Burmolikos: Bulgarian Matzah Puffs

  

Burmolikos for Passover

Missing morning carb treats like doughnuts? No need to stress if you are following the culinary traditions for Passover. Burmolikos are light, soft puffs of egg and matzah that are fried in oil (and bear no resemblance to heavy matzah fritters). They are a wonderful treat eaten by Bulgarian Jews during Passover and year-round because they are so delicious! Be sure to roll them with cinnamon and sugar while they’re still warm, or eat them with jam or honey.

Burmolikos (Bulgarian Matzah Puffs)
Makes 10-12 puffs

Ingredients:

  • 2 sheets plain matzah
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • Canola or cottonseed oil
  • ½ cup sugar mixed with ½ tsp. cinnamon
  • Jam or honey (optional)

 

Directions:

Burmolikos in oil1. Break the matzah into large pieces and soak in a bowl of warm water until soft, about 15 minutes.

2. Drain the matzah and squeeze handfuls until almost all of the water is removed. Place in a 2-quart bowl.

3. Add the eggs, egg yolk and salt to the clumps of matzah and combine well with a fork.

4. Heat the oil in a small saucepan or deep fryer to a depth of 2 inches—if you use a 1-quart saucepan you will use only about 1 cup oil and will only be able to make 2 puffs at a time. However, they cook quickly so it is up to you.

5. When the oil is hot, drop the mixture by oval soup spoon or ice cream scoop into the oil and fry on one side until golden, about 1-2 minutes. Turn over puff and fry on the other side until golden—another minute. Drain on crumpled paper towels (you use fewer towels and have more surface area to absorb the oil).

cooked burmolikos

 

Burmolikos in cinnamon

Coat with the sugar/cinnamon mixture. Burmolikos can also be served with jam or honey.

Some “Tina’s Tidbits”

  • This recipe is classically European since there is no sugar in the batter. Before you add some sugar, you might try adding 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract or a pinch of nutmeg to the batter to create a taste similar to a cake doughnut.
  • The puffs don’t need to be fried in a deep fryer. I used a 1-quart saucepan. This allows me to use less oil while still keeping the depth I need to make the Burmolikos initially submerge. I can only make 2 or 3 at a time, but they cook in less than 2 minutes and stay warm for at least 10-15 minutes.
  • Try using an ice cream scoop with a release wire for your batter. This will give you more rounded puffs.
  • This mixture puffs so well because the water in the soaked matzos turns to steam when it cooks in the hot oil.
  • If you use gluten-free matzos, this recipe is then gluten-free and dairy-free!

Burmolikos for Passover

Check out more delicious Passover recipes here!

 

Grain-Free/Vegan (mini) Chocolate Berry Pies

  

Passover dessert

Hello InterfaithFamily readers! My name is Whitney Fisch and I am beyond honored to be able to create recipes and write for this wonderful website. So here’s a bit about me:

I was born and raised in Marietta, Georgia. I’m the daughter of a Jewish mama and a Christian dad. My mom raised me within the Reform Jewish community. Throughout my childhood, my mom was incredibly active within our temple community, at one point as the founding member of what is now one of the larger Reform temples in metropolitan Atlanta (can you tell I’m proud of my mom!?).

In 2008, after living all over the map and working for various Jewish organizations, I decided to sell all my stuff, drop my dog off at mom’s house and head to Israel for the year to learn at the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies. While there (and immersed in an incredible multi-cultural learning environment), I met the man I would later marry. We got hitched in Asheville, North Carolina, in 2010 (we were the very first kosher wedding to hit the town—we even made the local paper! Huzzah! Take that, Kardashians! Who’s the celebrity now!?).

We now live in Los Angeles, where I work as the Director of Counseling at a private Jewish school and my husband is finishing his Ph.D. in Marine Biology. We have two beloved daughters, one finicky lemon tree and a lot of love . . . and babka. We love babka. We also LOVE to eat. It’s with this love of eating that brings me to food writing on my personal blog, Jewhungry and is what brings me to InterfaithFamily. I look forward to getting to know you, dear reader!

