The Anglo-Jewish School Case, Revisited

Over the summer, we blogged about a British Court of Appeals decision that involves the British government in the question of who is a Jew. In short, a student applied to London’s JFS (formerly the Jews Free School, largest Jewish school in Europe) and was rejected on the grounds that his mother’s conversion to Judaism was not acceptable to the Chief Rabbi of the United Congregations of the Commonwealth. The family sued the school, and lost, and then won on appeal.

Last week, the New York Times reported on the progress of the case to the British Supreme Court.

There’s a lot of backstory to this case, some of it having to do with the structure of British society and the place of Anglo-Jewry within it.  There are 97 Jewish schools in the UK out of 7,000 publicly financed religious schools. All of the Jewish schools are under the auspices of the United Synagogue and therefore nominally Orthodox–but not all of them restrict their admissions to Jewish students. At least one, the King David School in Birmingham, a city with a shrinking Jewish population, is 50% Muslim. Many Christian schools of various denominations require religious practice tests–but they don’t have the challenge of not being able to write on their Sabbath when students go to worship, as Jewish students do.

Another piece of the backstory is the general acceleration of moral panic over self-definition that seems to have afflicted the entire Jewish people in the last year and a half, with the Israeli high rabbinical court declaring conversions invalid after the fact on what seem from my perspective to be entirely spurious grounds. In Britain, according to Miriam Shaviv in The Forward, the Chief Rabbi had already declared in 2005 that two women who’d converted in Israel (and therefore with an an Orthodox rabbinical court) weren’t Jewish enough for the United Synagogue, because they weren’t Jewish enough to pass muster with Haredi (trembling, or far-right Orthodox) Jewish authorities on the rabbinical court. Those families didn’t fight back–the family of the child in the present case, who was rejected in 2007, did. (Shaviv points out that the judge who ruled in the family’s favor on the appeals court is Jewish.)

I need to write at length about this moral panic over conversion and self-definition, because it’s incredibly painful for a lot of people in our lives. It’s probably enough for now to say that even with all the backstory, I can’t understand the rationale for keeping motivated kids out of a great Jewish school, or taking the risk of getting the government involved in that school’s admissions policy.

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2 thoughts on “The Anglo-Jewish School Case, Revisited

  1. Ruth–

    I appreciate the added details and backstory you provide here, and the fact that you covered this case in the summer. I’m curious about why you twice refer to the panic over self-identification as a “moral panic.” To me, the panic is about fear of ethnic assimilation, and (to me, unfounded) fear of religious assimilation leading to the disappearance of Jews. I don’t see what any of this has to do with morality, but I may be missing something.

    For my perspective on this case as a “patrilineal half-Jew” go to http://onbeingboth.wordpress.com/wp-adm … t&post=289

    Sue

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