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September 4, 2012 eNewsletter - Boston

 
InterFaithFamily
September 4, 2012
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Dear Friends,
September is here, school's in session, and there's no denying it: the Jewish High Holy Days (Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur) are rapidly approaching! For tips, recipes, advice videos, explanations and more, keep reading...
High Holy Days
The Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, is less than two weeks away — starting the evening of September 16th. Looking for a refresher? Wondering why Yom Kippur follows, September 25th at sundown? Our Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur Resource Page is a great roundup of booklets (free to download and print), guides, recipes, blessings, articles, discussion boards and more.

What's that noise during Rosh Hashanah services? For many people, the shofar blasts are the highlight of the Rosh Hashanah synagogue services. Similar to fireworks set off on New Year's Eve, or banging on pots and blowing noisemakers at the stroke of midnight as we enter January 1st, the shofar blasts grab our attention, shouting, "wake up! The New Year is here!" Read (and watch) more in Shofar: New Year's Wake-Up Call.

Ignore your parents' advice, and play with your food this Rosh Hashanah! Borrow traditions from around the world and incorporate customs from extended family as you create a seder (festive meal), a great way to bring your extended interfaith family to the table this holiday. Learn more about this easy to adapt ancient custom in our book review of Apples and Pomegranates: A Family Seder for Rosh Hashanah. Read more in A Family Seder for Rosh Hashanah.

Whether going to synagogue or celebrating with meals at home, we have tips for helping your interfaith family get the most out of the Jewish holidays this September. Do you have tips to add? Share them in the comments! Read more in Six Tips For Interfaith Families Facing the High Holidays.
Parenting
Andrea Piegey wrote about her daughters' experience at a camp in Italy — unique as "Italian-American, bilingual Jewish kids who happen to be vegetarian" — and how the staff handled diversity, inclusion, and arranged to let her kids celebrate Shabbat. Read more in Celebrating Shabbat at an Italian Summer Camp.
Blog
As Jewish educators and professionals, how do we respond to tricky comments? When a child says that they're "half Jewish," how do we respond? On the blog, Rabbi Ari Moffic shares her approach for the classroom. Read more in What Can I Say?

Education, explicit welcome, engagement, all need to be more than just lip service. Ed Case takes a crack at the big Jewish Community Study of New York, released in June. What can we learn about intermarried couples? Interfaith families? Read more in Insights on Engaging Interfaith Families from the NY Community Study.
Pop Culture
Nate Bloom offers a look at the television shows starting this September in prime time, the romance of Jason Segel and Michelle Williams and an update on John Mayer and Katy Perry. Read more in Interfaith Celebrities.
Are you, or is a family member, Hindu, Muslim, Quaker, Buddhist or of another religion/faith with an interesting story to share about a ritual, spring holiday or life-cycle event with your interfaith family or interfaith relationship? I'd love to hear your story pitches! Contact me!
Shanah tovah — happy New Year,
Benjamin Maron,
Managing Editor
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High Holy Days
Parenting
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Hebrew for "Head of the Year," the Jewish New Year. With Yom Kippur, known as the High Holy Days. Hebrew for "a good year," a typical greeting on Rosh Hashanah. Hebrew for "Day of Atonement," the final of ten Days of Awe that begin with Rosh Hashanah. Occurs during the fall and is marked by a 24-hour fast. One of the most important Jewish holidays. Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple." The Jewish Sabbath, from sunset on Friday to nightfall on Saturday. A member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer. ("Hazzan" in Hebrew.) Simple musical instrument made from a ram's horn that is blown in synagogue on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, as well as each morning after daily services during the Hebrew month of Elul (the month leading up to Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). Hebrew for "my master," the term refers to a spiritual leader and teacher of Torah. Often, but not always, a rabbi is the leader of a synagogue congregation. Hebrew for "order," refers to the traditional course of events, or service, surrounding the Passover and Tu Bishvat meals.
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