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September 14, 2010 eNewsletter

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Featured Events and Organizations from Our Network

"Gathering the Waters" Mikveh Conference



This conference, hosted by Mayyim Hayyim of Newton, Mass., will include text study and skills workshops on running a community mikvah. It takes place Oct. 10-12 in Boston.

 




September 14, 2010

Dear friend,

Shana tova! Happy new year! When I go to High Holiday services, I'm reminded of how the essence of Judaism is community. The comfort and support of friendship, the challenge of debate, the holiness of shared religious practice--Judaism is simply unimaginable without community.

This new year, I'd like to share with you a few opportunities to influence the Jewish community.

For the first time ever, we are hosting an interactive online discussion group that can help you, or someone you know, work through issues in an interfaith relationship. Love and Religion, facilitated by Dr. Marion Usher of the Washington DC Jewish Community Center, is a four-session workshop where interfaith couples can explore how to have a religious life together. The class starts Oct. 20 and costs $100 per couple. To learn more about the class and to register, click here.

In November, I will be speaking at the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations of North America on the issue of whether the Jewish community can encourage inmarriage and welcome interfaith families at the same time. I would love to hear your feedback, so I can incorporate your opinions and stories into my presentation.

Finally, time is running out on the chance to vote for me as a Jewish Community Hero. If I am selected as one of five winners, InterfaithFamily.com will get a grant to continue its important work, and I will be recognized at the General Assembly. The top 20 vote-getters are judged by a panel that selects the winners. I'm in 15th place now, so your vote really matters. You can vote every 12 hours--and please ask your friends on Facebook to vote too!


weddingYom Kippur

Feeling trepidation about going to a large synagogue service where you won’t know anybody? Anxious that your life hasn’t progressed as you hoped? You’re not alone. Leonard Felder offers some advice if you’re Feeling Like an Outsider at the High Holidays.

Synagogues are not the only place where you can take part in services. An innovative JCC in Florida has hired a rabbi to host High Holiday services, although it's not without controversy.

For more on the upcoming holiday, see our Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur page.


Break the Fast Recipes

Sheilah Kaufman shares classic recipes for a delicious break-fast: noodle kugel, hallah, apple cake and cheese fingers. Just try not to think about them too much before Yom Kippur’s over.

Looking for other Yom Kippur recipes? Check out our High Holidays Recipes index.


Change is Afoot

As Jewish communities change, practices that were forbidden in the recent past--like getting Jewish-themed tattoos, or having Jewish weddings on Saturday before sunset--are being performed with a deep sense of Jewish commitment.

As Rabbi Noa Kushner (the daughter of our own Karen Kusher) says, there's a new generation stepping forward, one that needs to figure out how to "do Jewish stuff" on its own terms.


Celebrities

Dirty Dancing is perhaps the most popular interfaith love story of all time, and yet the movie never mentions Baby’s or Johnny’s religion. What gives? Read more in Nate Bloom’s Interfaith Celebrities: Jennifer Grey Dances Again, "Stuff" His Dad Says.


If you are fasting this Yom Kippur, I wish you a meaningful one.

Sincerely,

Edmund Case, CEO

 

 

InterfaithFamily.com | P.O. Box 428, Newton, MA 02464 | 617 581 6860 |

 

Hebrew for "a good year," a typical greeting on Rosh Hashanah. Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple." Hebrew for "collection," referring to the "collection of water," is a bath used for the purpose of ritual immersion in Judaism. Today it is used as part of the traditional procedure for converting to Judaism, by Jews who follow the laws of ritual (body) purity, and sometimes for making kitchen utensils kosher. Hebrew for "collection," referring to the "collection of water," is a bath used for the purpose of ritual immersion in Judaism. Today it is used as part of the traditional procedure for converting to Judaism, by Jews who follow the laws of ritual (body) purity, and sometimes for making kitchen utensils kosher. Hebrew for "my master," the term refers to a spiritual leader and teacher of Torah. Often, but not always, a rabbi is the leader of a synagogue congregation.
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