I developed the following recipe a few years ago during the ‘grain-free’ craze of 2013. It wasn’t until I hosted my first seder later that year that I realized this recipe is THE PERFECT recipe for a seder dessert. It doesn’t require any grains and is so incredibly easy to make as it requires no baking. In addition, it celebrates the fruits of the season and what is Passover but a celebration of the harvest! I hope you enjoy!

berry pie shell

berry pie shells

Fill your berry pies

Mini berry pie

 

Mini Vegan Chocolate Chip Berry Pies + Coconut Milk Whipped Cream

Ingredients for Crust:

Adapted from my own recipe for Raw Brownie Bites

  • 2 cups of dates, seeded and chopped
  • 4 Tbsp. almond meal
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 2 1/2 Tbsp. milled flaxseed
  • 3 heaping Tbsp. vegan cocoa powder*
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp. organic maple syrup (depending upon your taste—start with 1 and if you make it again, up to 2 if it wasn’t sweet enough for you)

*Extra cocoa for rolling the bites in afterwards if you want an extra chocolate punch

Coconut Milk Whipped Cream (Recipe straight from my girl, Samantha, at The Little Ferraro Kitchen)

Note: chill your mixer for best results

  • 1 can coconut milk, chilled
  • 2 Tbsp. powdered sugar

 

Mixed Berry Filling:

  • 1/2 cup strawberries, hulled and chopped
  • 1/4 cup blackberries, chopped
  • 1/4 cup raspberries, chopped
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 Tbsp. Demerara sugar

 

Directions:

Crust

I used regular-sized muffin tins to shape the crusts, but a ramekin will work just as well.

1.  Cut pieces of parchment paper into squares about 8 in. by 8 in. or large enough that when placed into the muffin tins there is an excess of paper sticking out.

2.  Place all ingredients in a food processor. Process until well combined—to about the count of 30 or until the ingredients have a dough-like consistency. If you feel like it’s a bit dry due to too many walnuts or almond meal, just add a bit of water, about 1 Tbsp. at a time, until you get that doughy consistency.

3.  Once you’ve attained your desired consistency, scoop out enough “dough” to form a ball about the size of a tennis ball. Gently press the dough ball into the parchment paper-lined muffin tin and shape to the entirety of the tin so that a “crust” forms. Your crust should be thick enough to hold the filling but thin enough so that it doesn’t take over the pie flavor. Do this until you run out of dough. Refrigerate uncovered for at least 30 minutes.

Coconut Milk Whipped Cream

1.  If you haven’t already, open the coconut milk can and pour out the water in a separate bowl. (Save it and use for smoothies, soups, etc.) If you’ve been chilling your coconut milk in the refrigerator for several hours in prep for this recipe, the watery part of the coconut milk will be at the bottom of the can so pour slowly and make sure to omit the watery part at the end.

2.  Pour the thicker coconut milk into your chilled mixer and begin to whip starting on low and gradually moving to medium-high setting. As soon as it begins to thicken, add powdered sugar and continue to beat. Check every so often for desired consistency.

Fruit Filling

Place all your chopped fruit into a mixing bowl. Add the lemon juice and sugar and mix until well combined.

Assembly

Once your crusts have refrigerated, scoop fruit filling into each pie; enough so that the is a mound of fruit filling. Top with a dollop or two (or three) of whipped cream. Enjoy!

Read more delicious Passover recipes here!

Deviled Egg Cobb Salad

  

Passover cobb salad

Legend has it that the Cobb salad was the result of a midnight kitchen raid by a hungry restaurant owner, namely Robert H. Cobb, at Hollywood’s Brown Derby restaurant. Brown Derby was a restaurant chain popular in the golden age of Hollywood. The chain lives on in Ohio and Orlando. Although the original Brown Derby in Hollywood, which was shaped like the classic round hat, is long gone, the legendary midnight snack that became the Cobb salad lives on and is going strong on menus all across the country. This Deviled Egg Cobb Salad with Smoked Salmon Matzah Tartines makes the perfect all-in-one Passover meal.

The salty crunch that usually comes from bacon is replaced with roasted, salted sunflowers. For more smokiness, the optional addition of smoked Gouda is delectable.

