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Shabbat Made Easy

Shabbat
Available in on-screen reading friendly (PDF) and printer-friendly, downloadable (PDF) versions.

For more booklets, visit our Booklets for People in Interfaith Relationships page.

Did you know there is one Jewish holiday whose importance exceeds all the rest?

If you are thinking that it is Passover, guess again. Yes, Passover is important and we are commanded to remember the exodus from Egypt every day, which reminds us that we were once slaves and so should be empathetic to all who are in current states of slavery.

If you are thinking it is Yom Kippur, you have been tricked again. Yes, Yom Kippur is important. Together with Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur bookends the “Days of Awe” when we spend ten days examining our behavior and looking for ways to be a better person and a better Jew.

Here is a hint... The most important Jewish holiday comes every week! Yep, it is Shabbat or the Sabbath. One day a week, in imitation of God who rested on the seventh day of creation, we rest from our work.

To help you bring the gift of the Sabbath in to every home, InterfaithFamily.com brings you Shabbat Made Easy.

This little booklet is a guide through the why and how of bringing Shabbat to your home and table. It includes all the blessings traditionally said in the table service with candles, wine and the braided bread called challah. This booklet can be the script for both Jewish and interfaith families who are ready to “build a cathedral in time,” as Abraham Joshua Heschel said.

This handy guide to Shabbat can also be used:

  • as the foundation for a class on Shabbat for family education;
  • as a handout for new synagogue or community members;
  • to help interfaith families — and all families — who need a refresher on the Shabbat table service;
  • as a handout for religious schools, community Shabbat gatherings and tot Shabbats.

 

Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple." A bread that comes in a few different varieties; its most common variation is a braided egg bread, though there are water challahs that don't have eggs, and there are whole-wheat challahs which sometimes also don't have eggs. It is customary to being Sabbath and holiday meals by saying blessings and eating challah.
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