Glossary

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  • Sandek

    Hebrew for ?godfather,? the word is specific to the role of holding the baby during a brit milah ceremony.
  • Sandeket

    Female version of the Hebrew word "sandek," which means ?godfather,? the word is specific to the role of holding the baby during a brit milah ceremony.
  • Se’udah

    Hebrew for "meal."
  • Seder

    Hebrew for "order," refers to the traditional course of events, or service, surrounding the Passover and Tu Bishvat meals.
  • Sepharad

    Of the culture of Jews with family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa.
  • sephardi

    Having Jewish family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa. The term literally means "Spanish" in Hebrew.
  • sephardic

    Of the culture of Jews with family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa.
  • sephardim

    Jews with family origins in Spain, Portugal or North Africa.
  • seudah

    Hebrew for "meal."
  • seudat

    Hebrew for "meal."
  • sevivon

    Hebrew for "spinning top," the four-sided toy played with during the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah is more commonly known by its Yiddish name, "dreidel."
  • Sh’hekhiyanu

    Hebrew for "Who has given us life," part of a blessing thanking God for bringing us to a special or new moment.
  • sh’ma

    Hebrew for "hear," the first word and name of the central Jewish prayer and statement of faith.
  • Shabbat

    The Jewish Sabbath, from sunset on Friday to nightfall on Saturday.
  • Shabbat shalom

    Hebrew for "Sabbath [of] peace," a greeting on the Jewish Sabbath.
  • shabbes

    The Jewish Sabbath, from sunset on Friday to nightfall on Saturday.
  • shabbos

    The Jewish Sabbath, from sunset on Friday to nightfall on Saturday.
  • shadchan

    Hebrew for "matchmaker," someone who carries out a "shiddukh" (match).
  • shadkhan

    Hebrew for "matchmaker," someone who carries out a "shiddukh" (match).
  • shadkhn

    Hebrew for "matchmaker," someone who carries out a "shiddukh" (match).
  • Shalom Rav

    Hebrew for "great peace," the prayer for peace at the end of the traditional evening liturgy.
  • Shamash

    Hebrew for "helper," a candle used to light all the other candles in the Hanukkah menorah.
  • shana tova

    Hebrew for "a good year," a typical greeting on Rosh Hashanah.
  • shana tovah

    Hebrew for "a good year," a typical greeting on Rosh Hashanah.
  • shanah tova

    Hebrew for "a good year," a typical greeting on Rosh Hashanah.
  • Shanah tovah

    Hebrew for "a good year," a typical greeting on Rosh Hashanah.
  • Shavuah Tov

    Hebrew for "a good week," a typical greeting on Saturday night, after Havdalah, as the new week starts.
  • Shavuot

    A Summer holiday commemorating the receiving of the Torah on Mount Sinai, it is also known as the Feast of Weeks, as it comes seven weeks after Passover begins.
  • Shehecheyanu

    Hebrew for "Who has given us life," part of a blessing thanking God for bringing us to a special or new moment.
  • shema

    Hebrew for "hear," the first word and name of the central Jewish prayer and statement of faith.
  • Sheva berachot

    Hebrew for "the seven blessings," also known as birkot nissuin ("the wedding blessings"), blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • sheva brachos

    Hebrew for "the seven blessings," also known as birkot nissuin ("the wedding blessings"), blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • Sheva brachot

    Hebrew for "the seven blessings," also known as birkot nissuin ("the wedding blessings"), blessings that are recited for a couple as part of their marriage ceremony.
  • shidduch

    Hebrew for "match," as in a couple that has been set up.
  • shidduchim

    Hebrew for "matches," as in couples that have been set up.
  • shiddukh

    Hebrew for "match," as in a couple that has been set up.
  • shiddukhim

    Hebrew for "matches," as in couples that have been set up.
  • shiva

    Hebrew for "seven," refers to the seven days of mourning following the funeral of a family member.
  • Shloshim

    Hebrew for "thirty," refers to the thirty days of mourning following the funeral of a family member.
  • Shmoneh Esreh

    Hebrew for "The Eighteen," it's an alternate name for Tefilat Amidah, Hebrew for "The Standing Prayer," which is the central prayer of Jewish liturgy. It is recited during every prayer service. Traditionally it's recited individually in silence, then repeated aloud as a congregation; some congregations omit the silent recitation and/or abbreviate the repetition.
  • Shofar

