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From The LGBTQ Archives: Holidays

Some of our favorite articles from the LGBTQ archive about the holidays:

  • Interfaith Seder: a personal narrative about the successful interfaith Passover seder that the author, Lyssa Friedman, and her partner threw.
  • Call Me Old Fashioned, But...: Framed against annual Yom Kippur observances, this personal narrative, by the non-Jewish partner of a rabbi, describes his experiences in synagogue and his thoughts about the obligations of his unique relationship.
  • Canceling Christmas: Before, Christmas had been entirely self-indulgent, an orgy of good tidings and cheer that Joanna Hammer;s Jewish partner had lovingly enabled. Suddenly, with a new son in their lives, everything changed.
  • My First Purim: a great read from a non-Jewish partner's perspective on finding community and celebrating a less-known holiday.

 

And while not exclusively related to the holidays, it's hard to think of the Jewish holidays without food:

  • A Good Eater: "One doesn't really run into Jewish folks too often growing up in rural Indiana; one certainly doesn't get an idea of the ins and outs of Jewish culture or food."
  • All Who Are Hungry, Come And Eat: a non-Jewish partner relates to her in-laws as she learns how to make food for the Jewish holidays.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hebrew for "Day of Atonement," the final of ten Days of Awe that begin with Rosh Hashanah. Occurs during the fall and is marked by a 24-hour fast. One of the most important Jewish holidays. Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple." Hebrew for "my master," the term refers to a spiritual leader and teacher of Torah. Often, but not always, a rabbi is the leader of a synagogue congregation.
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