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eNewsletter 8/14/07

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Ways You Can Get Involved

We want to know: Is making your partner happy a sufficient reason to convert to Judaism?


Looking for a rabbi for your interfaith wedding? We have a database of more than 100 rabbis throughout the U.S. and Canada.


If what we do helps you or others you care about, please make a tax-deductible charitable contribution in support of our work.


Connections In Your Area--Featured Events

Not sure how to raise Jewish kids?

Try the Mother's Circle, a support group for women of another religion who are raising Jewish children, at the Dayton, Ohio, Jewish Community Center. The next meeting is Aug. 26.

PLEASE BE AWARE: InterfaithFamily.com will be down from 12 a.m. EST (9 p.m. PST) on Saturday, Aug. 18, to 7 a.m. EST (10 a.m. EST) on Sunday, Aug. 19, for data maintenance.


August 14, 2007

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Dear {{DYNAMIC MERGE}},

At InterfaithFamily.com we've often been accused of being against non-Jewish partners converting. But it's not that we're against conversion, we're just against it when it's for the wrong reasons. Judaism has much to offer the potential convert, but abandoning the faith tradition of your parents and adopting a new set of beliefs and rituals is a profound personal choice. It shouldn't be made out of a desire to please somebody's parents or to assuage somebody's guilt. In the new issue of our Web Magazine on conversion, we hear from those who have--and those who haven't--decided to convert.

After nine years as a Jew-by-choice, Gina Hagler still has trouble with Those Hard-to-Grasp Nuances of Judaism. "You can spot me right away," she says. "I'm the one blurting out, 'Congratulations!,' when everyone around me is yelling, 'Mazel tov!'"

Danielle Freni has an Irish skin tone, a Sicilian nose and an Italian last name--can this convert-to-be ever fit in in the synagogue? Read more in Do I Look Jewish?

Does raising your kids Jewish mean you have to be Jewish too, wonders Kim Tornberg, in Why I Am Not Converting.

Also in this section:

The Late Blooomer

A Spark from Sinai

Gay-by-Birth, Jews-by-Choice

News

Jean-Marie Lustiger was born a Jew and became a highly ranked cardinal. Was he a righteous gentile--or a traitor to his people? Read more .

Also in this section:

Unique Obstacles for Patrilineal Converts

Resource Pages

For more on conversion, see our Conversion Resource Page , with links to relevant articles, discussion boards, issues of the Web Magazine and more!


Arts and Entertainment

Chelsea Clinton goes to Shabbat dinner, Winona Ryder makes a comeback and the two Coreys are back--for better or worse. Read more in the latest installment of Interfaith Celebrities .

Also in this section:

Battle of the Dolls: Barbie vs. The Bratz

Singing the Jewish Gospel: A Profile of Mare Winningham

Three Stars for the Ten

Goya's Ghosts: The Politics of Portraiture

Can This Romance Last? New York's Upper West Side Meets Paris' West Bank

What's New on the Blogs

On the IFF Network Blog, we reflected on a controversial proposal that the Jewish community encourage single women in their 30s and 40s to interdate and the ongoing Noah Feldman controversy .


Coming Next

Our next issue, on Parenting, will be published on Aug. 28.

Sincerely,

Micah Sachs, Online Managing Editor

Write for Us!

We're looking for writers on the following topics:

  • Interdating
  • December holidays
  • Weddings
  • Babies
  • Relationship Issues

Interested in any of these topics? Contact Web Magazine Editor Ronnie Friedland at editor@interfaithfamily.com .

InterfaithFamily.com | P.O. Box 428, Newton, MA 02464 | 617 581 6860 | network@interfaithfamily.com

Hebrew and Yiddish for "good luck," a phrase used to express congratulations for happy and significant occasions. Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple." The Jewish Sabbath, from sunset on Friday to nightfall on Saturday. Hebrew for "my master," the term refers to a spiritual leader and teacher of Torah. Often, but not always, a rabbi is the leader of a synagogue congregation.
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