Glossary

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  • M’ark

    Mark Testing the glo'assary.
    L"ine"2.
  • m’shbeirach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • m’shberach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • ma nishtana

    Hebrew for "what is different," the first words of the Four Questions, traditionally recited by the youngest child at the Passover seder.
  • ma nishtanah

    Hebrew for "what is different," the first words of the Four Questions, traditionally recited by the youngest child at the Passover seder.
  • Ma’ariv

    Also known as Ariv, the evening prayer service.
  • ma’asim tovim

    Hebrew for "good deeds."
  • ma’oz tsur

    Hebrew for "Stronghold of Rock" (more commonly known in English as "Rock of Ages"), a Jewish liturgical poem sung on Hanukkah after lighting the candles.
  • Ma’oz Tzur

    Hebrew for "Stronghold of Rock" (more commonly known in English as "Rock of Ages"), a Jewish liturgical poem sung on Hanukkah after lighting the candles.
  • maariv

    Also known as Ariv, the evening prayer service.
  • Maasim tovim

    Hebrew for "good deeds."
  • magen david

    Hebrew for "shield of David," it is more commonly recognized as the star of David, a six-point star. The symbol has origins in the Torah, and has been used as a symbol of Jewish identity and Judaism in Europe since the Middle Ages.
  • mah nishtana

    Hebrew for "what is different," the first words of the Four Questions, traditionally recited by the youngest child at the Passover seder.
  • mah nishtanah

    Hebrew for "what is different," the first words of the Four Questions, traditionally recited by the youngest child at the Passover seder.
  • Maoz Tsur

    Hebrew for "Stronghold of Rock" (more commonly known in English as "Rock of Ages"), a Jewish liturgical poem sung on Hanukkah after lighting the candles.
  • Maoz Tzur

    Hebrew for "Stronghold of Rock" (more commonly known in English as "Rock of Ages"), a Jewish liturgical poem sung on Hanukkah after lighting the candles.
  • Maror

    Hebrew for "bitter," one of the ritual food items on the Passover seder plate. Commonly represented by horseradish or romaine lettuce.
  • Mass

    In Christianity, the celebration of the Eucharist (the sacrament of Holy Communion).
  • matza

    Hebrew word for an unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during the holiday of Passover.
  • matza brei

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • matza brie

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • Matzah

    Hebrew word for an unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during the holiday of Passover.
  • matzah brei

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • matzah brie

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • matzo

    Hebrew word for an unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during the holiday of Passover.
  • matzo brei

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • matzoh

    Hebrew word for an unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during the holiday of Passover.
  • matzoh brei

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • matzoh brie

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • matzos

    Hebrew word for an unleavened bread, traditionally eaten during the holiday of Passover.
  • matzos brei

    Yiddish for "fried matzah," a common Passover breakfast dish that can be savory or sweet, ranging in style from closer to an omelette to closer to French toast, made of matzah and egg.
  • mazal tov

    Hebrew and Yiddish for "good luck," a phrase used to express congratulations for happy and significant occasions.
  • mazel tov

    Hebrew and Yiddish for "good luck," a phrase used to express congratulations for happy and significant occasions.
  • mechitza

    A divider (such as a curtain or barrier) that separates men and women at prayer.
  • mechitzah

    A divider (such as a curtain or barrier) that separates men and women at prayer.
  • Megillah

    Hebrew for "scroll," usually refers to the Scroll of Esther ("Megillat Esther"), the biblical book read on the holiday of Purim.
  • Megillas Esther

    Hebrew for "Scroll of Esther" (or, Book of Esther), the biblical book read on the holiday of Purim.
  • megillat Esther

    Hebrew for "Scroll of Esther" (or, Book of Esther), the biblical book read on the holiday of Purim.
  • mehitza

    A divider (such as a curtain or barrier) that separates men and women at prayer.
  • mehitzah

    A divider (such as a curtain or barrier) that separates men and women at prayer.
  • mench

    Yiddish term for an honorable, decent person, usually means "a person of integrity and honor," someone of good character and a deep sense of what is right.
  • menora

    Hebrew for "candelabrum" or "lamp," it usually refers to the nine-branched candelabrum that is lit for the holiday of Hanukkah. (A seven-branched candelabrum, a symbol of the ancient Temple in Jerusalem, is a symbol of Judaism and is included in Israel's coat of arms.)
  • Menorah

    Hebrew for "candelabrum" or "lamp," it usually refers to the nine-branched candelabrum that is lit for the holiday of Hanukkah. (A seven-branched candelabrum, a symbol of the ancient Temple in Jerusalem, is a symbol of Judaism and is included in Israel's coat of arms.)
  • mensch

    Yiddish term for an honorable, decent person, usually means "a person of integrity and honor," someone of good character and a deep sense of what is right.
  • mentsh

    Yiddish term for an honorable, decent person, usually means "a person of integrity and honor," someone of good character and a deep sense of what is right.
  • meshugah

    Yiddish for "crazy."
  • meshugas

    Yiddish for "craziness."
  • meshuge

    Yiddish for "crazy."
  • meshugeneh

    Yiddish for "crazy."
  • meshugener

    Yiddish for "crazy person."
  • meshuggeneh

    Yiddish for "crazy."
  • mezuza

    Hebrew for "doorpost," it now refers to a small box containing a scroll (of the Hebrew text of the Shema prayer) which is affixed to the doorposts of Jewish homes. Strictly speaking, mezuzah only refers to the scroll itself, not the case in which it's housed.
  • Mezuzah

