Article Discussion: The Seder Meal: A Cooking Marathon of Heroic Proportions

HomeDiscussionsPassover and EasterArticle Discussion: The Seder Meal: A Cooking Marathon of Heroic Proportions

This topic has 3 voices, contains 5 replies, and was last updated by  Debbie B. 1627 days ago.

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March 15, 2010 at 4:52 pm #4443

admin

Click here to read the article: The Seder Meal: A Cooking Marathon of Heroic Proportions

March 17, 2010 at 1:43 am #4452

shiksa2

Great article! Didn’t know your site existed till today, found you through the Shiksa fan page on Facebook. I love Tori’s writing, and her recipes are AMAZING. I’m a Shiksa myself, married for five years to an amazing Jewish man. My family uses the word as a cute nickname and it always makes everybody smile. =)

March 17, 2010 at 3:18 am #4453

Dave LA

Tori Avey knows more about Jewish cooking, and dare I say, Judaism than most Jewish-born Americans I know (myself included). What she is doing with her writing and her cooking is a mitzvah. She writes with an open heart, tireless dedication to and the deepest respect for our (and now her) people, traditions, and culture. Her desire to reclaim the Yiddish term “Shiksa” comes from this place of love and respect that her writing embodies. As far as I am concerned, she can call herself anything she wants to. Her good and valuable work speaks for itself.

March 17, 2010 at 5:45 pm #4457

Elliot

Great tips! I love Manischewitz matza balls, so fluffy! Usually I cook them in water first, but I will try it directly in the soup like this writer suggests.

March 17, 2010 at 5:48 pm #4458

Nava

I love everything the Shiksa in the kitchen suggests — Can’t wait for her book to come out.

March 21, 2010 at 3:27 am #4463

Debbie B.

This article reminded me that this is also my first Passover as a Jew (I converted right after Passover last year), even though I cooked for the first seder we hosted as a young married couple more than 20 years ago.

One comment on using Sephardic recipes, be careful that they don’t use “kitniyot” such as rice, corn, beans, seeds, etc, if your guests are Ashkenazi. This is implied, but not spelled out in Tori’s first two points concerning kashrut.

Also beware of conflicting afikomen traditions: one year my daughter as the oldest child carefully choreographed an intricate “steal the afikomen” ruse as complicated as a football passing play and involving each of the five children. Unfortunately, one of our adult guests was used to the opposite convention in which an *adult* steals the afikomen, so he ruined the whole plot.

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