Noah and The Flood: What You Don’t Know

What to say about this Torah portion, Noah (Genesis chapters 6 – 10)? There are just so many different ways to view this narrative.  Many people like to think of the story of Noah’s Ark, the flood and the rainbow as a children’s story, and that’s fine–as long as you don’t look too closely at it.  Because once you take a closer look, you will understand that not only did all the depraved human beings drown in this cataclysm sent by God to undo all of God’s own recent creation, all of the innocent babies, children, and animals also drowned, except of course, the fish, other sea creatures, and those saved on the ark.

So, first, let’s agree that this is more than a child’s fable, and it raises disturbing questions.

For the basic outline of the story, take a look at g-dcast  for this parasha:

Who was Noah?  Was he a “righteous man” as described in chapter 6 verse 9? And what does that mean?  The rest of the phrase describing him is that he “was a righteous man IN HIS GENERATION.”  The rabbis of the Talmud debate:  does this mean Noah was absolutely pious and good, with the right moral compass or rather, that he was just a good-enough fellow, and good only in comparison with the absolutely debased human beings populating the earth at that time?  What do you think?

Then, let’s agree that this biblical story has much in common with the ancient Epic of Gilgamesh, the Sumerian tale recorded on clay tablets dating back to at least 2000 BCE, based on some even older accounts, written in archaic poetic style, found in the geographical area of what is today modern Iraq.  Contemporary scholars believe that the biblical account fuses several traditions of near-eastern flood stories, and although there are dozens of similarities, the biblical authors have a different purpose in mind when they re-tell the story of the Flood.  Instead of warring gods on a quest for immortality, the narrative in the Hebrew Bible is an argument for a Creator who demands adherence to a universal moral code. From this story, western civilization derives something called the Noahide Laws, which seem to be a precursor to the Ten Commandments and are laws incumbent upon all people, not just the Hebrews.

Finally, Noah gets off his Ark and builds an altar to God; he is witness to the sign of the covenant (the rainbow) when God promises never to destroy creation again with a flood.  And what does he do? Plants a vineyard. And when the grapes are ripe, he gets rip-roaring drunk (chapter 9 verse 21).  Why do you suppose this is included in this iconic story?   And what do we think of the way his sons react and the consequences for the family? (verses 22-27)  This is definitely some R-rated material, not just for kids!

If you’re intrigued by the more “mature content” of this story, here are links to reading material that may catch your fancy:

Finally: here are some life lessons one could take from the Noah’s Ark story; after you read the biblical narrative, pick which lesson is meant especially for you.

  • Plan ahead. It wasn’t raining when Noah built the Ark.
  • Stay fit. When you’re 600 years old, someone may ask you to do something really big.
  • Build your future on high ground.
  • For safety’s sake, travel in pairs.
  • Speed isn’t always an advantage; the snails were on board with the cheetahs.
  • Remember, the Ark was built by amateurs; the Titanic, by professionals.
  • No matter the storm, when you are with God, there’s always a rainbow waiting.
  • You might be a righteous person, but someone still has to shovel the poop.
  • Remember: We’re all in the same boat.

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