Passover cobb salad with salmon tartine

Deviled Egg Cobb Salad
(serves 4 as a main course or 6 as a side dish)

Ingredients:

Brown Derby Dressing

  • 3/4 cup of canola or grapeseed oil
  • 1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup of red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 a lemon for 1 Tbsp. of fresh lemon juice and zest
  • 3/4 tsp. dry mustard
  • 1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 tsp. white granulated sugar
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • salt and pepper to taste

 

Cobb Salad ingredientsDeviled Egg Cobb Salad

  •  4 eggs, hard boiled
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. mayonnaise
  • 1 Tbsp. sour cream
  • 1/8 tsp. dry mustard
  • lemon zest (from the lemon used in the dressing)
  • 1 bunch butter lettuce, washed and dried
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 avocado
  • 4 Tbsp. of roasted, salted, sunflower seeds
  • smoked Gouda or a nice blue cheese like Roquefort or Bleu D’Auvergne, optional
  • 1 beet, optional, to serve with matzah tartines (optional)
  •  4 pieces of matzah
  • chive and herb soft cheese like Boursin
  • smoked salmon
  • 1/2 avocado (left over from the salad)
  • deviled egg filling (left over from the salad)
  • salt, pepper and lemon zest (left over from the dressing)

 

Cobb salad platterDirections:

1.  Hard boil four eggs. I like to use J. Kenji Alt’s method. While the eggs are cooking, you can prepare the salad dressing.

2.  In a jar with a lid mix all the dressing ingredients together: canola or grapeseed oil, extra virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar, fresh lemon juice, dry mustard, Worcestershire sauce, white granulated sugar and minced garlic. Add a 1/4 tsp. of salt and pepper. Taste by dipping a leaf of lettuce into the dressing. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.

3. You can toss the salad together in a bowl or set it out on a platter in horizontal layers. Chop the washed and dried lettuce into bite-size pieces. Chop the tomatoes into small cubes and sprinkle with a pinch of kosher salt. Cut the avocado in half and save half for the matzah tartines. Cube the avocado in the peel with a butter knife and then scoop it out with a soup spoon. Lay out each ingredient along the platter. Sprinkle four tablespoons of sunflowers over the avocado. If you are using cheese, grate or make small cubes of cheese to add to the salad either on the platter or separately in a dish to be added at the table. I like to serve the dressing on the side so everyone can put on as little or as much as they like.

Mashed eggs4. Now prepare your deviled eggs. Peel the eggs and cut them in half from top to bottom. Put the yolks into a bowl and add the mayonnaise, sour cream, dry mustard and a pinch of salt. Mash it all together until smooth.

With a spoon, add a dollop of filling to each egg. You can also pipe the filling if you want to get fancy, but I like to just use a butter knife to cleanly even off the filling in each egg so it looks like a regular egg. I save the extra filling for my tartines.

 

 

 

spiraled beets
5.
 Spiralizers have become very popular, so if you have one this is a great time to use it. Peel your raw beet and run it through the spiralizer.  Add the spirals of beet to the platter and place your deviled eggs on top of the beets.

6.  In a few small bowls set out your tartine spreads: the soft herb cheese, the extra deviled egg filling (topped with the lemon zest) and mashed avocado topped with a little finishing salt. (Kosher salt is good, or some Maldon sea salt or smoked salt.) Put the smoked salmon on a plate.

The matzah tartines can be assembled at the table to keep the matzah crisp.

Read more delicious Passover recipes here!

Cobb salad for Passover

 

Dairy Matzah Kugel for Passover

  

Matzah Kugel served with gefilte fish and side salad

Some people have strong feelings about the kind of recipe that aims to create a Passover-friendly version of a dish that is typically leavened. Detractors think creating Passover bagels, muffins, and rolls miss the point of the holiday’s specific diet. Those in favor see the practice as helping to make a difficult holiday more bearable. Some will even point to foods like Passover Popovers as an example of Jewish ingenuity.

Personally, I fall somewhere in the middle. I don’t see the point suffering through a week of “I can’t believe you want to call this a bagel.” (But hey, if you can convince yourself that whatever you’ve come up with tastes like a bagel, more power to you. I’ll have eggs for breakfast this week.) On the other hand, when the introduction of matzah into a dish creates a delightful new twist on an old favorite, I’m all for it.

This brings us to Matzah Kugel, a sweet, dairy-filled confection of matzah layered with sweetened cheese. Sure, you could make a kugel with Passover noodles and come up with an almost-but-not-quite-satisfying proxy for the regular version, but you will never forget that it’s not the “real” thing. Matzah kugel, on the other hand, takes the idea of a noodle kugel as a jumping off point and transforms it into something different but equally delicious.