    Hebrew for "doorpost," it now refers to a small box containing a scroll (of the Hebrew text of the Shema prayer) which is affixed to the doorposts of Jewish homes. Strictly speaking, mezuzah only refers to the scroll itself, not the case in which it's housed.
  • mezuzot

    Plural form of "mezuzah" (Hebrew for "doorpost"), it now refers to a small box containing a scroll (of the Hebrew text of the Shema prayer) which is affixed to the doorposts of Jewish homes. Strictly speaking, mezuzah only refers to the scroll itself, not the case in which it's housed.
  • Mi Shabeirach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • Mi Shebeirach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • mi sheberach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • mi-shebeirach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • mi-sheberach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • Midrash

    Hebrew for "story," a way of interpreting biblical stories that often fills in the gaps left in the biblical narrative and expands on events of characters that are only hinted at.
  • Mikvah

    Hebrew for "collection," referring to the "collection of water," is a bath used for the purpose of ritual immersion in Judaism. Today it is used as part of the traditional procedure for converting to Judaism, by Jews who follow the laws of ritual (body) purity, and sometimes for making kitchen utensils kosher.
  • mikveh

    Hebrew for "collection," referring to the "collection of water," is a bath used for the purpose of ritual immersion in Judaism. Today it is used as part of the traditional procedure for converting to Judaism, by Jews who follow the laws of ritual (body) purity, and sometimes for making kitchen utensils kosher.
  • mincha

    The afternoon prayer service.
  • minchah

    The afternoon prayer service.
  • minhag

    A custom or accepted tradition or group of traditions in Judaism. Plural is "minhagim."
  • minhagim

    A custom or accepted tradition or group of traditions in Judaism. Singular is "minhag."
  • Minyan

    Hebrew for "count," it refers to the quorum of ten Jewish adults (in some communities only men are counted; in others both men and women) required to hold a Torah service, recite some communal prayers, and the home-based recitation of the Kaddish. Minyan may also now refer to group that meets for prayer service, similar to a synagogue's congregation or a havurah.
  • mishabeirach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • mishebeirach

    Hebrew for "May He Who blessed," the first words of the prayer of the same name. Traditionally said in synagogue during the Torah service, a holistic prayer for physical and spiritual healing, asking for blessing, compassion, restoration and strength.
  • mishna

    Hebrew for "repetition" (from the verb meaning "to study and review"), it refers to the first major written redaction of the Jewish oral traditions ("Oral Torah"). Mishnah is the first post-biblical collection of Jewish legal materials, and the primary building block of the Talmud (the major collection of Jewish law), as interpreted by the rabbis.
  • Mishnah

    Hebrew for "repetition" (from the verb meaning "to study and review"), it refers to the first major written redaction of the Jewish oral traditions ("Oral Torah"). Mishnah is the first post-biblical collection of Jewish legal materials, and the primary building block of the Talmud (the major collection of Jewish law), as interpreted by the rabbis.
  • mitzva

    Hebrew for "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • Mitzvah

    Hebrew for "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • mitzvahs

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "mitzvah" which means "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • mitzvas

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "mitzvah" which means "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • mitzvos

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "mitzvah" which means "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • mitzvot

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "mitzvah" which means "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • mitzvoth

    Plural form of the Hebrew word "mitzvah" which means "commandment," it has two meanings. The first are the commandments given in the Torah. ("You should obey the mitzvah of honoring your parents!") The second is a good deed. ("Helping her carry her groceries home was such a mitzvah!")
  • Mizrachi

    Hebrew for "eastern," the term refers to Jews descended from the Jewish communities of the Middle East, North Africa and the Caucasus. The term Mizrahi is used in Israel in the language of politics, media and some social scientists for Jews from the Arab world and adjacent, primarily Muslim-majority countries.
  • Mizrahi

    Hebrew for "eastern," the term refers to Jews descended from the Jewish communities of the Middle East, North Africa and the Caucasus. The term Mizrahi is used in Israel in the language of politics, media and some social scientists for Jews from the Arab world and adjacent, primarily Muslim-majority countries.
  • Mogein Dovid

    Hebrew for "shield of David," it is more commonly recognized as the star of David, a six-point star. The symbol has origins in the Torah, and has been used as a symbol of Jewish identity and Judaism in Europe since the Middle Ages.
  • Mohel

    Hebrew for "circumciser" (Yiddish term is "moyel"), the person who performs a ritual circumcision. The feminine form is "mohelet."
  • mohelet

    Hebrew for "circumciser," the person who performs a ritual circumcision. The masculine form is "mohel." (Yiddish term is "moyel.")
  • motzi

    Hebrew for "brings forth" or "expels," the first unique or identifying word of the blessing over bread ("...brings forth bread from the earth"). Some say this blessing over bread, others recite it as a catch-all before a meal.
  • Moyel

    Yiddish for "circumciser," the person who performs a ritual circumcision. The Hebrew masculine form is "mohel," the Hebrew feminine is "mohelet."