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October 9, 2007 eNewsletter

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Connections In Your Area--Featured Events

 

 

Oct. 9, 2007

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Dear friend, 

The in-laws. The name conjures up images of overbearing, meddlesome interlopers who question your every decision, disapprove of your choices and ignore your opinions. Most in-laws aren't like that, but there is still a natural tension between the parents of a child and the husband or wife who now has first claim on their child's heart. In the new issue of our Web Magazine  on Extended Family Relationships, we hear perspectives from men and women about their in-laws, as well as from the in-laws themselves.

Sometimes the nightmare vision of in-laws is reality. Once Laurie Biundo and her husband told his parents they were getting married, it was like she didn't exist. Read Memoirs of an Invisible Woman .

Edie Mueller, the mother of a Jewish woman married to a non-Jew, wonders Can Stereotypes Be Helpful?

For years, Dan Pine tried to fit in with his wife's born-again Christian family. Read more in When Being Yourself Is Not All in the Family.

Also in this section:

Kaddish at St. Joseph's - by Julie Wiener


Humor

 

Eli Valley dissects an interfaith relationship from the era when sideburns were long, pants were tight and lamps were powered by lava. Read more in When Jewish David Met Irish Eileen: Intermarriage, '70s-Style .


Resource Pages

For more on Extended Family Relationships, see our Marriage and Relationships Resource Page , with links to relevant articles, discussion boards, issues of the Web Magazine and more.


Arts and Entertainment

In the latest installment of Interfaith Celebrities , Nate Bloom gives a play-by-play on Jews in the NFL, and discusses "K-ville" star Cole Hauser's impressive interfaith pedigree.

Also in this section:

Eytan Fox Pops Tel Aviv's Bubble - Review of The Bubble and interview with director Eytan Fox

Love in the Time of Depression - Review of Pete Hammil's North River

 


What's New on the Blogs

On the IFF Network Blog, we write about a rabbi who longs to sit by the Christmas tree and the real reason for intermarriage: Jews have no sense of direction.


Last year's Slingshot.

What's New at IFF

For the third consecutive year, InterfaithFamily.com has been named one of North America's most innovative Jewish non-profits in Slingshot , an annual guidebook published by a division of The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies. This year, for the first time, a group of young philanthropists started a Slingshot Fund. Of the 50 organizations included in Slingshot , InterfaithFamily.com is one of only eight receiving an inaugural grant! For more information, click here .


Coming Next

On Oct. 21, we are launching a completely redesigned website. Instead of a biweekly Web Magazine, we will publish new articles on a daily basis.

Don't worry, though, if you are subscribed to our e-newsletter, you will continue to receive biweekly updates of what's new at InterfaithFamily.com. 

Sincerely,

Micah Sachs, Managing Editor

Write for Us!

We're looking for writers on the following topics:

  • Interfaith families and Halloween
  • Your interfaith love story for Valentine's Day
  • Interfaith families and New Year's
  • Interfaith families and Thanksgiving
  • Baby ceremonies
  • Weddings

Interested in any of these topics? Contact Web Magazine Editor Ronnie Friedland at editor@interfaithfamily.com .

 

InterfaithFamily.com | P.O. Box 428, Newton, MA 02464 | 617 581 6860 | network@interfaithfamily.com

A member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer. ("Hazzan" in Hebrew.) Hebrew for "my master," the term refers to a spiritual leader and teacher of Torah. Often, but not always, a rabbi is the leader of a synagogue congregation.
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