This dish can function as a side dish or a main course. (It pairs well with a side salad and a piece of gefilte fish.) You can freeze leftover portions: they reheat well in the microwave and even make a delicious and quick breakfast when you just can’t take one more piece of matzah with cream cheese.

Cheese Matzah Kugel for Passover

(Serves 9)

Kugel ingredientsIngredients:

  • 6 sheets matzah, broken into large pieces
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 pound cottage cheese
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons melted butter, plus additional butter to grease the pan

 

Directions:

Matzah layered in the baking dish1.  Preheat oven to 350°F. In a mixing bowl, beat together the eggs and milk.

2.  Add cottage cheese, salt, sugar, cinnamon, and butter and mix to combine thoroughly.

3.  Grease an 8 inch square baking dish with butter.

4.  Arrange half of the matzah so that it covers the bottom of the dish.

5.  Pour half of the cheese mixture over it. Repeat with balance of the matzah and cheese mixture. If you wish, sprinkle additional cinnamon and sugar over the top of the kugel.

6.  Bake at 350°F for 40 minutes or until set.

The matzah kugel when it's done baking

Ice Cream Pyramids for Jon Stewart (and You)

  

Ice Cream Pyramid

Jon Stewart, born Jonathan Leibowitz, is one of America’s best known Jews, and also in an inter-faith marriage. In 2012, as Passover and Easter were approaching Stewart encouraged Jews to up the ante on Passover as it wasn’t competing very well against Easter, especially for kids. In the “Faith Off” clip below, from The Daily Show, he says where Easter has chocolate, Passover has Matzah. Where Easter has Peeps, Passover has hard boiled eggs. You get the idea.

 

“Oh wait, I’ll see you over at the Red Sea ride when I’m done building ice cream pyramids.”

What about spicing things up, Jon asks? What about ice cream pyramids? Well Jon, in honor of your last Passover behind that Comedy Central desk where we’ve come to depend on you to deliver us news we can actually digest, we’re giving you just what you asked for: Ice Cream Pyramids.

This is a great way to get your kids excited about the upcoming Passover holiday, and if you’re serving a non-meat seder or Passover meal during the week of the holiday, this could certainly be the piece-de-resistance to serve as dessert.

When I started this experiment I had hoped to build a pyramid using small blocks of ice cream, similar to this sugar cube pyramid. But no matter how solid the ice cream was, or how quickly I worked, it wasn’t to be. So, plan B!

What you’ll need:

ice cream pyramids prep

  • 1 gallon of ice cream
  • Cutting Board
  • Large serrated knife/chef’s knife
  • Chocolate, caramel, chopped nuts, Nutella (or toppings of  your choice)

Before you begin:

Choose a gallon of your favorite ice cream that comes in a rectangular box. Make sure it is frozen solid.

Place your cutting board and a serrated knife in the freezer so that the ice cream won’t melt as quickly.

Clear space in the freezer for the finished product.

Instructions:

Cut the ice cream1.  Cut the box away so that you’re left with just a large block of ice cream.

2.  Cut the ice cream so that you have 1-inch thick square slices.

3.  Start by placing a square on the cold cutting board, and then, if desired, cover with favorite ice cream topping, then continue to layer the same way using all of the ice cream.

4.  You may need to re-freeze at a few points along the way if the ice cream is melting too quickly.

5.  Next comes the carving. Each piece, from bottom to top, should be trimmed with your knife so that it’s slightly smaller than the last, until you’re at a small point for the top of the pyramid. You can then leave as is, or smooth the sides to be flat.

Layer ice cream

ice_cream_top

 

6.  Continue by decorating the sides with chocolate chips, peanut butter chips, etc.

7.  Then place in freezer to re-firm.

8.  The end result is delicious, and the process is fun! You can set this up as a race between a few teams to see who can build the pyramid the quickest, or set a timer and see which group could build the tallest pyramid in the allotted time. Traditionally, matzah is only kosher for Passover if it’s made in 18 minutes or less, so you could try setting an 18-minute limit for your game as well.

 

 

 

 

Finished product

9.  As soon as it’s completed, place the finished product in the freezer to let it firm up before serving. You may actually have to let it set in the freezer as you go, depending on how quickly you are assembling it.

10.  To finish off, you can drizzle some chocolate sauce or caramel on top.

Chag sameach (happy holiday)! Please share your ice cream pyramid photos on InterfaithFamily’s Facebook page!

