Drew and Will’s Wedding

Mazal tov to Drew Barrymore and Will Kopelman! They’ve made their wedding date (June 2) public.

E! Online suggests the rushed wedding date is because she’s pregnant (they refer to the upcoming wedding as “bumptastic”), but I have  a different theory.

Traditionally, the time between Passover and Shavuot is a period of semi-mourning. The period is known as the Omer. But what’s an “Omer”? It was a unit of measurement used for counting barley sheaves brought as an offering to the Temple in ancient Israel. The 49 days from Passover to Shavuot were each marked with a sacrifice of barley; today we count the days (“counting the Omer”) instead.

The rabbis of the 2nd century saw the period of counting the Omer as a “semi-mourning” period. As a result, some Jews refrain from having weddings or parties, dancing, listening to music or getting haircuts — all of which are customarily avoided during shiva (first week of mourning) — during the Omer.

There’s one escape from these restrictions: a minor holiday called Lag BaOmer (or “Lag b’Omer”) that falls on May 10 this year, 33 days after the start of Passover. The name literally translates to “33rd (day) of the Omer.” On Lag BaOmer, the restrictions are lifted for the day. (Check out how one Californian handles the restrictions in this humorous video.)

But back to Drew and Will.

E! Online reports that the wedding will be small and intimate, taking place at Drew’s home (er, “estate”). And, “keeping in line with the traditional values of Kopelman’s close-knit family, his family rabbi is expected to conduct the service.”

Since we’re currently counting the Omer, and since Will’s family (and, presumably, rabbi) are “traditional,” maybe they’re not wanting to be married during the Omer. Which would mean the first chance to be wed would be May 10, a Thursday. Most Americans choose to marry on the weekend so that family and friends can travel to and from the event. Not so easy to do in the middle of the work week. So the next option would be waiting until a weekend after Shavuot. Shavuot starts the evening of May 26 and ends the night of May 27 (for some communities, including many Reform congregations) or the night of May 28 (for the rest of the Jewish communities). The next weekend after that? Yup, June 2.

You heard it here first: Drew Barrymore and her fiancé, Will Kopelman, are following the laws of the Omer.

The Shavuot Hodgepodge

Getting ready for Shavuot, which starts tomorrow night, I thought I’d share some of the interesting, amusing, and helpful tidbits I’ve found online in the last little while. That’s right, it’s time for the Shavuot Hodgepodge!

One of my favorite Storahtellers, Naomi Less, teamed up with G-dcast to bring us The Ten Commandments – A Song for Shavuot:

If a musical ten commandments isn’t your speed, you might prefer the Butter Ten Commandments, which combines the “eat dairy yumminess” of the holiday with the ten commandments, resulting in butter sculptures of each commandment. (Seriously, who comes up with this stuff??)

On DovBear (a blog I’ve been reading for, oh, 8 years now?), there are two interesting looks at the story of Ruth. The first examines how, in the Book of Ruth, the betrothal story does not follow the pattern of other biblical betrothals. The second follows up on this premise, wondering if the reversed betrothal is in response to the story of Judah and Tamar. Interesting. And something new to bring to your up-all-night learning sessions Tuesday night…

Over on Jewschool, a video “about revelation” called “Mountain Day” by the posted, but titled Shavuos on YouTube, was posted. It didn’t seem too popular with their readers (check out the comments) but the universal ties between the revelation of the Torah at Mt Sinai (one of the themes of Shavuot) and other revelations (like the Universal Declaration of Human Rights) might speak to some of you:

Tablet has a bunch of great stuff for Shavuot. There’s the Field Study of why Shavuot is such an ignored holiday in America:

“They used to say that Jewish holidays needed mazel,” or luck, Sarna says. Hanukkah and Passover—located next to major Christian holidays that Jews want an alternative to—have mazel. Shavuot, marooned in the long stretch between Passover and the High Holidays, has the opposite. “Passover is the last Jewish gesture of the year before you disappear into summer camp, Memorial Day, et cetera,” Bachman says.

And At Sinai, an article about why a recent convert to Judaism loves Shavuot. It also includes this great line:

“Shavuot!” she said scornfully. “Of all the Jewish holidays! It’s like the ugly girl at the party that everyone feels obliged to dance with.”

Then there’s Mother’s Little Helper, on holidays and raising a Jewish child; Got Milk, looking at the complicated history of Jews and dairy; and All Night Long, an audio interview with novelist Nathan Englander, musician Alicia Jo Rabins, Rabbi Phil Lieberman, and theologian Avivah Zornberg about what they’ll be studying this Shavuot.

Now you’re armed with all sorts of fun to kick the holiday off tomorrow (Tuesday) evening. Chag sameach!

Summer Reading

My 3-year-old recently discovered television.  He can turn on the television and search the channels for Dora the Explorer!  Though there is a time and a place for a television, mainly when Mommy needs to get something done, I am hoping this addiction wanes.    Luckily, I have help from the PJ Library!

Every month a new book or CD arrives.  Each book is well illustrated and brings up a different Jewish value or holiday.  I am actually saved our April book, No Rules for Michael by Sylvia Rouss, for this week.  This age-appropriate book about the role rules have in our life is perfect for Shavuot, when we celebrate revelation and the receiving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai.

If your child is not already enrolled in the PJ Library, please consider enrolling them in this program.   The PJ Library is a national program which reaches many communities.  I was glad to hear that InterfaithFamily.com’s friends at the PJ Library Program of Greater Boston are now accepting new subscribers ages 0-5 years old. Children enrolled in the PJ Library receive a FREE high quality Jewish children’s book or CD each month for a year. There is no catch and no obligation.

Children of Hidden Jews

I saw a short item, “Polish-language guide to Shavuot distributed.” An organization called Shavei Israel which does outreach to people with Jewish roots or ancestry around the world, prepared the pamphlet.

Children of hidden Jews are, for the most part, children of interfaith marriages. In the Polish case this looks nothing at all like interfaith marriage in the United States–the level of anti-Semitism in Poland and the lack of freedom of religion means that hidden Jews are also people whose Jewish roots were hidden from them.

The interesting thing is that this outreach, which is entirely to people who descended from interfaith families, is under Orthodox auspices and the organization has on its website that it is “under the ongoing supervision of the Chief Rabbinate of the State of Israel.”

New Parenting Resource in Time for Shavuot

This Thursday evening is the beginning of Shavuot, the Jewish holiday when we celebrate the revelation of the Torah at Mt. Sinai. It is actually quite a fun holiday. One tradition for the holiday is to stay up all night studying Torah at a community event called the Tikkun Leil Shavuot. There is also a custom to eat dairy food on this holiday. One reason I’ve heard for this custom is that prior to the giving of the Torah, the Jewish people did not know the kosher laws. Once they learned them, they realized that they weren’t eating meat properly, so they had to eat meatless meals. Perhaps that’s why we eat dairy meals today.

This year I am struggling with how to make this holiday meaningful for my family. I do not have the energy to stay up all night and I certainly don’t want to give my two year old son any such idea! So far, I am planning to retell him the story of Ruth and Naomi, which is chanted on Shavuot morning at the synagogue. We will make a lasagna and chocolate milk together. We are also going to our neighbors for a dairy dinner. Other great ideas for Shavuot with children are available on Jewish Everyday website.

I was recently introduced to Jewish Everyday and its creator, the Bible Belt Balabusta. I am much impressed with its multi-denominational approach and the way it offers ideas from different bloggers and Jewish organizations — including ours — on how to introduce Jewish living to your children not only on Shabbat and holidays, but every day. I have already book marked it.