Glossary

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  • B’nai mitzva

    Hebrew plural of "bar mitzvah" or "bat mitzvah." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish children come of age at 13. When a child comes of age, he or she is officially a bar mitzvah ("son of the commandments") or bat mitzvah ("daughter of the commandments") and considered an adult. The terms are commonly used as a short-hand for the bar/bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration.
  • B’nai mitzvah

    Hebrew plural of "bar mitzvah" or "bat mitzvah." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish children come of age at 13. When a child comes of age, he or she is officially a bar mitzvah ("son of the commandments") or bat mitzvah ("daughter of the commandments") and considered an adult. The terms are commonly used as a short-hand for the bar/bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration.
  • B’racha

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • b’vakasha

    Hebrew for "please" and "you're welcome."
  • Bar Mitzva

    Hebrew for "son of the commandments." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish boys come of age at 13. When a boy comes of age, he is officially a bar mitzvah and considered an adult. The term is commonly used as a short-hand for the bar mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration. The female equivalent is "bat mitzvah."
  • Bar Mitzvah

    Hebrew for "son of the commandments." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish boys come of age at 13. When a boy comes of age, he is officially a bar mitzvah and considered an adult. The term is commonly used as a short-hand for the bar mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration. The female equivalent is "bat mitzvah."
  • baruch ata adonai

    Blessed are You, my God in Hebrew. Introductory words to many Jewish prayers.
  • Baruch atah Adonai

    "Blessed are You, my God" in Hebrew. Introductory words to many Jewish prayers.
  • baruch ha’ba’ah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a female).
  • Baruch Ha’bah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a male).
  • baruch haba’ah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a female).
  • baruch habaah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a female).
  • Baruch habah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a male).
  • baruchot ha’ba’ot

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one female).
  • baruchot ha’bahot

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one female).
  • baruchot habaot

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one female).
  • barukh ha’ba’ah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a female).
  • barukh ha’bah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a male).
  • barukh haba’ah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a female).
  • barukh habaah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a female).
  • barukh habah

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming a male).
  • barukhot ha’ba’ot

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one female).
  • barukhot ha’bahot

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one female).
  • barukhot habaot

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one female).
  • bas mitzvah

    Hebrew for "daughter of the commandments." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish girls come of age at 12 or 13. When a girl comes of age, she is officially a bat mitzvah and considered an adult. The term is commonly used as a short-hand for the bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration. The male equivalent is "bar mitzvah."
  • Bat mitzva

    Hebrew for "daughter of the commandments." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish girls come of age at 12 or 13. When a girl comes of age, she is officially a bat mitzvah and considered an adult. The term is commonly used as a short-hand for the bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration. The male equivalent is "bar mitzvah."
  • Bat mitzvah

    Hebrew for "daughter of the commandments." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish girls come of age at 12 or 13. When a girl comes of age, she is officially a bat mitzvah and considered an adult. The term is commonly used as a short-hand for the bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration. The male equivalent is "bar mitzvah."
  • beis din

    Rabbinic court involved in matters of Jewish law, including conversion and traditional divorce procedures.
  • Beit din

    Rabbinic court involved in matters of Jewish law, including conversion and traditional divorce procedures.
  • benching

    In Yiddish, "bentshn" means "to bless." It means "blessing" and refers to saying the blessing after meals, "Birkat Hamazon" (Hebrew for "Blessing on Nourishment").
  • bensching

    In Yiddish, "bentshn" means "to bless." It means "blessing" and refers to saying the blessing after meals, "Birkat Hamazon" (Hebrew for "Blessing on Nourishment").
  • beracha

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • berachot

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Berakhah

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • bima

    The elevated area or platform in a synagogue, from which Torah is read. Worship service leaders, such as clergy, may lead services from the bimah as well.
  • Bimah

    The elevated area or platform in a synagogue, from which Torah is read. Worship service leaders, such as clergy, may lead services from the bimah as well.
  • bircat erusin

    Engagement blessings, part of Jewish wedding service.
  • bircat nissuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • bircat nisuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • Birchot erusin

    Engagement blessings, part of Jewish wedding service.
  • Birchot nissuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • Birchot nisuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • birkas erusin