    Simple musical instrument made from a ram's horn that is blown in synagogue on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, as well as each morning after daily services during the Hebrew month of Elul (the month leading up to Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur).
  • Shul

    Yiddish for "synagogue."
  • Shulchan Aruch

    Hebrew for "Set Table," also known as the Code of Jewish Law, it is the most authoritative legal code of Judaism, authored by Rabbi Yosef Karo in 1563.
  • Shulkhan Arukh

    Hebrew for "Set Table," also known as the Code of Jewish Law, it is the most authoritative legal code of Judaism, authored by Rabbi Yosef Karo in 1563.
  • shvitz

    Yiddish for "sweat."
  • siddur

    Hebrew for "prayer book," the plural is "siddurim."
  • siddurim

    Plural form of "siddur," Hebrew for "prayer book."
  • siddurs

    Plural form of "siddur," Hebrew for "prayer book."
  • simcha

    Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • simchah

    Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • simchahs

    Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • simchas

    Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • simchas bas

    Hebrew for "daughter's celebration," a modern term for a naming ceremony for baby girls.
  • Simchas Torah

    Hebrew for "Joy of Torah," a fall holiday that celebrates the completion of the yearlong Torah cycle and the commencement of a new one.
  • Simchat

    Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • simchat bat

    Hebrew for "daughter's celebration," a modern term for a naming ceremony for baby girls.
  • Simchat Torah

    Hebrew for "Joy of Torah," a fall holiday that celebrates the completion of the yearlong Torah cycle and the commencement of a new one.
  • simchos

    Plural form of the Hebrew "simchah," Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • simchot

    Plural form of the Hebrew "simchah," Hebrew for "gladness" or "joy," it is often used to refer to a festive occasion or celebration, like a wedding, bat mitzvah, or bris.
  • sisith

    Hebrew for "tassel" or "fringe," the name for specially knotted ritual fringes (strings). They appear on the four corners of a tallit (prayer shawl worn during prayer services) and tallit katan (small shawl, worn by observant Jews every day under their shirts).
  • sivivon

    Hebrew for "spinning top," the four-sided toy played with during the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah is more commonly known by its Yiddish name, "dreidel."
  • Smachos bas

    Plural form of "simchas bas," Hebrew for "daughter's celebration," a modern term for a naming ceremony for baby girls.
  • Smachot bat

    Plural form of "simchat bat," Hebrew for "daughter's celebration," a modern term for a naming ceremony for baby girls.
  • sofer

    Hebrew for "scribe," someone who is trained in writing Torahs and other Jewish religious scrolls and texts.
  • Soofganiyot

    A Hebrew term for a doughnut, often eaten in Israel during Hanukkah. They are usually filled with jelly and covered in sugar.
  • Star of David

    Known in Hebrew as "magen David" (literally," shield of David"), it is more commonly recognized as the star of David, a six-point star. The symbol has origins in the Torah, and has been used as a symbol of Jewish identity and Judaism in Europe since the Middle Ages.
  • succah

    Hebrew for "booth," a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot ("booths").
  • Succot

    Hebrew for "Booths," it's a fall holiday marking the harvest, like a Jewish Thanksgiving, complete with opportunities for dining and sleeping under the stars.
  • sufganiyot

    A Hebrew term for a doughnut, often eaten in Israel during Hanukkah. They are usually filled with jelly and covered in sugar.
  • Sufganyot

    A Hebrew term for a doughnut, often eaten in Israel during Hanukkah. They are usually filled with jelly and covered in sugar.
  • sukka

    Hebrew for "booth," a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot ("booths").
  • Sukkah

    Hebrew for "booth," a temporary hut constructed for use during the week-long Jewish holiday of Sukkot ("booths").
  • Sukkos

    Hebrew for "Booths," it's a fall holiday marking the harvest, like a Jewish Thanksgiving, complete with opportunities for dining and sleeping under the stars.
  • Sukkot

    Hebrew for "Booths," it's a fall holiday marking the harvest, like a Jewish Thanksgiving, complete with opportunities for dining and sleeping under the stars.
  • synagogue

    Derived from the Greek word for "assembly," a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogue refers to both the room where prayer services are held and the building where it occurs. In Yiddish, "shul." Reform synagogues are often called "temple."