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Sukkot and Simchat Torah

Sukkot and Simchat Torah and some of the less well-known holidays — Shavuot, Tu Bishvat, Purim — can be great ways to introduce people to the beauty of Judaism. Learn how to make these other holidays part of your life as an intermarried couple or with your extended interfaith family in InterfaithFamily.com's archive of articles, resources and external links. Visit the Resource Page for Shabbat and Other Holidays, or chose a holiday below!

Sukkot and Simchat Torah are two autumn holidays that offer great ways to introduce people to the beauty of Judaism. Sukkot is like a Jewish Thanksgiving, complete with opportunities for dining and sleeping under the stars. Simchat Torah celebrates the annual cycle of reading the Torah, filled with joyous celebrations.

Upcoming Dates

  • Sukkot starts the evening of September 18, 2013; October 8, 2014; September 27, 2015.
  • Simchat Torah starts the evening of September 25, 2013 (September 26 if Shemini Atzeret is observed); October 15, 2014 (October 16 if Shemini Atzeret is observed); October 4, 2015 (October 5 if Shemini Atzeret is observed).
     
 Booklet
 
 Kids
      
 Video

   
     
 Blessings

Quick, easy downloads to guide you through the at-home rituals for the holidays, complete with audio of each blessing.

   
 Quick Reference
   
  In Your Community
  • Look for holiday events near you or find a new community to join for the holidays!
 
     
 Further reading
   
 Keep Talking

Looking to share Sukkot and Simchat Torah ideas and stories with others?

     
 Additional Resources
      

 

Hebrew for "Joy of Torah," a fall holiday that celebrates the completion of the yearlong Torah cycle and the commencement of a new one. Hebrew for "15th of [the month of] Shevat," both a date and the name of a holiday celebrated on that date. A holiday that falls in January or February, it's the New Year for trees. The Jewish Sabbath, from sunset on Friday to nightfall on Saturday. A Summer holiday commemorating the receiving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, it is also known as the Feast of Weeks, as it comes seven weeks after Passover begins. Hebrew for "Booths," it's a fall holiday marking the harvest, like a Jewish Thanksgiving, complete with opportunities for dining and sleeping under the stars. Hebrew word for a yellow citron, used ritually in the holiday of Sukkot. Hebrew for "lots," referring to the lots cast by Haman, the story's antagonist, to determine the date on which to kill the Jewish people. It's a spring holiday commemorating the Jewish people's triumph. The story is told through the biblical Book of Esther; the namesake heroine, a Jewish woman, marries the Persian king. Their interfaith relationship is central to the story.
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