Glossary

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  • G-d

    God. In traditional Jewish circles, it is forbidden to write or say God's full Hebrew name. This custom has carried over into English by some, who write "God" without the vowel (o) and replace it with a hyphen. Some use variations of this, such as G!d or G@d.
  • gabbai

    Is a Hebrew word, sometimes used interchangeably with the Hebrew word "shamash," used to describe a person who assists in the running of synagogue services in some way.
  • gefilte fish

    Yiddish for "stuffed fish," a patty made of ground up varieties of fish, matzo meal and spices, boiled in fish broth. A popular dish on Passover, sometimes served on Shabbat and other holidays as well.
  • Gelt

    Yiddish for "money," usually refers to chocolate coins given on Hanukkah (and used as bets during the dreidel game).
  • Goy

    Yiddish for "gentile," or someone who is not Jewish. Some use this term with affection, however it's still largely understood to have a derogatory connotation.
  • goyim

    Yiddish for "gentiles," or someone who is not Jewish. Some use this term with affection, however it's still largely understood to have a derogatory connotation.
  • Goys

    Yiddish for "gentiles," or someone who is not Jewish. Some use this term with affection, however it's still largely understood to have a derogatory connotation.
  • gut shabbes

    Yiddish for "good Sabbath," a customary greeting leading into, and during, the Sabbath.
  • gut shabbos

    Yiddish for "good Sabbath," a customary greeting leading into, and during, the Sabbath.
  • gut vokh

    Yiddish for "good week," a customary greeting on Saturday evenings after the Sabbath ends (when the new week begins).
  • Gut Yontif

    Yiddish for "happy holiday."