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May 7, 2013 eNewsletter - Boston

 
InterfaithFamily
May 7, 2013
Dear Friends,
For nearly three years, I've gotten to know this community through the articles you've shared, the discussions you've started, the questions you've asked via our social media channels, and these bi-weekly eNewsletters. So it's bittersweet that I share the news that Friday was my last day at InterfaithFamily; I've chosen to pursue another opportunity in the Jewish community.

Thank you for opening up to me, sharing your stories with me — and all of InterfaithFamily by extension. I've learned a great deal from you all.
Shavuot
Looking for information about Shavuot, the holiday that starts the evening of May 14? Our booklet covers the history, custom, and basics, and don't forget to check out our favorite holiday recipes.

Food for Shavuot tends to be full of dairy, dairy, and more dairy. But Linda Morel shares four recipes from different Jewish communities that will change up your holiday menu, including a Sephardi recipe for stuffed artichokes. Plus, advice from Rabbi Gil Marks about meaningful activities for celebrating Shavuot, including surrounding yourself with nature; eating grains, fruits, and dairy meals; and discussing the meaning of freedom on this holiday when God gave the Ten Commandments. Read more in Delicious Recipes to Enhance Your Shavuot Celebration.

As we read and honor Ruth's journey at Shavuot, Rabbi Geela Rayzel Raphael reminds us that we can reflect and honor our own unique paths. Celebrate your marriages, honor the wisdom of your ancestors, and give gratitude for your abundance. Read more in The Book of Ruth: an Interfaith Tale.
Intermarriage
New to an interfaith relationship? Or maybe there's a new interfaith relationship in your family? Do you have questions about how to make it work? We're here to help. Check out the lists of 10 most common questions that we hear from partners in interfaith relationships — and let us know if you have more to add in the comments. Read more in 10 Questions Jewish Partners in Interfaith Couples Ask and 10 Questions Non-Jewish Partners in Interfaith Couples Ask.
Babies
Are you familiar with Jewish baby-naming customs? Amanda Koppelman Milstein explains them while sharing how she and her husband chose their baby's name. Read more in Naming William.
Animated Weekly Stories
Learning about the first "blasphemer," who was the son of an Israelite moth and an Egyptian father — why was his parent's intermarriage of relevance? What does it mean to blaspheme? Could someone actually blaspheme today? What would he or she have to do to be considered a blasphemer? Read (and watch) more in Say, What?
Blogs
Ed Case and Ari Moffic were in Washington, DC recently, participating in a community conversation about welcoming interfaith families. See what they have to say! Read more in Congratulations Washington and Being Part of a Community Conversation.

Move aside Santa, leprechauns, and the tooth fairy — there are Jewish elves to find! Didn't think Judaism fairy tales? On the Parenting Blog, Sarah R. discusses the stretelech, Yiddish for "magical little people," that live in her family's backyard. Read more in Meet the Stretelech.

Ed Case writes in eJewishPhilanthropy that it's "wonderful to see the attention that Jewish philanthropists are giving to inclusion of Jews with disabilities and LGBT Jews," but… Read more in Are Interfaith Families Included in Inclusive Philanthropy?

Wendy Armon writes about insider ("us") language in Jewish prayer, and wonders how this can become more inclusive for parents from different faith backgrounds who are raising Jewish kids — especially when it comes time to saying blessings at their children's bar or bat mitzvahs. Read more in The Blessing of the Parents.
Pop Culture
In this week's column, Nate Bloom looks at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, the revised view of beauty in People, and more! Read more in Interfaith Celebrities.
Stay in touch! And stay tuned for an announcement about the incoming Managing Editor.
Sincerely,
Benjamin Maron,
Former Director of Content and Educational Resources
 Shavuot
 Intermarriage
 Babies
 Animated Weekly Stories
 Blogs
 Pop Culture
 Featured Organization
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Featured Organization
from Our Network

Temple Emeth of Chestnut Hill is a youthful, spirited, and participatory Conservative synagogue that welcome families of varied backgrounds, including interfaith families. Check out their website's interfaith family page, with some familiar links!
 
 
Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple." Plural form of the Hebrew word "mitzvah" which means "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!") Having Jewish family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa. The term literally means "Spanish" in Hebrew. A Summer holiday commemorating the receiving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, it is also known as the Feast of Weeks, as it comes seven weeks after Passover begins. A language, literally meaning "Jewish," once widely used by Ashkenazi communities. It is influenced by German, Hebrew and Slavic languages, and is written with the Hebrew alphabet. It is comparable to the language of many Sephardi communities, Ladino. A member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer. ("Hazzan" in Hebrew.) Hebrew for "my master," the term refers to a spiritual leader and teacher of Torah. Often, but not always, a rabbi is the leader of a synagogue congregation.
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