minute. Drain on crumpled paper towels (you use fewer towels and have more surface area to absorb the oil).

cooked burmolikos

 

Burmolikos in cinnamon

Coat with the sugar/cinnamon mixture. Burmolikos can also be served with jam or honey.

Some “Tina’s Tidbits”

  • This recipe is classically European since there is no sugar in the batter. Before you add some sugar, you might try adding 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract or a pinch of nutmeg to the batter to create a taste similar to a cake doughnut.
  • The puffs don’t need to be fried in a deep fryer. I used a 1-quart saucepan. This allows me to use less oil while still keeping the depth I need to make the Burmolikos initially submerge. I can only make 2 or 3 at a time, but they cook in less than 2 minutes and stay warm for at least 10-15 minutes.
  • Try using an ice cream scoop with a release wire for your batter. This will give you more rounded puffs.
  • This mixture puffs so well because the water in the soaked matzos turns to steam when it cooks in the hot oil.
  • If you use gluten-free matzos, this recipe is then gluten-free and dairy-free!

Burmolikos for Passover

Check out more delicious Passover recipes here!

 

Sweet Potato Pumpkin Cazuela for Sukkot

  

SweetPotatoCazuelaSukkot is synonymous with fall fruits and vegetables which are often used to decorate the sukkah. No specific foods are required but using the abundance of our local harvest replicates the Israelites bringing some of the bounty of their harvest to the Temple in Jerusalem. Making the long trek to the city, the travelers dwelled in temporary huts, or sukkahs, at the base of the Jerusalem hills.

It is customary to sleep and eat in the sukkah for eight days. In many climates this is not advisable, but eating in the temporary hut that has a lattice roof through which to view the stars was mandated in the Talmud on this holiday. Mandate aside, it is customary to invite friends and family to partake of a meal in your own sukkah (or to visit friends who have built one).

Dishes that are easily transported from your kitchen to the table outside are preferred and, of course, including nature’s fall produce is a must. Here is a side dish that can be made dairy with butter or parve (no milk or meat products) if anyone in your sukkah keeps kosher. It is Caribbean in origin, an area of the world where many Jews settled 400 years ago. You can, of course, bake your own sweet potatoes and small pie pumpkin to mash for this sweet potato pumpkin cazuela, but to save time and even allow your young children to help you make this recipe I call for canned pumpkin and sweet potatoes in light or no syrup.

One word of warning: This dish is so very delicious that I would double or triple the ingredients if you are making it for more than four people. And don’t forget Thanksgiving. But, please, hold the marshmallows—this is not a dessert, but could be served with any number of other dishes.

Sweet Potato Pumpkin Cazuela

Cazuela ingredientsIngredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter or coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. all purpose flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 5.6 ounce can unsweetened coconut milk (about 2/3 cup)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin puree (NOT pie filling)
  • 1 29-ounce can of yams in light syrup, drained and mashed
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/8 tsp. ground ginger
  • 2-inch stick of cinnamon broken into pieces
  • 1/4 tsp. fennel seeds
  • 3 whole cloves

 

Directions:

1.  Place the butter or coconut oil in a 2-quart Pyrex bowl and microwave for 45 seconds.

2.  Whisk the sugars, flour and salt into the butter to combine.

3.  Whisk the coconut milk into the mixture until thoroughly blended. Add the eggs and combine.

4.  Add the pumpkin puree and the mashed yams and whisk until a smooth batter is formed.

Spices and pumpkin puree

Pumpkin cazuela5.  Combine the water with the spices in a small glass cup and microwave for 3 ½ minutes. Let the spices steep for 5 minutes. Strain the spiced water through a fine mesh strainer into the pumpkin-potato mixture and stir to incorporate.

7.  Butter a 2-quart casserole and pour the mixture into the prepared dish.

8.  Bake covered in a pre-heated 350°F oven for 1 hour. Serve hot out of the oven or reheated warm or hot.

Happy Sukkot!

Tidbits:

Sugar pie pumpkins are about 1 ½ pounds and very rounded. Always use them when a recipe calls for cooked pumpkin. Larger pumpkins are more watery.

Coconut milk is not milk or dairy. It is the liquid formed from ground, fresh, hydrated coconut.

Traditional Rosh Hashanah Teiglach

  

TTEIGLACHeiglach is an eastern European confection most closely associated with Rosh Hashanah. It was often served for festive occasions such as a wedding, bar mitzvah or bris and in some communities during Shavuot or Simchat Torah because Torah is often equated with honey.

Teig in Yiddish means dough and Lach at the end of a word signifies small. Therefore Teiglach are little balls of baked dough submerged in honey syrup and then mixed with dried or candied cherries or raisins and some nuts (usually almond or hazelnut).

Once readily available in bakeries in large Jewish communities throughout North America, this confection is rapidly disappearing, so whether you were raised Jewish or not, this treat may be new to you. Not to worry if your own family doesn’t have the recipe; Teiglach is easy to make!

Even small children can help make the dough because no electric equipment is required and children enjoy rolling the dough into “snakes” while you can rapidly complete the task. However, children MUST NOT be involved with making the honey syrup, as the high temperature will certainly burn them if they accidentally touch the syrup before it cools. They can watch from afar and measure the awaiting dried fruit and nuts, but an adult must work alone while making the syrup and mixing all of the ingredients together.

The Teiglach may be served in a large pyramid or a few coated balls spooned into little paper cups. It is meant to be eaten with the fingers, pulling the balls off one by one and definitely licking one’s fingers afterwards!

L’Shanah Tova!

Teiglach

Ingredients:Teiglach Ingredients

  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 Tablespoons water
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1/4-teaspoon ginger
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 pound wildflower honey (any honey is O.K. but wildflower is the best)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon ginger
  • 1 piece of orange zest 2″ long 1/2 inch wide
  • 1 cup toasted hazelnuts
  • 1/2 cup candied cherries or raisins

 


Directions:

1.  Preheat the oven to 375°F.

2.  In a small bowl, combine the eggs, oil, water and vanilla and beat with a fork or whisk until light and combined. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, salt, ginger and baking powder.

3.  Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir with a fork until well combined.

Teiglach adding egg mixture

knead the dough4.  Knead with your hands for a few minutes until dough is smooth and shiny. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

5.  Roll out small balls of dough into long 1/2-inch wide snakes and cut into 1/3 inch pieces. Roll dough pieces briefly in your hands to make balls and place them on ungreased cookie sheets. Bake for 20 – 22 minutes or until golden brown. Cool completely or freeze until later use.

6.  When you are ready to complete recipe, combine the honey, sugar, orange zest and ginger in a heavy 3-quart saucepan and bring slowly to a boil. Simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add the teiglach balls, nuts and cherries or raisins to the honey mixture and stir to coat well. Place in a pie plate or individual tart tins mounded to form a pyramid.

 

 

 

Teiglach Syrup boiling

Teiglach Syrup cooking

 

IMG_0509IMG_0508Teiglach finished