Passover & Easter Coexist in Southern Dry-Rub Brisket

  

table settingBrisketThere can certainly be challenges when melding two faith traditions, and at no time of year does that seem more evident than when Passover and Easter overlap. This is no coincidence, as the Last Supper is thought to possibly have been a seder meal, and the holidays share a great deal of symbolism and significance. But what are you to do when preparing a meal for your relatives on Easter that also needs to be kosher for Passover? What if you’re attending an Easter meal but your family is keeping Passover? Here’s the perfect recipe to share with your host so they can plan a meal that’s sensitive to Passover without giving up any of the delicacy of a big Easter meal.

Passover is the most widely celebrated Jewish holiday, so while many Jews are non-observant during the rest of the year, Passover is a time when it can feel good to participate in a holiday outside the synagogue that has clear rituals around food. Not everyone follows these restrictions in the same way, and it’s a time when you have the ability to decide how to observe the traditions on your own terms. For example, I’ve seen family members order shrimp Caesar salad, hold the croutons, during Passover, or a cheeseburger—no bun.

In my house growing up, it wasn’t a Jewish holiday if the menu didn’t include brisket, which for us meant my mom’s chili sauce, onion soup mix and preserves concoction, which is truly delicious, and still one of our go-to favorites. But there’s another side to brisket: slightly less sweet, more southern and savory, and a great opportunity to let the oven do a lot of the hard work for you. What’s great about this recipe is that it will scratch the itch of your Jewish guests, to whom brisket is a holiday tradition, while also being a hearty main dish in an Easter celebration. By tweaking the recipe to be a bit more modern, everyone will be satisfied and not feel like they’re missing out on any dishes that might not be kosher for Passover.

Raw brisketThis is actually a great time of year to buy a brisket, as traditional Irish Corned Beef, often served on St. Patrick’s Day is made from the same cut of meat, and so is more widely available. The brisket is a cut of meat from the chest of the cow and has a great deal of connective tissue, so most recipes you’ll find use a “low and slow” approach in order to get the most tender end result. When buying a cut of meat, they are usually listed as either “first cut/flat cut” or “second cut/fat end.” Either is fine for this approach, although I prefer the fattier cut. Most Jewish style brisket dishes are a type of pot roast, but a southern style brisket usually starts with a dry rub, as this one does. Brisket is best when it’s made ahead of time: You can even make ahead and freeze until the day of your event. I suggest serving this with some lighter, springier fare,  like asparagus, orange and fennel salad, cauliflower kugel, and a lemon bar for dessert, as this dish is on the heavy side.

 

Kosher for Passover Southern Dry Rub Beef Brisket

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp onion powder
  • 1 Tbsp chili powder
  • 1 Tbsp smoked paprika
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 Tbsp black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp dried mustard
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 pounds brisket
  • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1.5 cups beef broth or stock

 

A note on this recipe: the ingredients, as they stand, are perfect for a year-round brisket, but if you are cooking this during Passover, please note the inclusion of mustard powder. Mustard is considered “kitnyot,” a category of food that some Jews do not consume during Passover. The category includes rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Many Ashkenazi Jews do not eat these foods during Passover, while many Sephardic Jews do. Certainly adhere to your level of Kashrut and the traditions you are most comfortable with when preparing food for Passover, and be sure to ask your guests what they observe before preparing food for them. If you’re not sure, just leave out the mustard.

Brisket cooking

Directions

Brisket cooked1. Preheat oven to 275

2. Combine all the spices together and rub on the meat, let sit for an hour if possible

Tip: apply rub generously, shake off excess. Even if you’re making a smaller cut of meat, use these proportions for the rub, and then you can store the extra.

3. Heat the oil in a heavy bottomed pot/dutch oven

4. Brown the meat on all sides, just a minute or two on each side

5. Cook in the oven for 1 hour, uncovered

6. Add the broth or stock, tightly cover, and cook for another 3-4 hours, until the meat is fork tender.

To serve sliced traditionally, wait for meat to cool, and then slice against the grain to get long slices.

Another wonderful option, if you’re having a brunch, is to “pull” the meat, using two forks, and serve topped with a poached egg. You can even serve it on top of a potato latke for a more hearty brunch feel.

A third choice is to serve as an appetizer, shredded, on top of matzah crackers, and topped with a light BBQ sauce, for a sort of “sliders” feel.