Glossary

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  • parasha

    Hebrew for "portion," one of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parashas

    Plural form of "parashah," Hebrew for "portion." One of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parashot

    Plural form of "parashah," Hebrew for "portion." One of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parsha

    Hebrew for "portion," one of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parshah

    Hebrew for "portion," one of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parshahs

    Plural form of "parashah," Hebrew for "portion." One of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parshas

    Plural form of "parashah," Hebrew for "portion." One of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • parshot

    Plural form of "parashah," Hebrew for "portion." One of 54 sections of the Torah read, during Shabbat services, in order on a weekly basis throughout the year.
  • Passover

    The spring holiday commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from slavery in Egypt. The Hebrew name is "Pesach."
  • payos

    Hebrew for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • payot

    Hebrew for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • Pesach

    Hebrew for "Passover," the spring holiday commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from slavery in Egypt.
  • peye

    Yiddish for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • peyeh

    Yiddish for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • peyes

    Hebrew for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • peyos

    Hebrew for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • peyot

    Hebrew for "sidelock" or "sidecurls," derived from the Hebrew word "pe'eh," meaning "corner" or "side," these are locks of hair that some Orthodox boys and men refrain from cutting or shaving.
  • Peysakh

    Yiddish for "Passover," the spring holiday commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from slavery in Egypt.
  • Peysekh

    Yiddish for "Passover," the spring holiday commemorating the Exodus of the Jews from slavery in Egypt.
  • pikua ha nefesh

    Saving a soul or life. In Jewish tradition, this consideration overrides all others.
  • pikua hanefesh

    Hebrew for "saving a life," a principle in Jewish law that the preservation of human life overrides virtually any other religious consideration.
  • pikuach ha’nefesh

    Hebrew for "saving a life," a principle in Jewish law that the preservation of human life overrides virtually any other religious consideration.
  • Pikuach Nefesh

    Hebrew for "saving a life," a principle in Jewish law that the preservation of human life overrides virtually any other religious consideration.
  • Pikuah ha nefesh

    Hebrew for "saving a life," a principle in Jewish law that the preservation of human life overrides virtually any other religious consideration.
  • Pikuah hanefesh

    Hebrew for "saving a life," a principle in Jewish law that the preservation of human life overrides virtually any other religious consideration.
  • Pikuah nefesh

    Hebrew for "saving a life," a principle in Jewish law that the preservation of human life overrides virtually any other religious consideration.
  • Pirkei Avos

    Hebrew for "Chapters of the Fathers," and commonly known as "Ethics of the Fathers," a compilation of ethical teachings of the rabbis of the Mishnaic period. Included in the Mishnah, it's the only tractate dealing exclusively with ethical and moral principles; there is little or no Jewish law included in these teachings.
  • Pirkei Avot

    Hebrew for "Chapters of the Fathers," and commonly known as "Ethics of the Fathers," a compilation of ethical teachings of the rabbis of the Mishnaic period. Included in the Mishnah, it's the only tractate dealing exclusively with ethical and moral principles; there is little or no Jewish law included in these teachings.
  • Pirkei Avoth

    Hebrew for "Chapters of the Fathers," and commonly known as "Ethics of the Fathers," a compilation of ethical teachings of the rabbis of the Mishnaic period. Included in the Mishnah, it's the only tractate dealing exclusively with ethical and moral principles; there is little or no Jewish law included in these teachings.
  • posek

    Someone who makes Jewish legal decisions, interprets Jewish law ("halakha"). Plural is "poskim."
  • poskim

    Someone who makes Jewish legal decisions, interprets Jewish law ("halakha"). Singular is "posek."
  • Purim

    Hebrew for "lots," referring to the lots cast by Haman, the story's antagonist, to determine the date on which to kill the Jewish people. It's a spring holiday commemorating the Jewish people's triumph. The story is told through the biblical Book of Esther; the namesake heroine, a Jewish woman, marries the Persian king. Their interfaith relationship is central to the story.