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Featured Events and Organizations from Our Network

Celebrate the diversity of Jewish life

 Hudson river valley

January 15-18, 2010.

It's not too late to register for Limmud NY at the Hudson Valley Resort. Choose from 300+ sessions, including text study, art, music, film, yoga, nature walks, kids' camp, a variety of Shabbat services and more. Or just hang out, relax, eat, meet new friends and grow your Jewish world.



 




January 6, 2010

Dear Friend,

Happy New Year! Hope you all had some pleasant days off. The difference between the secular New Year and the Jewish New Year is that at Rosh Hashanah, my entire family doesn't spend the week hanging around the house in our pajamas. Now all of us at InterfaithFamily.com are back to work with a sense of purpose and some surprisingly meaty content from the last two weeks.


nautilus shell in cross sectionInterfaith Families and the Jewish Community

After Juliet Stamperdahl wrote about her interfaith wedding for IFF last October, readers wanted to know how her Modern Orthodox community responded. The answer is, It's Complicated.

Are interfaith families outside the Jewish community? Perhaps there are certain words we shouldn't use--No More Outreach?

artichoke

Multiracial and Multicultural Jewish Families

A thoughtful piece in Newsweek on the future of race in the United States prompted a reflection on Race and the Future of Jewishness. Perhaps in the near future it will be increasingly normal to be a person of mixed heritage, and more people will be able to relate to the desire to preserve more than one culture.

We also considered how Jewish food might be affected by interfaith families--including the revival of old food ways--in Cooking Up New Traditions. (If you're interested in Sephardi recipes, we have some recommendations!)

tax formsDeath and Mourning

Taxes--some people are working on them right now, and you know how stressful that is. There's something else you need to discuss, if you're in an interfaith family, because it presents even greater challenges. Take a look at our discussion packet of articles with values clarification questions, Talking about Death and Mourning.

taking the plungeConversion

One subject many readers ask about on InterfaithFamily.com is conversion to Judaism. We've created A Resource Guide to Jewish Conversion, with information about all the Jewish movements and answers to questions people in interfaith families might have.

Step Into Shabbat album coverShabbat

Mimi DuPree's children loved Julie Geller's new CD, Step Into Shabbat; in A Musical Invitation to Shabbat Peace.


John Mayer in concert photoArts and Entertainment

Singer John Mayer has said being on Twitter is just like dating. That's why it was on Twitter that Mayer revealed he's Jewish and from an interfaith family. That story, and the Golden Globes nominees from Jewish and interfaith backgrounds, inInterfaith Celebrities: John Mayer Loves His Fans.

Come join our Network to get a feed of the articles that interest you most--and events in your area, too.

Sincerely,

Ruth Abrams, Managing Editor

 

Write for Us!

We're looking for writers on the following topics:

  • Passover in an interfaith family
  • Easter dinner in my family
  • Interfaith family Passover recipes
  • Getting along with my in-laws
  • What I learned from the Hebrew school car pool
  • Adult children of interfaith marriage getting married
  • Parenting disagreements with religion in the mix

InterfaithFamily.com | P.O. Box 428, Newton, MA 02464 | 617 581 6860 |

 

Hebrew for "Head of the Year," the Jewish New Year. With Yom Kippur, known as the High Holy Days. The spring holiday commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from slavery in Egypt. The Hebrew name is "Pesach." Having Jewish family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa. The term literally means "Spanish" in Hebrew. A language of West Semitic origins, culturally considered to be the language of the Jewish people. Ancient or Classical Hebrew is the language of Jewish prayer or study. Modern Hebrew was developed in the late-19th and early 20th centuries as a revival language; today it is spoken by most Israelis.
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