Glossary

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  • cantor

    A member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer. ("Hazzan" in Hebrew.)
  • Chag Sameach

    Hebrew for "happy holiday."
  • challah

    Braided bread made with eggs, over which the Shabbat and holidays.
  • challahs

    A bread that comes in a few different varieties; its most common variation is a braided egg bread, though there are water challahs that don't have eggs, and there are whole-wheat challahs which sometimes also don't have eggs. It is customary to being Sabbath and holiday meals by saying blessings and eating challah.
  • challe

    A bread that comes in a few different varieties; its most common variation is a braided egg bread, though there are water challahs that don't have eggs, and there are whole-wheat challahs which sometimes also don't have eggs. It is customary to being Sabbath and holiday meals by saying blessings and eating challah.
  • challeh

    A bread that comes in a few different varieties; its most common variation is a braided egg bread, though there are water challahs that don't have eggs, and there are whole-wheat challahs which sometimes also don't have eggs. It is customary to being Sabbath and holiday meals by saying blessings and eating challah.
  • challos

    A bread that comes in a few different varieties; its most common variation is a braided egg bread, though there are water challahs that don't have eggs, and there are whole-wheat challahs which sometimes also don't have eggs. It is customary to being Sabbath and holiday meals by saying blessings and eating challah.
  • Chametz

    Hebrew for "leavened," foods that are not kosher for Passover, such as bread and wheat-based products. It refers to products that are both made from one of five types of grain and have been combined with water and left to stand raw (rise) for longer than eighteen minutes.
  • Channukah

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Chanuka

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Chanukah

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Chanukkah

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • charoses

    Derived from the Hebrew word "cheres," which means clay, it's a mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine eaten as part of the Passover seder. Symbolizing the mortar that the Hebrew slaves used to build the cities for Pharaoh in Egypt, it's one of the symbolic food items on the seder plate.
  • Charoset

    Mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine, traditionally eaten during Passover. Symbolizes the mortar that the Hebrew slaves in Egypt used to build the Pharoah's pyramids.
  • chasid

    Hebrew for "pious," commonly refers to a member of an Orthodox Jewish mystic movement founded in the 18th century in Eastern Europe by Baal Shem Tov that reacted against Talmudic learning and maintained that God's presence was in all of one's surroundings and that one should serve God in one's every deed and word.
  • Chasidic

    Hebrew for "pious," commonly refers to a member of an Orthodox Jewish mystic movement founded in the 18th century in Eastern Europe by Baal Shem Tov that reacted against Talmudic learning and maintained that God's presence was in all of one's surroundings and that one should serve God in one's every deed and word.
  • Chazan

    Hebrew for "cantor," a member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer.
  • chazzan

    Hebrew for "cantor," a member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer.
  • chesed shel emes

    Hebrew for "true kindness," refers to burial of the dead.
  • chesed shel emet

    Hebrew for "true kindness," refers to burial of the dead.
  • chesped

    Hebrew for "eulogy."
  • Chol Ha’Moed

    Hebrew for "weekdays of the festival," refers to the intermediate days of Passover and Sukkot. For example, the first two days of Passover are a holiday, but the next days are not; on the first days, work is not permitted according to traditional Jewish law, but on the intermediate days work is permitted.
  • Chol HaMoed

    Hebrew for "weekdays of the festival," refers to the intermediate days of Passover and Sukkot. For example, the first two days of Passover are a holiday, but the next days are not; on the first days, work is not permitted according to traditional Jewish law, but on the intermediate days work is permitted.
  • Cholent

    From the Yiddish word "tsholnt," a stew that is brought to a boil before the Sabbath and then kept warm overnight to fully cook in time for Saturday's lunch. There are several different stories for the origin of the word, though most seem to connect it to Old French, "chalant" ("to warm") or "chaud lent" ("hot slow").
  • chometz

    Hebrew for "leavened," foods that are not kosher for Passover, such as bread and wheat-based products. It refers to products that are both made from one of five types of grain and have been combined with water and left to stand raw (rise) for longer than eighteen minutes.
  • chulent

    From the Yiddish word "tsholnt," a stew that is brought to a boil before the Sabbath and then kept warm overnight to fully cook in time for Saturday's lunch. There are several different stories for the origin of the word, though most seem to connect it to Old French, "chalant" ("to warm") or "chaud lent" ("hot slow").
  • chumetz

    Hebrew for "leavened," foods that are not kosher for Passover, such as bread and wheat-based products. It refers to products that are both made from one of five types of grain and have been combined with water and left to stand raw (rise) for longer than eighteen minutes.
  • chupah

    Hebrew for "canopy" or "covering," the structure (open on all four sides) under which a Jewish wedding ceremony takes place. In its simplest for, it consists of a cloth, sheet, or tallit stretched or supported over four poles.
  • chuppa

    A huppah--often spelled ?chuppah?--is a Jewish wedding canopy with four open sides. A Jewish wedding ceremony typically occurs under a huppah.
  • Chuppah

    Hebrew for "canopy" or "covering," the structure (open on all four sides) under which a Jewish wedding ceremony takes place. In its simplest for, it consists of a cloth, sheet, or tallit stretched or supported over four poles.
  • chutzpa

    A Yiddish word meaning audacity, for good or for bad; commonly used to imply something was gutsy. Derived from the Hebrew word for "insolence."
  • chutzpah

    A Yiddish word meaning audacity, for good or for bad; commonly used to imply something was gutsy. Derived from the Hebrew word for "insolence."
  • Communion

    In Christianity, when wine and a wafer, symbolic of the blood and body of Jesus Christ, are consumed.
  • confirmation

    In Judaism, this refers to a ceremony created by the Reform movement as a way for young adults to show their decision to embrace Jewish study and reaffirm their commitment to Judaism. Confirmation is typically held at the end of the tenth grade. In Christianity, confirmation is either considered a sacrament or a rite ceremonially performed in a church. In some denominations and churches, confirmation is understood as bestowing the Holy Spirit. In others it signifies entering adulthood. In still others, it results in church membership.
  • congregation

    People who attend and worship at a given synagogue.