Glossary

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  • k’lal yisrael

    Hebrew for "All of Israel," a term used to describe and promote a sense of shared community and destiny between Jews around the world.
  • Kaddish

    Hebrew for "holy," a prayer found in Jewish prayer services. There are many versions of the Kaddish, the best known being the Mourner's Kaddish, said by mourners.
  • kasher

    Hebrew for "fit" (as in, "fit for consumption"), the action of making something kosher (like cleaning a kitchen).
  • kashrus

    Hebrew for "fit" (as in, "fit for consumption"), the Jewish dietary laws.
  • kashrut

    Hebrew for "fit" (as in, "fit for consumption"), the Jewish dietary laws.
  • Kavanna

    Hebrew for "intention," referring to having the proper mindset necessary for carrying out rituals or the commandments.
  • Kavannah

    Hebrew for "intention," referring to having the proper mindset necessary for carrying out rituals or the commandments.
  • Kedusha

    Hebrew for "holiness," refers to the prayer of holiness (the third section of the Amidah, or The Standing Prayer).
  • Keriah

    Hebrew for "tearing," refers to the custom of mourners tearing a garment (usually a shirt, jacket or vest) or a ribbon (and affixing it to one's garment) that is worn throughout the shiva period (the first stage of mourning).
  • keriyah

    Hebrew for "tearing," refers to the custom of mourners tearing a garment (usually a shirt, jacket or vest) or a ribbon (and affixing it to one's garment) that is worn throughout the shiva period (the first stage of mourning).
  • Keruv

    Hebrew for "bringing close," a term meaning Jewish outreach.
  • ketuba

    Hebrew for "document," a legal document that is both a prenuptial agreement and a certification that a Jewish marriage has taken place.
  • Ketubah

    Hebrew for "document," a legal document that is both a prenuptial agreement and a certification that a Jewish marriage has taken place.
  • Ketubos

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "ketubah," meaning "document," a legal document that is both a prenuptial agreement and a certification that a Jewish marriage has taken place.
  • Ketubot

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "ketubah," meaning "document," a legal document that is both a prenuptial agreement and a certification that a Jewish marriage has taken place.
  • Kevod hamet

    Hebrew for "respect for the dead," an important concept throughout Jewish bereavement rituals and customs.
  • Kiddush

    Hebrew for "sanctification," a blessing recited over wine or grape juice to sanctify the Sabbath and Jewish holidays.
  • kiddusha

    Hebrew for "holiness," refers to the prayer of holiness (the third section of the Amidah, or The Standing Prayer).
  • Kiddushin

    Hebrew for "sanctification," Jewish marriage is often referred to as Kiddushin, as one partner (traditionally, the bride) becomes "sanctified" (dedicated) to the other partner (traditionally, the groom).
  • kipa

    Hebrew for "skullcap," also known in Yiddish as a "yarmulke," the small, circular headcovering worn by male Jews in most synagogues, and female Jews in more liberal congregations. Traditional Jews were kippot (plural of kippah) all the time.
  • kipot

    Plural of "kippah," Hebrew for "skullcap," also known in Yiddish as a "yarmulke," the small, circular headcovering worn by male Jews in most synagogues, and female Jews in more liberal congregations. Traditional Jews were kippot (plural of kippah) all the time.
  • Kippah

    Hebrew for "skullcap," also known in Yiddish as a "yarmulke," the small, circular headcovering worn by male Jews in most synagogues, and female Jews in more liberal congregations. Traditional Jews were kippot (plural of kippah) all the time.
  • kippot

    Plural of "kippah," Hebrew for "skullcap," also known in Yiddish as a "yarmulke," the small, circular headcovering worn by male Jews in most synagogues, and female Jews in more liberal congregations. Traditional Jews were kippot (plural of kippah) all the time.
  • kiruv

    Hebrew for "bringing close," a term meaning Jewish outreach.
  • klal Yisrael

    Hebrew for "All of Israel," a term used to describe and promote a sense of shared community and destiny between Jews around the world.
  • knish

    Yiddish word for a stuffed pastry, typically baked and round, filled with potato, meat or kasha.
  • knishe

    Yiddish word for a stuffed pastry, typically baked and round, filled with potato, meat or kasha.
  • Kol Nidre

    Aramaic for "all vows," the opening words and name of the first prayer that begins the evening service on Yom Kippur. Kol Nidre has come to refer to the name of the evening service itself.
  • kollel

    Hebrew for a "gathering," usually refers to a gathering or collection of scholars, or an institute for advanced Talmud study.
  • Kosher

    Hebrew for "fit" (as in, "fit for consumption"), the Jewish dietary laws.
  • Kreplach

    Plural form of the Yiddish word "krepl," dumplings filled with meat and usually cooked in soup.
  • Kreplekh

    Plural form of the Yiddish word "krepl," dumplings filled with meat and usually cooked in soup.
  • kria

    Hebrew for "tearing," refers to the custom of mourners tearing a garment (usually a shirt, jacket or vest) or a ribbon (and affixing it to one's garment) that is worn throughout the shiva period (the first stage of mourning).
  • Kriah

    Hebrew for "tearing," refers to the custom of mourners tearing a garment (usually a shirt, jacket or vest) or a ribbon (and affixing it to one's garment) that is worn throughout the shiva period (the first stage of mourning).
  • kugel

    Yiddish word for a savory or sweet pudding made from either noodles, potatoes or matzah.
  • kuggel

    Yiddish word for a savory or sweet pudding made from either noodles, potatoes or matzah.
  • kvater

    Yiddish for "godfather," often the individual who carries a baby in for his bris (circumcision).
  • kvaterin

    Yiddish for "godmother," often the individual who carries a baby in for his bris (circumcision).
  • Kvatter

    Yiddish for "godfather," often the individual who carries a baby in for his bris (circumcision).
  • Kvatterin

    Yiddish for "godmother," often the individual who carries a baby in for his bris (circumcision).