    Engagement blessings, part of Jewish wedding service.
  • birkas ha’mazon

    Hebrew for "Blessing on Nourishment," the blessing after meals.
  • birkas hamazon

    Hebrew for "Blessing on Nourishment," the blessing after meals.
  • birkas nisuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • birkat erusin

    Engagement blessings, part of Jewish wedding service.
  • birkat ha’mazon

    Hebrew for "Blessing on Nourishment," the blessing after meals.
  • birkat hamazon

    Hebrew for "Blessing on Nourishment," the blessing after meals.
  • birkat nisuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • birkot nissuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • birkot nisuin

    Hebrew for "the wedding blessings," also known as sheva brachot ("the seven blessings"), are blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • Birthright Israel

    An international program that sends thousands of young Jews to Israel each year for free.
  • blintze

    A thin crepe-like pancake that's fried, folded or wrapped around a fruit or cream cheese filling, and then fried again.
  • bnai mitzva

    Hebrew plural of "bar mitzvah" or "bat mitzvah." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish children come of age at 13. When a child comes of age, he or she is officially a bar mitzvah ("son of the commandments") or bat mitzvah ("daughter of the commandments") and considered an adult. The terms are commonly used as a short-hand for the bar/bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration.
  • bnai mitzvah

    Hebrew plural of "bar mitzvah" or "bat mitzvah." In modern Jewish practice, Jewish children come of age at 13. When a child comes of age, he or she is officially a bar mitzvah ("son of the commandments") or bat mitzvah ("daughter of the commandments") and considered an adult. The terms are commonly used as a short-hand for the bar/bat mitzvah's coming-of-age ceremony and/or celebration.
  • bracha

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Brachah

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • brachas

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Bracho

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Brachos

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • brachot

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • brakha

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Brakhah

    Hebrew for "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • brakhas

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Brakhos

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • brakhot

    Hebrew for the plural of "blessing" (and "bounty").
  • Bris

    Hebrew for "covenant," often referring to the ritual for Jewish boys when they are 8 days old ("brit milah" - "covenant of circumcision"). It is commonly known as "bris," which is the Ashkenazi or Yiddish pronunciation of "brit."
  • bris bas

    Hebrew for "daughter's covenant," a ceremony or ritual for welcoming baby girls into the Jewish community.
  • bris bat

    Hebrew for "daughter's covenant," a ceremony or ritual for welcoming baby girls into the Jewish community.
  • bris mila

    Hebrew for "covenant of circumcision," a ritual for Jewish boys when they are 8 days old. It is commonly known as "bris," which is the Ashkenazi or Yiddish pronunciation of "brit."
  • bris milah

    Hebrew for "covenant of circumcision," a ritual for Jewish boys when they are 8 days old. It is commonly known as "bris," which is the Ashkenazi or Yiddish pronunciation of "brit."
  • Brit

    Hebrew for "covenant," often referring to the ritual for Jewish boys when they are 8 days old ("brit milah" - "covenant of circumcision"). It is commonly known as "bris," which is the Ashkenazi or Yiddish pronunciation of "brit."
  • Brit bat

    Hebrew for "daughter's covenant," a ceremony or ritual for welcoming baby girls into the Jewish community.
  • brit mila

    Hebrew for "covenant of circumcision," a ritual for Jewish boys when they are 8 days old. It is commonly known as "bris," which is the Ashkenazi or Yiddish pronunciation of "brit."
  • Brit milah

    Hebrew for "covenant of circumcision," a ritual for Jewish boys when they are 8 days old. It is commonly known as "bris," which is the Ashkenazi or Yiddish pronunciation of "brit."
  • bruchim ha’ba’im

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one male or a group of males and females).
  • bruchim ha’baim

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one male or a group of males and females).
  • bruchim habaim

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one male or a group of males and females).
  • brukhim ha’ba’im

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one male or a group of males and females).
  • brukhim ha’baim

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one male or a group of males and females).
  • brukhim habaim

    Hebrew for "welcome" (when welcoming more than one male or a group of males and females).
  • Bubbe

    Yiddish for "grandmother."
  • bubbie

    Yiddish for "grandmother."
  • bubby

    Yiddish for "grandmother."