Glossary

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  • Ha’Motzi

    Hebrew for "brings forth" or "expels," the first unique or identifying word of the blessing over bread ("...brings forth bread from the earth"). Some say this blessing over bread, others recite it as a catch-all before a meal.
  • Ha’Shem

    Hebrew for "The Name." Used as a substitute for the Hebrew name for God, which religious Jews are forbidden from uttering outside of prayer. ("This lovely dinner was provided by HaShem - and the Goldsteins!" or "If, HaShem willing, we arrive safely...")
  • Ha-Motzi

    Hebrew for "brings forth" or "expels," the first unique or identifying word of the blessing over bread ("...brings forth bread from the earth"). Some say this blessing over bread, others recite it as a catch-all before a meal.
  • Ha-shem

    Hebrew for "The Name." Used as a substitute for the Hebrew name for God, which religious Jews are forbidden from uttering outside of prayer. ("This lovely dinner was provided by HaShem - and the Goldsteins!" or "If, HaShem willing, we arrive safely...")
  • haftara

    A selection from the books of Prophets that is read following the weekly Torah portion. There is a Haftorah for each Torah portion.
  • haftarah

    A selection from the books of Prophets that is read following the weekly Torah portion. There is a Haftorah for each Torah portion.
  • Haftora

    A selection from the books of Prophets that is read following the weekly Torah portion. There is a Haftorah for each Torah portion.
  • Haftorah

    A selection from the books of Prophets that is read following the weekly Torah portion. There is a Haftorah for each Torah portion.
  • Hag Sameach

    Happy holiday--also chag sameach.
  • Hagaddah

    Hebrew for "telling," the text that outlines the order of the Passover seder. There are many, many versions of this book, which dates back almost 2,000 years. Because we are commanded to expand upon the story, the Haggadah contains ancient interpretations, as well as stage directions and explanations, for the Passover meal.
  • Hagaddahs

    Plural form of the Hebrew for "telling," it's the text that outlines the order of the Passover seder. There are many, many versions of this book, which dates back almost 2,000 years. Because we are commanded to expand upon the story, the Haggadah contains ancient interpretations, as well as stage directions and explanations, for the Passover meal.
  • Hagaddot

    Plural form of the Hebrew for "telling," it's the text that outlines the order of the Passover seder. There are many, many versions of this book, which dates back almost 2,000 years. Because we are commanded to expand upon the story, the Haggadah contains ancient interpretations, as well as stage directions and explanations, for the Passover meal.
  • Haggadah

    Hebrew for "telling," the text that outlines the order of the Passover seder. There are many, many versions of this book, which dates back almost 2,000 years. Because we are commanded to expand upon the story, the Haggadah contains ancient interpretations, as well as stage directions and explanations, for the Passover meal.
  • Haggadahs

    Plural form of the Hebrew for "telling," it's the text that outlines the order of the Passover seder. There are many, many versions of this book, which dates back almost 2,000 years. Because we are commanded to expand upon the story, the Haggadah contains ancient interpretations, as well as stage directions and explanations, for the Passover meal.
  • Haggadot

    Plural form of the Hebrew for "telling," it's the text that outlines the order of the Passover seder. There are many, many versions of this book, which dates back almost 2,000 years. Because we are commanded to expand upon the story, the Haggadah contains ancient interpretations, as well as stage directions and explanations, for the Passover meal.
  • halacha

    Hebrew for "Jewish law," it's the body of Jewish religious law including biblical law (those commandments found in the Torah), later Talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions.
  • halachic

    Derived from the Hebrew for "Jewish law," it's pertaining or according to the body of Jewish religious law including biblical law (those commandments found in the Torah), later Talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions.
  • Halachically

    Hebrew for "Jewish law," halacha is the body of Jewish religious law including biblical law (those commandments found in the Torah), later Talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions.
  • Halakha

    Hebrew for "Jewish law," it's the body of Jewish religious law including biblical law (those commandments found in the Torah), later Talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions.
  • halakhic

    Derived from the Hebrew for "Jewish law," it's pertaining or according to the body of Jewish religious law including biblical law (those commandments found in the Torah), later Talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions.
  • Halakhically

