How does one spell “Jewish Wedding Canopy”?

The people Ethan would playfully refer to as “punks” would say “J-E-W-I-S-H…” but that’s not what we’re talking about here.

One thing we noticed while on our whirlwind trip through Phoenix last week, talking to florists, planners, event location managers, caterers, and other sundry people involved in The Wedding Day, was that we just couldn’t come to agreement on how to spell Huppah.  There are just so many choices, Chuppah, Hupah, Huppah, Huppa, Chuppa….  Though some would probably argue that there is only one right way to do it, they better not be using the Roman alphabet.  Because there just isn’t standardization in transliteration.  Oh sure, some people have tried, and large groups of Jews choose to use one standard or another, but there just isn’t a universal.

This can cause a bit of a problem when dealing with people not familiar with all the variance.  If you use a spelling they’re not used to, then they might not understand what you’re talking about.  Certainly this problem is more prevalent in the modern age when so much is done via email and the internet, but trying to make arrangements from 2000 miles away doesn’t help either.

Fortunately we haven’t run into any major snafus because of the joys of transliteration, but there has been occasional minor confusion.

All that being said, we’re happy to report success in making major progress from our trip, and invitations are going out tomorrow.

On a related note, when we drafted our invitations we had included the Hebrew date, and had spelled out the English year “Two thousand and eleven,” as is often traditional in formal invitations.  We had kept the Hebrew date as a numeral and got a near universal reaction from people who reviewed it that that looked weird.  In the end we chose uniformity in numerals because spelling out “Fifty seven and seventy one” in addition to the above just took up way too much space.  So be on the lookout and keep it in mind for your big day.  It’s a minor detail, but one worth looking good.

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One thought on “How does one spell “Jewish Wedding Canopy”?

  1. Hi Mia,
    When is your wedding?  I just saw your post on the spelling of the word Chuppah.  Too funny and very true!  I see you’re getting married in Phoenix.  I just saw the most amazing wedding video from another Jewish wedding in PHX.  I honestly think it is the most beautiful wedding video I’ve ever seen–and that’s saying something since I was a wedding planner forever.  Anyway, although it was an Orthodox wedding you should definitely watch it and see if there are any traditions you would want to include in your wedding ceremony.  Plus, it’s really pretty!

    http://weddingvideoolympia.com/beautifu … grapher-2/

    I’d love for you to share your wedding planning journey with my blog readers.  It’s so much more entertaining than just hearing from me all the time.  (It’s a new career for me having just gotten married this past November–also in a city where I didn’t live!)  

    If you’re interested in “chatting” and sharing tales email me at atxmichele@themodernjewishwedding.com

    Best,
    Michele

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