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FoodFest: Sukkot Takes the Cake (And Eats It, too)

September 20, 2013

By Dan Brosgol

There’s an acorn squash on my countertop.

There’s canned pumpkin in the cupboard.

I’ve got a half-bushel of apples next to the microwave.

And there’s a big turkey in the freezer.

Yup yup, it’s fall Sukkot.

Don’t be fooled by those who tell you that Passover is the ultimate holiday for eating, or that Rosh Hashanah dinners are huge endeavors. Sukkot takes the cake (and eats it, too), as THE Jewish food holiday, as we are supposed to eat all possible meals outside in our temporary dwellings.

So for those of you looking for inspiration for Sukkot food, try this one for a sample daily menu:

Breakfast:

Pumpkin pancakes with maple syrup

Pumpkin spice coffee

Fresh cider

Lunch:

Green salad with pomegranate seeds

Matzah Ball soup

Fall bagel selection (pumpkin pie, apple/cranberry, cinnamon raisin)

Snack:

Apple muffins

Dinner:

A big old roasted turkey

Sweet potatoes

Cranberry sauce (more on this for Thanksgivukkah)

Stuffed acorn squash

Spiked cider

You’ve got eight days to plan your Sukkot deliciousness, so feel free to work in some lentil soup, grilled veggies, crock pot brisket, shakshuka, peach cobbler, homemade bread, and more. Luckily I’ve got a few days off for the holidays so I’ll have time to experiment.

Chag sameach, and happy eating.

Reprinted with permission from JewishBoston.com

Hebrew for "Head of the Year," the Jewish New Year. With Yom Kippur, known as the High Holy Days. Hebrew for "happy holiday." The spring holiday commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from slavery in Egypt. The Hebrew name is "Pesach." Hebrew word for an unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during the holiday of Passover.
Jewish Boston

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