    Hebrew for "Jewish law," halakha is the body of Jewish religious law including biblical law (those commandments found in the Torah), later Talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions.
  • Hallah

    A bread that comes in a few different varieties; its most common variation is a braided egg bread, though there are water challahs that don't have eggs, and there are whole-wheat challahs which sometimes also don't have eggs. It is customary to being Sabbath and holiday meals by saying blessings and eating challah.
  • Hamantasch

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), this is a triangular cookie with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hamantaschen

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), these are triangular cookies with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hamantash

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), this is a triangular cookie with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hamantashen

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), these are triangular cookies with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hamentasch

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), this is a triangular cookie with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hamentaschen

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), these are triangular cookies with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hamentash

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), this is a triangular cookie with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • hamentashen

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman, the villain of the Purim story, these are triangular cookies with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • Hametz

    Hebrew for "leavened," foods that are not kosher for Passover, such as bread and wheat-based products. It refers to products that are both made from one of five types of grain and have been combined with water and left to stand raw (rise) for longer than eighteen minutes.
  • HaMotzi

    Hebrew for "brings forth" or "expels," the first unique or identifying word of the blessing over bread ("...brings forth bread from the earth"). Some say this blessing over bread, others recite it as a catch-all before a meal.
  • Hannukah

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Hanuka

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Hanukah

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Hanukka

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Hanukkah

    Hanukkah (known by many spellings) is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd Century BCE. It is marked by the lighting of a menorah and the eating of fried foods.
  • Haroses

    Derived from the Hebrew word "cheres," which means clay, it's a mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine eaten as part of the Passover seder. Symbolizing the mortar that the Hebrew slaves used to build the cities for Pharaoh in Egypt, it's one of the symbolic food items on the seder plate.
  • haroset

    Derived from the Hebrew word "cheres," which means clay, it's a mixture of fruit, nuts, and wine eaten as part of the Passover seder. Symbolizing the mortar that the Hebrew slaves used to build the cities for Pharaoh in Egypt, it's one of the symbolic food items on the seder plate.
  • HaShem

    The Name in Hebrew. Used as a substitute for the Hebrew name for God, which religious Jews are forbidden from uttering outside of prayer.
  • HaShem

    Hebrew for "The Name." Used as a substitute for the Hebrew name for God, which religious Jews are forbidden from uttering outside of prayer. ("This lovely dinner was provided by HaShem - and the Goldsteins!" or "If, HaShem willing, we arrive safely...")
  • hasid

    Hebrew for "pious," commonly refers to a member of an Orthodox Jewish mystic movement founded in the 18th century in Eastern Europe by Baal Shem Tov that reacted against Talmudic learning and maintained that God's presence was in all of one's surroundings and that one should serve God in one's every deed and word.
  • hasidic

    Hebrew for "pious," commonly refers to a member of an Orthodox Jewish mystic movement founded in the 18th century in Eastern Europe by Baal Shem Tov that reacted against Talmudic learning and maintained that God's presence was in all of one's surroundings and that one should serve God in one's every deed and word.
  • Hatafas dam bris

    Hebrew for "drop of blood covenant," it is a ritual circumcision for those already circumcised. (Usually men who are converting to Judaism.)
  • Hatafat dam brit

    Hebrew for "drop of blood covenant," it is a ritual circumcision for those already circumcised. (Usually men who are converting to Judaism.)
  • Havdala

    Hebrew for "separation" or "distinction," the ceremony marking the end of the Sabbath on Saturday evenings.
  • Havdalah

    Hebrew for "separation" or "distinction," the ceremony marking the end of the Sabbath on Saturday evenings.
  • Havdalah

    Ceremony marking the end of Shabbat.
  • Havdalla

    Hebrew for "separation" or "distinction," the ceremony marking the end of the Sabbath on Saturday evenings.
  • Havdallah

    Hebrew for "separation" or "distinction," the ceremony marking the end of the Sabbath on Saturday evenings.
  • havura

