Thanksgivukkah

 

Dana here. Even though Thanksgivukkah has come and gone, I thought I would write about how we, as an interfaith couple, celebrated. Thanksgiving has been a tricky holiday for us. Chris’ family always does Thanksgiving at his parents’ home with a morning football game and other traditions while my family tends to switch it up each year, sometimes hosting or going to another relative’s home. Up until this year we had never spent Thanksgiving together but as it was our first Thanksgiving as an engaged couple we decided we would be with Chris’ family this year and with mine next year.

However, Hannukah threw a wrench into those plans and we were back to the drawing board. We knew we wanted to spend some time with my parents and celebrate Hannukah and we also wanted to be with Chris’ family for Thanksgiving. So, how did we make it work? We joined! Chris’ parents suggested that me and my parents come up and spend Thanksgiving with their family. Some couples may have been apprehensive about this arrangement but our parents get along great and have spent a lot of time (and consumed a few bottles of wine or scotch) together in the past few years.

Chris's turkey Menorah next to our family Menorah

From the very beginning Chris’ family asked how we could incorporate Hannukah into their Thanksgiving celebration. My parents brought up their Menorah and Chris, in fact, bought some clay and built a Menurky and a dreidal. When Chris and I arrived Wednesday evening the house was decorated in blue and white and geilt was scattered around the table. I was so touched! We gave a bit of background about the holiday, we sang a few songs, lit the candles and exchanged some gifts. We did the same, with much fuller bellies, on Thursday night after Thanksgiving. Chris’ family had lot of questions, which we answered as best we could, and they participated in lighting the candles. It was a really special few days that both of our families shared.

Chris and I are very lucky. We have two wonderful and very accepting families and realize that not all interfaith couples are as fortunate as we are. But it was truly magical to have both families coming together to share in this year’s unique holiday celebration. We challenge any other couples in 78,000 years to celebrate Thanksgivukkah in such style!