    Hebrew for "fellowship," a lay-led group that meets for Shabbat or holiday prayer services, life cycle events, and/or Jewish learning or discussion.
  • havurah

    Hebrew for "fellowship," a lay-led group that meets for Shabbat or holiday prayer services, life cycle events, and/or Jewish learning or discussion.
  • hazan

    Hebrew for "cantor," a member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer.
  • hazzan

    Hebrew for "cantor," a member of the Jewish clergy who leads a congregation in songful prayer.
  • Hebrew

    A language of West Semitic origins, culturally considered to be the language of the Jewish people. Ancient or Classical Hebrew is the language of Jewish prayer or study. Modern Hebrew was developed in the late-19th and early 20th centuries as a revival language; today it is spoken by most Israelis.
  • hechscher

    Hebrew for "kosher approval," marking found on food and some kitchen products (like tin foil or dish soap) that shows the item has been certified kosher.
  • hechsher

    Hebrew for "kosher approval," marking found on food and some kitchen products (like tin foil or dish soap) that shows the item has been certified kosher.
  • hekhal

    The Sephardi term for the ark, a cabinet- or cupboard-like structure that houses the Torah(s) in a synagogue.
  • Heksher

    Hebrew for "kosher approval," marking found on food and some kitchen products (like tin foil or dish soap) that shows the item has been certified kosher.
  • hesed shel emes

    Hebrew for "true kindness," refers to burial of the dead.
  • Hesed shel emet

    Hebrew for "true kindness," refers to burial of the dead.
  • Hesped

    Hebrew for "eulogy."
  • Hol Ha’Moed

    Hebrew for "weekdays of the festival," refers to the intermediate days of Passover and Sukkot. For example, the first two days of Passover are a holiday, but the next days are not; on the first days, work is not permitted according to traditional Jewish law, but on the intermediate days work is permitted.
  • Hol HaMoed

    Hebrew for "weekdays of the festival," refers to the intermediate days of Passover and Sukkot. For example, the first two days of Passover are a holiday, but the next days are not; on the first days, work is not permitted according to traditional Jewish law, but on the intermediate days work is permitted.
  • holent

    Stew of beans, grains and meat. Traditional Shabbat dinner.
  • homentasch

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), this is a triangular cookie with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • homentash

    Yiddish for "Haman's pockets," and shaped after the three-corner hat of Haman (the villain of the Purim story), this is a triangular cookie with poppy seed, jam or fruit filling in the middle.
  • hometz

    Hebrew for "leavened," foods that are not kosher for Passover, such as bread and wheat-based products. It refers to products that are both made from one of five types of grain and have been combined with water and left to stand raw (rise) for longer than eighteen minutes.
  • Hora

    Hebrew, derived from the Greek word for "dance," a variety of dances done in a circle, popular in Israel (and the Balkans).
  • horah

    Hebrew, derived from the Greek word for "dance," a variety of dances done in a circle, popular in Israel (and the Balkans).
  • humetz

    Hebrew for "leavened," foods that are not kosher for Passover, such as bread and wheat-based products. It refers to products that are both made from one of five types of grain and have been combined with water and left to stand raw (rise) for longer than eighteen minutes.
  • hupah

    Hebrew for "canopy" or "covering," the structure (open on all four sides) under which a Jewish wedding ceremony takes place. In its simplest for, it consists of a cloth, sheet, or tallit stretched or supported over four poles.
  • huppa

    Hebrew for "canopy" or "covering," the structure (open on all four sides) under which a Jewish wedding ceremony takes place. In its simplest for, it consists of a cloth, sheet, or tallit stretched or supported over four poles.
  • huppah

    Hebrew for "canopy" or "covering," the structure (open on all four sides) under which a Jewish wedding ceremony takes place. In its simplest for, it consists of a cloth, sheet, or tallit stretched or supported over four poles.
  • huppah

    A huppah--often spelled ?chuppah?--is a Jewish wedding canopy with four open sides. A Jewish wedding ceremony typically occurs under a huppah.
  • hutzpah

    A Yiddish word meaning audacity, for good or for bad; commonly used to imply something was gutsy. Derived from the Hebrew word for "insolence."